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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Tinbridge Hill

 
Agnes and Lizzie Langley Marker image, Touch for more information
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
Agnes and Lizzie Langley Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Agnes and Lizzie Langley
According to Court and City Directory records, mother and daughter, Agnes (1789-1874) and Lizzie (1833-1891) Langley ran a "Sporting House" on Commerce Street during the 19th century. Later, Lynchburg's "Red Light District" of World War II fame was . . . — Map (db m156588) HM
2Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Bransford VawterLynchburg's First Poet — 1815-1838 —
. . . — Map (db m156589) HM
3Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Cemetery Caretakers
The first official caretaker of the cemetery was hired by the City of Lynchburg in 1866. He was paid $100 a year, and was only responsible for the care of the Confederate section. Over the years the role of the caretaker expanded to include . . . — Map (db m74093) HM
4Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Chapel and Columbarium
This chapel was modeled after the 1880 Ivy Chapel Union Church in Bedford County. Most of the construction materials and furnishings were salvaged from the demolition of the c. 1870 Hermon Methodist Church at Oakville in Appomattox County. The bell . . . — Map (db m74040) HM
5Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — College Hill Reservoir Water Pitcher
The cast-iron pitcher was made by Glamorgan foundry of Lynchburg and given to the city in October 1890 for use at the College Hill Reservoir. Shortly after installation, the local newspaper praised the pitcher as “a handsome and striking . . . — Map (db m74068) HM
6Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Confederate Smallpox Memorial
In memory of the Confederate Soldiers who died of smallpox in the hospitals of Lynchburg during the War between the States. C. S. A. — Map (db m156559) HM WM
7Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Court Street Baptist Church Tragedy
On October 16, 1876, a tragic “false alarm” panic at the old Court Street Baptist Church resulted in the deaths of eight people attending a wedding reception there. One of these young women, Maria Wilson, age 17, is buried nearby. . . . — Map (db m74055) HM
8Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Crippled Corps and V.M.I. Cadets Form Inner Defenses in Old City CemeteryBattle of Lynchburg, June 18, 1864
A week before the city of Lynchburg was to be invaded by 18,000 Union troops, the city lay vulnerable, unprotected by Confederate forces. Brigadier General Francis T. Nicholls, a double amputee, who had recovered in a Lynchburg hospital, . . . — Map (db m74052) HM
9Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Eleanor Custis Lewis Carter
In memory of Eleanor Custis Lewis Carter 1800-1845 wife of Henry Brown Jr. and wife of John H. Patteson M.D. great-niece of George Washington — Map (db m156590) HM
10Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Gravemarkers in the Old City CemeteryLynchburg, Virginia
A Project Sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy and the Southern Memorial Association Special thanks to the following people, who contributed to the research and design of this exhibit: James Deetz • . . . — Map (db m74094) HM
11Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Gravestone Carvers in the Old City Cemetery
The dates beneath each carver’s name represent the span of his gravestones in the cemetery. The Fieldstone Carver First Gravestone Carver in Lynchburg 1811-1849 The fieldstone carver is the oldest professional carver of . . . — Map (db m74095) HM
12Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Hearse House & Caretakers' Museum
This museum tells the story of the care of the cemetery's grounds and gravemarkers over the past 200 years. On display is an elegant horse-drawn hearse used by Lynchburg's W.D. Diuguid Funeral Directors in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. A simple . . . — Map (db m74037) HM
13Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Hermon Methodist ChurchAppomattox County, Virginia — c.1870-1969 —
Hermon Methodist Church was established in c.1870 in Appomattox County, Virginia. The church was named for the biblical Mount Hermon. It was located east of Route 24 on what is now property of the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. A . . . — Map (db m74064) HM
14Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — History of the Stapleton Station
1898 Station built by Chesapeake & Ohio Railway for $366.59, based on C&O “Standard Station No. 2” design. 1929 C&O Railway made the Station a non-agency station (without an agent) and discontinued its telegraph office. . . . — Map (db m74076) HM
15Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Q-6-9 — Inner Defences
Near here ran the line of inner defences located by Gen. D. H. Hill, June, 1864. He had been sent from Petersburg by Gen. Beauregard to assist Gen. Breckinridge then in command. On Gen. Early’s arrival, troops were moved to the outer work. — Map (db m15539) HM
16Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Iron Fencing
This cast-iron fence, now surrounding the Earley Memorial Shrub Garden, originally enclosed College Hill Reservoir, located only a few blocks away on Park Ave. It was installed there in 1878 when the city had outgrown the old Clay Street Reservoir. . . . — Map (db m74066) HM
17Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Ivy Chapel Union ChurchBedford County, Virginia — 1880-c.1950 —
Ivy Chapel Union Church was built in I880 on Coffee Road in Bedford County, Virginia. The chapel was named for nearby Ivy Creek. It was known as a “union church” because it served as a house of worship for Baptist, Methodist, and . . . — Map (db m74065) HM
18Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Q-13 — Jacob E. Yoder
Jacob Eschbach Yoder (22 Feb. 1838-15 Apr. 1905), reared a Mennonite in Pennsylvania, came to Lynchburg after the Civil War to teach former slaves in the Freedmen's Bureau's Camp Davis School. Following Reconstruction, Yoder served as supervising . . . — Map (db m74007) HM
19Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Life and Death
Life… Hundreds of people buried in this cemetery were employed by the railroad industry. The railroad’s contributions to Lynchburg’s economy were extraordinary, and it was a major employer in the city between 1850 and 1920. Railroads . . . — Map (db m74082) HM
20Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Lucy Mina Otey and the Ladie’s Relief Hospital
The unsung and frequently unappreciated heroes of the Confederacy were the Southern women who worked in hospitals. Mrs. Lucy Mina Otey, age 60 and a recent widow who eventually lost three sons in the Civil War, formed a corps of 500 Lynchburg women, . . . — Map (db m74050) HM
21Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Lynchburg, VirginiaA Civil War Hospital Center
Lynchburg was known as “Tobacco Town” before the Civil War, with its 70 thriving tobacco businesses and numerous warehouses. It was also a railroad hub, the terminus of three railroads. Early in the Civil War, many of the warehouses were . . . — Map (db m74049) HM
22Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Lynchburg, Virginia, 1864Terminus of Three Major Railroads
This map shows Lynchburg during the Civil War Battle of Lynchburg, June 1864. The “Public Burying Ground,” also known as the Old Methodist Cemetery or Old City Cemetery, was located at the edge of town. By 1860 three major . . . — Map (db m74077) HM
23Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Lynchburg’s Confederate Surgeons
Lynchburg’s hospital center was staffed with over 50 military surgeons reporting for duty from all parts of the Confederacy. The War Department appointed Lynchburg physician, William Otway Owen, as Surgeon-in-Charge of Lynchburg’s large medical . . . — Map (db m74051) HM
24Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Lynchburg’s First Public Hanging, 1830
Near this spot on the afternoon of August 16, 1830, John M. Jones was hanged in Lynchburg’s first public execution. In May of 1829, Jones, a Lynchburg slaveowner, had killed George Hamilton on the James River waterfront in a dispute over Jones’s . . . — Map (db m155539) HM
25Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Marble Column
This three piece marble column adorned the front of the First National Bank building, Tenth and Main Streets. It was built 1908-09, P. Thornton Marye, architect. When the building was completely remodeled in 1976-77 all marble was replaced by a . . . — Map (db m156584) HM
26Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Q-6-25 — Old City Cemetery
Old City Cemetery, also known as the Methodist Cemetery, was established as a public burial ground in 1806 on land donated by John Lynch, founder of Lynchburg. Mayors and other prominent civic leaders, along with the city's indigent and . . . — Map (db m74011) HM
27Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Old City Cemetery(Old Methodist Cemetery) — Lynchburg’s Oldest African-American Burial Ground —
This old burying ground, established in 1806, is where most of Lynchburg's African Americans were laid to rest in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As many as 75% of the estimated 20,000 people buried here are African-American. This . . . — Map (db m74025) HM
28Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Old City CemeteryAlso known as the Old Methodist Cemetery — The City of Lynchburg, Virginia —
This 1929 map of the boundaries of the Old City Cemetery is the only known record available to locate graves “within the walls” in the older section of the cemetery. Even today no records exist for grave locations throughout the cemetery . . . — Map (db m74027) HM
29Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Old City CemeteryLynchburg, Virginia — Civil War Sites —
“With a graveyard on one side, quartermaster’s glanders stable on the other, and smallpox hospital in the middle, one (is) reminded of the mortality of man.” “A Confederate Surgeon’s Story,” Confederate Veteran, 1931, John . . . — Map (db m155505) HM
30Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Pest House Medical Museum
This 1840’s white frame building was the medical office of Dr. John Jay Terrell. It was moved here in 1987 from Rock Castle Farm in Campbell County and has been restored to recreate medical science in the era of 1860 to 1900. These exhibits . . . — Map (db m74038) HM
31Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Professor Frank Trigg(1850-1933)
“Frank Trigg came into this world a slave and was buried a retired college president.” He was born in 1850 at the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, as his parents, Sarah and Frank Sr., served Governor John B. Floyd. At age 13 he lost an . . . — Map (db m74060) HM
32Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Removal of Federal Dead
(panel 1) "The work of removing the bodies of Federal soldiers, who died here during the war, was commenced on yesterday. Their remains will be taken from this place to City Point for re-interment." Lynchburg Daily Virginian Saturday, . . . — Map (db m156593) HM
33Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Silas Green
Silas Green was born into slavery around the year 1845 on a plantation in Franklin County, Virginia. According to local legend, soon after the beginning of the Civil War, Green voluntarily enrolled in the Confederate army. His owner considered him . . . — Map (db m74059) HM
34Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Sinister Activities
Sinister Activities had been rumored in 1897, but great alarm spread among both Negro and White citizens when it was discovered that the body of a young woman, Ella Jamieson, supposed to be buried in Potter's Field, was instead being shipped to . . . — Map (db m74061) HM
35Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Site of Glanders Stable
. . . — Map (db m74041) HM
36Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Site of Lynchburg's Pest House
Site of Lynchburg’s Pest House Constructed circa 1840 Served as Confederate Quarantine Hospital 1861 - 1865 Demolished 1880 — Map (db m74042) HM
37Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Station House Museum
This Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Station was in use at Stapleton in Amherst County, Virginia, from 1898 until 1937. It is the only remaining C&O “Standard Station” of its size and style. In 1999-2001 the badly-deteriorated Station was . . . — Map (db m74036) HM
38Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Stone Well Cap
These two large hand carved stones fit together to form a well cap which was the traditional well cover in use in the 1800s in Lynchburg. This one was brought here from the site of a house (now demolished) at 1714 Elm Street, high on a bluff . . . — Map (db m156594) HM
39Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Carl Porter Cato Rose Collection
These roses have reached their final resting place! Originally, they were in the rose collection of nationally recognized rosarian Carl Porter Cato (1913-1996) of Lynchburg. Through many years, he had salvaged cuttings or entire plants from . . . — Map (db m74092) HM
40Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Confederate Memorial Arch
This memorial arch marking the entrance to the Confederate Section was built in 1925 by the Southern Memorial Association. Lynchburg architect S. Preston Craighill designed the arch and specified "...good, clean rubble stone, with concrete center . . . — Map (db m156586) HM WM
41Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Confederate SectionOld City Cemetery
In this area are buried over 2200 Confederate soldiers from fourteen states, most of whom died in Lynchburg’s numerous military hospitals during the Civil War. From the first burial on May 19, 1861, until the last on September 19, 1868, undertaker . . . — Map (db m155506) HM
42Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Gatehouse Story
In October, 1995, Hillside Garden Club won the prestigious Common Wealth Award from the Garden Club of Virginia for a proposed Information Gatehouse and expanded entry for the Old City Cemetery. The old brick gates, which had been designed by J. . . . — Map (db m156587) HM
43Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Old Brick Wall
This historic brick wall is all that remains of the Cemetery's original enclosure, which was built in sections beginning in 1827, and extended almost one mile in length. Most of the wall was demolished by the City of Lynchburg as it . . . — Map (db m74058) HM
44Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — The Quartermaster’s Glanders Stable
Horses and mules were essential to the operation of the Civil War, and bass numbers of animals were needed. Lynchburg, one of the four quartermaster depots for the Confederacy, was supplying General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. In . . . — Map (db m74062) HM
45Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — To the Grave of the Nieces of George Washington
← To the grave of the nieces of George Washington — Map (db m156592) HM
46Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Virginia Theological Seminary and College
Among the many prominent early graduates of this institution are three ministers, all from classes circa 1904, who are buried nearby within a few hundred feet of each other. Their pastorates, however, were in Baptist churches across the United . . . — Map (db m156591) HM
47Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg”
During the First World War, many people across the country knew Lynchhurg as “Lunchburg.” The City earned this nickname because of its famous Red Cross Canteen Service to soldiers traveling by train through Lynchburg. From 1917 to I919, . . . — Map (db m74069) HM
48Virginia (Lynchburg), Tinbridge Hill — Women of Lynchburg's Confederate Hospitals
”The whole course of our ordinary life was changed. All our usual avocations were at an end, and a new life began for women.” —Susan Leigh Blackford (1835-1916) Lynchburg nurse during Civil War The Civil War, . . . — Map (db m156600) HM
 
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