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Prestonsburg, Kentucky Historical Markers

 
A Desperate Fight, but Few Casualties Marker on the Union Trail image, Touch for more information
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2016
A Desperate Fight, but Few Casualties Marker on the Union Trail
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — A Desperate Fight, but Few Casualties
Compared to battles fought later in the war, Middle Creek produced very light casualties. Though more than 3,000 participated in the fight, only fifteen men were killed. Union losses at Middle Creek were three killed and eighteen wounded. . . . — Map (db m97547) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — 817 — County Named, 1799
For Col. John Floyd. Born Amherst County, Va., 1750. Led party to survey land now Kentucky, 1774. With George Rogers Clark’s Indian expeditions. Back in Va., joined Colonial navy. Captured, taken to England. Escaped. Built Floyd’s Station, 1779 or . . . — Map (db m97255) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Eastern Kentucky's Civil War Battles and Skirmishes, 1861-1862
Skirmish at West Liberty, October 23 1861 - Col. L.A. Harris' 2nd Ohio Infantry regiment and a company of Union cavalry, part of Gen. William "Bull" Nelson's command, skirmish with Capt. Jack May's much smaller Morgan Guards, driving them . . . — Map (db m69143) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Eastern Kentucky's Civil War Battles and Skirmishes, 1863-1864
Marshall's Raid Through Eastern Kentucky, March-April 1863 - On March 15, 1863, Marshall comes through Pound Gap with 1,800 mounted men, including Col. Henry Giltner's 4th Kentucky, Col. Thomas Johnson's 2nd Kentucky, Col. Ezekiel F. . . . — Map (db m69145) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Floyd County Veterans Memorial
All Veterans Gave Some These Veterans Gave All World War I Harris Arnett • Grade Burchett • Reuben Calvin Clark • James H. Collins • William M. Cox • Jesse Coyer • Sam Dillon • Bud Endicott • Josh Fife • Tip Gayheart • Edward D. Hall . . . — Map (db m97261) WM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Greenville R. Davidson
In Memory of Greenville R. Davidson and Confederate Veterans of Floyd County Who Fought for Our Confederacy — Map (db m97254) WM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — John Graham
In Memory Of John Graham Revolutionary Soldier Who Rests in Floyd County This Tablet Marks the Site of the First Floyd County Court House Given By Him — Map (db m97202) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Kentuckian versus Kentuckian (I)
Born in Bourbon County, Clay was the son of Congressman Brutus J. Clay and the nephew of Cassius M. Clay, Lincoln's Minister to Russia. He saw action at Middle Creek and later served with Wheeler's Cavalry in Tennessee. Wounded and captured during . . . — Map (db m69140) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Kentuckian versus Kentuckian (II)
Son of a Frankfort lawyer, Monroe led the charge which decided the battle's outcome. He and his regiment later saw action at Chickasaw Bluffs, Arkansas Post, Champion Hill, Thompson's Hill, and other important battles. In 1864 Monroe assumed command . . . — Map (db m69141) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Kentucky Blue Blood versus Ohio Self-Made Man
The Union and Confederate forces were led by two very different men. Humphrey Marshall was a Kentucky blue blood and a representative of one of the state's leading families. James A. Garfield was a self-made man born in a log cabin on his father's . . . — Map (db m69138) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Monroe's Bayonet Charge Wins the Battle
The battle’s turning point came when Garfield ordered Lt. Col. George W. Monroe and a detachment of the 22nd Kentucky to charge up the steep ridge opposite Graveyard Point and drive the Confederate sharpshooters back to their main line. Monroe was a . . . — Map (db m97546) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — 623 — Morgan's Last Raid
(Side One) Morgan’s Last Raid On tragic last Kentucky raid, Gen. John H. Morgan and Raiders entered state June 1, 1864, took Mt. Sterling June 8, lost it on June 9th, took Lexington on 10th, and Cynthiana on 11th. USA under Gen. . . . — Map (db m97225) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — 2117 — Prestonsburg Toll Bridge / Chesapeake & Ohio Railway System
(Side One) Prestonsburg Toll Bridge This bridge, known as “Old Red” Bridge,” crossed the Levisa Fork of Big Sandy River. Opened for foot passengers and vehicles on January 6, 1908, it had a span of 430 feet was . . . — Map (db m97203) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — 2018 — Samuel May / Samuel May House
(Side One) Samuel May (1783 - 1851) Son of Revolutionary War veteran John May and Sarah Phillips May, Samuel settled in Prestonsburg around 1807. Commissioned to build county’s first brick courthouse in 1818. Elected state . . . — Map (db m97260) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Battle of Middle CreekJanuary 10, 1862
Middle Creek was Eastern Kentucky's largest and most significant Civil War battle. It was fought during the first phase of the war, when it was still doubtful which government would control the region. The Confederates never regained the strategic . . . — Map (db m69136) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — 2093 — The Battle of Middle Creek / The Fitzpatrick Farm
(Obverse Side) The Battle of Middle Creek At this site, on Jan. 10, 1862, Union troops under Col. James A. Garfield defeated Confederates led by Gen. Humphrey Marshall. Garfield's 1,100 Ohioians and Kentuckians advanced up Middle . . . — Map (db m66935) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Burns House / A Brief History of the Garfield Place
(Side One) The Burns House: Garfield’s Headquarters Following the Battle of Middle Creek Built in 1857 by Prestonsburg attorney John M. Burns, the house later known as “The Garfield Place” stood near this spot. . . . — Map (db m97224) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Confederate Command Post
Marshall’s command post at the Forks of Middle Creek provided him with an excellent vantage point from which to view the valley and deal with unforeseen contingencies. The lower valley, extending northeast, was his route of approach. The left fork . . . — Map (db m97393) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Confederate Waiting Game
Pursued by Garfield after his strong defensive position on Hager’s Hill was outflanked, Marshall decided to fall back to Prestonsburg, move up Middle Creek, and lure his adversary into an ambush. After abandoning his fortified position on Hager . . . — Map (db m97392) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The May FarmStaging Area for Humphrey Marshall's Confederates
The 400-acre May Farm, with its steam-powered grist mill, was used as a recruiting post and staging area by the region’s leading secessionists. In September 1861, Jack May, Hiram Hawkins, Ezekial Clay, James M. Thomas, Benjamin Desha, and other . . . — Map (db m97381) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Middle Creek National Battlefield Foundation
The Middle Creek National Battlefield Foundation, Inc., a non-profit corporation, is an organization of community leaders and historians who have joined together to preserve this nationally significant Civil War battlefield. The foundation's purpose . . . — Map (db m69139) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Union Assault
The Confederate position along the heavily wooded ridge overlooking Middle Creek was a strong one. To avoid exposing his troops to the combined fire of all the Confederate regiments, Garfield chose to assault the south end of their line rather than . . . — Map (db m97540) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — The Union Command Post
During the reconnaissance which preceded the battle, Garfield chose Graveyard Point, the high ridge opposite Spurlock Creek, as his command post. In a letter to his wife, Lucretia, written several days after the battle, Garfield says: . . . — Map (db m97539) HM
Kentucky (Floyd County), Prestonsburg — Why They Fought Here
During the first few months of the war, Kentucky remained neutral. The August 1861 election, however, sent a Unionist majority to Frankfort. The new legislature voted to suppress the rebellion, and Federal marshals began arresting men suspected of . . . — Map (db m69137) HM

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