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Portsmouth, Virginia Historical Markers

 
A closeup of A Living Memorial. image, Touch for more information
By Cynthia L. Clark, February 22, 2017
A closeup of A Living Memorial.
Virginia, Portsmouth — A Living Memorial — 1941–1945
In honor of those from West Haven, who served in defense of their country and humanity and in cherished memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice during the Second World War. — Map (db m104375) WM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Captain Ted Conaway Memorial Naval Cemetery 1838-1986
This cemetery was developed on its present site. Several gravestones were moved from an earlier location outside the hospital reservation. It was named after Captain Conaway who served 40 years in the Navy, holding every rate and rank from seaman to . . . — Map (db m37127) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — K-266 — Craney Island
Seven miles northeast in the Elizabeth River is Craney Island, a landmark of two wars. During the War of 1812, the British attacked its fortifications on 22 June 1813, but were repulsed by its defenders including the Portsmouth artillery. During the . . . — Map (db m38265) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — General Lafayette Memorial
To the memory of General Lafayette in grateful recognition of his valiant services and in commemoration of the hundredth anniversary of his visit to our city. — Map (db m104376) WM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Gosport Shipyard
Gosport Shipyard, which later became a United States Naval Shipyard, was established in 1787 by Andrew Sprowle. In 1833 the first drydock in the United States was opened in this yard. — Map (db m71720) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Q-81 — Israel Charles Norcom High School
I.C. Norcom (1856-1916) was an African American educator and administrator who served Portsmouth schools for more than 30 years. The first school to bear his name opened in 1920 three quarters of a mile southeast of here. Principal William E. . . . — Map (db m113668) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Lest We Forget
Dedicated to the honor and glory of all veterans of all wars who have nobly served their country and who by offering their last full measure of devotion, have purchased freedom for our beloved nation. — Map (db m107238) WM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Q 8-z — Mount Calvary Cemetery Complex
African Americans purchased land about a quarter mile southwest of here in 1879 to establish Mt. Olive Cemetery. The property adjoins a potter’s field thought to be a burial place for victims of the yellow fever epidemic of 1855. Later, Mt. Calvary . . . — Map (db m118352) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Q 8-r — Norfolk Naval Shipyard
Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the nation's first government-owned yard, was privately founded here as Gosport Shipyard on 1 Nov. 1767. Virginia seized it in 1776, and it served the state navy during the American Revolution. The U.S. Navy leased it in 1794 . . . — Map (db m76787) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “The Beginning” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Founded November 1767 under the British flag by Andrew Sprowle, a Scottish-born merchant, the Norfolk Naval Shipyard is the U.S. Navy's oldest, continuously operating shipyard and actually predates the United States Navy Department by nearly 30 . . . — Map (db m76823) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “1774-1800” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Leased in 1794 by the federal government, as part of its response to acts of piracy by the Barbary States, the shipyard produced in 1798-99 the 36-gun frigate Chesapeake, a sister ship of the USS Constitution known as "Old Ironsides." . . . — Map (db m76825) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “Hammerhead Crane” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Built between December 1939 and June 1940, this 20-story crane can lift 350 tons. The Hammerhead is the largest crane of its type in the world. Its uses have included lifting a tugboat from the water, hoisting 16-inch gun turrets onto battleships . . . — Map (db m76826) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “Dry Docks Construction” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Dry Dock 2, first built of wood, was completed in November 1887, but rebuilt with concrete in 1933. Dry Dock 3 was completed in November 1903. Dry Dock 4 was opened on April 1, 1919, with the King and Queen of Belgium in attendance. Dry Dock 5 . . . — Map (db m76827) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “1889-1904” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
With the advent of the Spanish-American War, an era of wood and canvas gave way to steel and steam in naval shipbuilding. The first U.S. Navy battleship to be commissioned, the USS Texas, and the first modern cruiser, the USS . . . — Map (db m76828) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “World War I” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
World War I ushered in a new period of growth for the shipyard. Three new dry docks and a major ship building way were added, in addition to new shop facilities. With the focus on ship repairs, along with construction of destroyers and 110-foot . . . — Map (db m76829) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “World War II” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
The yard’s employment peak of 43,000 workers was reached during World War II when the yard bustled with activity, building nearly 30 major vessels and repairing 6,850 U.S. and Allied ships. The shipyard also built 20 tank-landing ships and 50 . . . — Map (db m76830) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “Korea - 1965” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
The outbreak of hostilities in Korea in 1950 increased the workload once again. The shipyard completed work on more than 1,250 naval vessels and also built its last two warships, the wooden-hulled minesweepers Bold and Bulwark. . . . — Map (db m76835) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “1907-1922” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
In 1907 President Theodore Roosevelt launched the "Great White Fleet" from the shipyard as it began its journey around the world. Norfolk Naval Shipyard built the first flight deck on a ship, the USS Birmingham (CS-2). When . . . — Map (db m76836) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “Dry Dock 1” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Convinced of the need to more quickly and efficiently repair the nation's Navy ships, President John Quincy Adams and Congress agreed in 1827 to follow engineers' recommendations to build two dry docks, one here and one in Boston. The . . . — Map (db m76838) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “1833-1862” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Following the evacuation and burning of the yard by Federal forces, Dry Dock 1 was used by the Confederate States Navy to convert the partly burned steam frigate Merrimack into an ironclad, renamed CSS Virginia. In March 1862, the . . . — Map (db m76839) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “1812-1833” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
After the War of 1812, the shipyard helped repel an invasion of Craney Island and the USS Chesapeake was captured off Nova Scotia. Gosport continued to expand and improve. The keel of the USS Delaware was laid in the summer of 1817. . . . — Map (db m76840) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard — “Quarters A” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Three prominent structures stand out along a one-block stretch of Portsmouth's Lincoln Street – Quarters A, B and C. On an 1827 map of the shipyard they are designated as the “Proposed Commandant's House,” the “Proposed . . . — Map (db m76841) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Q 8h — Portsmouth Naval Hospital
This was begun in 1827 and opened in 1830. The hospital was taxed to its capacity in the Great Yellow Fever Epidemic in 1855 which decimated Portsmouth and Norfolk. This hospital has cared for the sick and wounded of the Navy in all wars of the . . . — Map (db m37107) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital — “World War II and Korea 1937-1953” — Fort Nelson Park —
World War II created the need to rapidly expand the hospital in 1941. The $1.5 million program increased the number of hospital beds to 3,441. A dental clinic, ships service, library and a bank were added. The staff -- medical officers, nurses, . . . — Map (db m83925) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital — “Hospital Renovation 1907-1910” — Fort Nelson Park —
By 1900, time and use had taken its toll on the hospital building. In October 1907, the Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery ordered hospital personnel to remove patients to tent-covered wooden platforms constructed several hundred yards away from . . . — Map (db m83926) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Sail portion of the USS Thomas Jefferson — (SSBN 618) later SSN 618 — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
During USS Thomas Jefferson's 22 years of service, it was both a ballistic missile submarine and an attack vessel. Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company built USS Thomas Jefferson, which was commissioned on January 4th, 1963. The . . . — Map (db m76837) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — K-268 — The Battle of Craney Island
On the morning of June 22, 1813, during the War of 1812, British naval and marine forces under the command of Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren landed here at Hoffler Creek. American armed militia under the command of Gen. Robert B. Taylor blocked the . . . — Map (db m22154) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — V. C. Andrews Monument
(front) Best Selling Novels: Flowers in the Attic; Petals on the Wind; If There be Thorns; My Sweet Audrina; Seeds of Yesterday; Heaven; Dark Angels. (rear) Books opened doors I hadn’t even realized were there. They took me up and . . . — Map (db m112481) HM

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