“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Dallas County Alabama Historical Markers

Cahawba Marker image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, July 30, 2014
Cahawba Marker
Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — Cahawba
Site of Alabama's first permanent capital 1820-26. County seat Dallas County, 1820-66. Prison for Union soldiers during the War Between the States 1863-65. Indians were the first inhabitants over 4000 years ago. Their large fortified village could . . . — Map (db m75779) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — The Beloit Industrial Institute
Marker Front: The Beloit Industrial Institute was founded in 1888 by Industrial Missionary Association, an area subdivision of the American Missionary Associations. The President of the Association, Dr. Charles B. Curtis, was a Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m83504) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — A Courthouse Reduced to Rubble
Prior to 1905, workmen in search of salvageable bricks dismantled the old Dallas County Courthouse (pictured here). The grassy mound before you contains the damaged bricks the workmen left behind. Cahawba was the county seat from . . . — Map (db m112559) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — A Prison Chimney?
This engraving of the Union Prison at Cahaba was published in 1877 by Benson J. Lossing. The stockade had already been removed, so the details of the brick structure are visible. The artist apparently was in a boat in the Alabama River, behind you . . . — Map (db m83506) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Alabama's First Statehouse
Alabama's first statehouse stood on this lot, but no drawing by a person who actually saw it has been found. It was built in 1819 and destroyed in 1833, before the invention of photography. There are many drawings of the statehouse, but all are pure . . . — Map (db m75908) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Alabama's Native Prairie
Waist-high grasses billowing in the wind. Rolling prairie expanses. Most people connect these images with the Midwest's Great Plains. But for thousands of years, tallgrass soils of Alabama's Black Belt. Along prairie—25 miles across . . . — Map (db m112692) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Anna Gayle Fry House
Home site of the author of "Memories of Old Cahaba," whose family lived here from the Capital's earliest days as landowners and lawyers, giving her a rich legacy of town history. Married to a doctor, she moved to Galveston, Texas, and returned here . . . — Map (db m112360) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Behind the Big House
Two story brick slave quarters like the one before you were not typical, but they could be found in wealthy towns like Cahawba. Stephen Barker built these quarters in 1860 on the northern edge of town. As you can see in the . . . — Map (db m112472) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Black Belt Transformations
Alabama's Black Belt region derives its name from a narrow sash of dark, fertile soil across the state's midsection. Covering 1000 square miles, the Black Belt occupies just 2% of the state's landmass, but its history and transformations . . . — Map (db m112800) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba Drug Store
The Cahaba Drug Store once covered this cellar hole. It was operated by Herbert Hudson and J. D. Craig. On the same lot were T. L. Craig's large family grocery, Coleman's dry goods store, and Fellows' Jewelry. All these men were related . . . — Map (db m23008) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba First State Capital — 1818-1826
This stone marks the site of Cahaba, selected November 21, 1818 as the first permanent capital of Alabama. The seat of goverment remaining here until removed to Tuscaloosa by the Legislature, January 1825. On December 13, 1819, it was fixed as . . . — Map (db m22609) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba's Changing Landscape
In 1818, Alabama's first governor carved the capital city of Cahawba out of the wilderness. In less than 50 years, Cahawba grew from a frontier capital full of log cabins to one of America's wealthiest communities, with some of the . . . — Map (db m112690) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahawba - circa 1500
Two Ghost Towns? Long before Cahawba was built as Alabama's first state capital, there was another village at this location. Just like Cahawba, it thrived for about 50 years, then disappeared. About the year 1500 a group of . . . — Map (db m112450) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Captive Boys in Blue
In 1862 the Confederacy used one of Cahawba's brick cotton warehouses to temporarily house men captured at the Battle of Shiloh. In 1863, they officially converted the warehouse into a military prison. The inmates called it "Castle . . . — Map (db m112528) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Castle Morgan & Jesse Hawes
The Union soldiers held captive in Cahaba's Civil War Prison, called the place Castle Morgan in honor of a daring Confederate raider. In 1888 Jesse Hawes published a book about his imprisonment in Castle Morgan. He drew this diagram from memory. . . . — Map (db m22668) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Civil War Prison
In 1858, the railroad company graded away an Indian mound that stood here. A brick warehouse was built in its place. From 1863 - 1865 the Confederate government used this warehouse to hold captured Federal Soldiers. You are standing on a pile of . . . — Map (db m22666) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Commissary - R.R. Depot
This cellar was under Joseph Babcock's brick store. During the Civil War the building was used as a commissary. Babcock's warehouse and cotton shed were located to your right on the bluff overlooking the river. The family home, kitchen, and . . . — Map (db m23287) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Crocheron's Row
A "row" was a 19th century shopping mall. The word was used when a building or block had several similar storefronts arranged in a straight line or row. This cellar marks the spot where David and Nicholas Crocheron built a large 2 story brick . . . — Map (db m83509) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Dallas County Courthouse
The grassed over mound of brick before you was once Dallas County's courthouse. This courthouse was built in 1834. It was dismantled prior to 1905 by brick salvagers. Cahawba was the county seat from 1818 to 1866. This brought a lot of people, . . . — Map (db m23010) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Death in the Street
On a May afternoon in 1856, an angry John A. Bell rounded this corner carrying a large hickory stick. He passed by Edward Perine's fine brick store, and continued south down the sidewalk. Under his coat, he carried two pistols and a . . . — Map (db m112527) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Footprint of a Church
St. Luke's Episcopal Church was built at Cahawba in 1854 but was dismantled and moved sometime after 1884 but before 1888. It was reassembled fifteen miles away in a rural community called Martin's Station. The raised outline before you indicates . . . — Map (db m83510) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Kirk-View Farm
In 1866, shortly after the Civil War and a severe flood, the county seat was moved from Cahaba to Selma. Residents rapidly abandoned the town. Many homes were dismantled and reassembled elsewhere. Despite this trend, returning Confederate . . . — Map (db m83516) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Major Hiram Solon Hanchett — 16th Illinois Cavalry - U.S. Volunteers
On January 20th, 1865, Major Hanchett lead a daring, but unsuccessful escape from the military prison that was located on this spot. He was then moved to the dungeon of the county jail, located on First North Street. In March the other Union . . . — Map (db m22669) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Memorials for Prisoners of War
These are not graves. These are markers to memoralize the Federal soldiers who died in the Cahawba Military Prison during the Civil War. The men within the prison called it "Castle Morgan." No one knows where in Cahawba these . . . — Map (db m112409) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Methodist Church
These ruins were once a place of worship for members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Built in 1849, it was the first single denomination church in Cahawba. An earlier church for the common use of all denominations was erected about 1840. . . . — Map (db m112410) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Missing Pieces
"We by-and-by discovered...a pair of those splendid birds, the Ivory-billed Woodpeckers (Picus principalis). They were engaged in rapping some tall dead pines, in a dense part of the forest, which rang with their loud notes." . . . — Map (db m112801) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — New Cemetery
Burials in this cemetery, which served Cahaba from 1848 to 1900, tell a story of the town in which many deaths resulted from diseases of infancy, childhood and early adult life, Yellow Fever being a large factor because of proximity to Gulf of . . . — Map (db m23322) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Old Cemetery
This site was set aside by the 1820 General Assembly, burials here date from 1818 to 1847. Interred are some of the state's earliest figures. There is no record of names, many handsome tombs have been destroyed, seven marked ones remaining, six are . . . — Map (db m23355) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Perine Well
This artesian well was drilled to serve a factory which did not materialize. It was then used to water the grounds, a garden and pastures. In addition, by forcing water through pipes into his $50,000 home, E. M. Perine, a merchant prince, had the . . . — Map (db m83518) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Saltmarsh Hall
In the late 1850s, Cahaba experienced a building boom. Everyone expected the town to prosper because of the new railroad. One of the first large brick structures built in this prosperous period was completed in 1856 by Dr. Saltmarsh. He wanted . . . — Map (db m23009) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Site of Alabama's Statehouse — 1820 - 1825
This structure collapsed in 1833 and its fallen remains were reportedly heaped into a railroad embankment. Consequently, we have no picture of the Statehouse that was drawn by someone who actually saw the building. Any modern picture you see of this . . . — Map (db m75909) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — St. Luke's Episcopal Church
St. Luke's was consecrated in 1854. It was an outstanding example of the Gothic Revival style, popular at the time. The contractor closely followed designs in a widely circulated book, Rural Architecture, published in 1852 by the celebrated . . . — Map (db m75922) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Crocheron Columns
The Crocherons were from Staten Island, New York. Richard Conner Crocheron arrived in town about 1837 to help run the family store. He traveled north for his bride in 1843 after building her this brick home. The back wall adjoined the brick store . . . — Map (db m22870) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Duke of Cahaba
In 1889, Samuel and Sarah Kirkpatrick moved to Selma, leaving their farm and house in the capable hands of their son Clifton (1863-1930). He turned the abandoned remains of Alabama's first capital into a showcase farm of diversified, scientific . . . — Map (db m23005) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Duke of Cahaba
Look around you. There are hundreds of pecan trees growing nearby. All were planted by Clifton Kirkpatrick, a.k.a. The Duke of Cahaba." (Note: Cahawba lost its "w" by the late 19th century.) In 1889 Samuel and Sarah Kirkpatrick . . . — Map (db m112473) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Hole That Was Once a Row
1822 - Crocheron's Row Cahawba's First Shopping Center This large hole was dug in 1822 to be the basement beneath Cahawba's first brick store. In the 19th century the word "row" described a building that consisted of . . . — Map (db m112577) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Old Brick Store
By 1858 many brick stores had been built in Cahaba, so everyone called this the "old brick store." Merchant Sam M. Hill turned the building into one huge dry goods store where shoppers could buy just about anything! Col. Hill, like most of the . . . — Map (db m23242) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Vine Street
Vine Street was Cahawba's business district. Stores, offices and hotels were tightly packed together along these three blocks. Homes were scattered over an entire square mile. Nearly every house had a yard of one or two acres. — Map (db m83520) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Welcome to Downtown Cahawba
Cahawba's homes were spread over an entire square mile, many with yards of one or two acres. That was not the case here on Vine Street. Offices, stores and hotels were tightly packed along this main street. The steamboat landings on the . . . — Map (db m112560) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Who Lived Here?
This house, the Fambro / Arthur home, takes its name from two of its owners. One was a judge, the other was a former slave. The Fambro Family A. Judge W. W. Fambro built this house in the early 1840s. He may have created . . . — Map (db m112451) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Yankees in Cahawba
A New York merchant, Richard Conner Crocheron, built a magnificant mansion on this spot. The adjacent photograph captured the decayed splendor of this home before it burned. Look closely at the photograph. Try to identify the columns . . . — Map (db m112582) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Marion Junction — Prosperity Cemetery
Prosperity Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church Cemetery is the resting place of many members of the church from 1846 until 1961. The Church was organized in 1822 by Isaac Grier. A church building stood on this site from 1844 until 1891, . . . — Map (db m112357) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Orrville — Orrville United Methodist Church
Frank Orr and his brother, William, settled Orrville in the early 1800's with a very strong religious group of people. A church was soon organized and a place of worship was built on this site in 1846. The church was known as the Methodist Episcopal . . . — Map (db m23003) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Orville — Whitt Cemetery
Whitt Cemetery has been placed on the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register by the Alabama Historical Commission — Map (db m112356) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Pleasant Hill — Mount Carmel Church
A Cumberland Presbyterian church named Mt. Pleasant was organized here about 1821 by Rev. William James Moor, a missionary from the Elk Presbytery of Tennessee. Renamed Mount Carmel in 1827, this church provided early leadership for the Ala. . . . — Map (db m75777) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — “Fairoaks”
This Greek revival mansion was built c. 1853 for William B. King and named “Fairoaks” for the many trees found about the place. King was the nephew of Vice President William Rufus King. Ann B. Wilson, a half-sister of the builder, . . . — Map (db m83521) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — A Grassroots Movement — Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
For centuries, Selma was a city where the rules of race were enforced by humiliation and fear. But Selma gave birth to one of the greatest grassroots campaigns in history—the voting rights movement. The Selma to Montgomery march was . . . — Map (db m112370) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Arsenal Anvil
Anvil used in Selma’s Confederate Arsenal to make armament for Southern forces. Presented to Sturdivant Museum Association April 1, 1961 by the Southern Railway Company which as the Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad Company purchased the anvil . . . — Map (db m37690) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Arsenal Place — 1862 CSA 1865
This memorial marks the site of the Arsenal, a unit of the Great Ordnance Works in Selma destroyed by the Union Army April 6, 1865. These ordnance works stood second only to those of Richmond in the manufacture of war materials for the . . . — Map (db m37661) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge / U.S. Congress Approves Voting Rights Act of 1965
Side 1 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge A voting registration campaign in 1965 turned tragic Feb. 17 when an Alabama state trooper fatally shot Jimmie Lee Jackson in Marion. It prompted a protest march from . . . — Map (db m81944) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — British West Florida, 1764-83
Colony’s north boundary crossed present-day Alabama - Mississippi at this point on 32° 28’ by edict of British king. Colony extended south to Gulf. France had ceded area in 1763. Spain invaded, seized area in 1780. Britain . . . — Map (db m37644) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Burning of Downtown — St. Paul's Episcopal Church — Battle of Selma
"Of all the nights of my experience, this is most like the horrors of war — a captured city burning at night, a victorious army advancing, and a demoralized one retreating. ...this Sunday night nearly gone, will be remembered. If there is a . . . — Map (db m82744) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Campsite 1 — Selma to Montgomery Trail
Hall Farm March 21, 1965 — Map (db m61846) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Craig Air Force Base — Advanced Flying Training School
On May 3. 1941, the largest flying field in the United States, military or civilian, opened its gates as a new unit of the Southeast Air Corps Training Center, where flying cadets received advanced schooling in the handling of multi-mile-a-minute . . . — Map (db m92359) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Dallas County Korean War Memorial
Front KOREA In Honor and Memory of our Veterans who Served in the Korean War 1950 — 1953 ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ Against overwhelming odds our valiant service men and women withstood the . . . — Map (db m82043) WM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Dallas County Vietnam Memorial
Front VIETNAM Honor ✯ Duty ✯ Sacrifice In Grateful Memory and Honor of all Veterans from Dallas County who served in the Vietnam Conflict 1965 — 1973 ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ . . . — Map (db m82039) WM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Dallas County World Wars Memorial — Lest· We· Forget — World War I 1917-1918 — World War II 1941-1945
Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. St. John, 15-13 Erected in grateful humility to the enduring memory of those of Dallas County whose names appear hereon who made the supreme . . . — Map (db m83522) WM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Defense of Selma Memorial
In Memoriam Here fell brave men in defense of their homes April 2, 1865. Col. William T. Minter Rev. Arthur M. Small Robert N. Philpot and other valiant soldiers “They fought and fell they served us well" Lest We . . . — Map (db m83576) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Ecor Bienville — 1702-1743 — The first recorded name of Selma
. . . — Map (db m37658) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Edmund Pettus Bridge — National Historic Landmark
Edmund Pettus Bridge has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance for its association with "Bloody Sunday," a seminal event in the Civil Rights Movement. Here, on March 7, 1965, . . . — Map (db m82037) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Edmund Winston Pettus House Site
Edmund Winston Pettus, lawyer, General C.S.A., U.S. Senator, was born Limestone County, Alabama, 1821. Admitted to bar, 1842. Moved to Cahaba, 1858. Major, C.S.A., 1861. Brigadier General, 1863. U.S. Senator, 1897-1907. Resided here . . . — Map (db m38273) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Fairoaks Square
Once a gracious turn-of-the-century neighborhood, many of the homes here were close to condemnation when purchased by Circle “S” Industries, Inc. in 1980. In all, 12 Victorian cottages were renovated in the area. Built between 1870 . . . — Map (db m37651) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — First Baptist Church — Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
First Baptist was the first church in Selma to open its doors to members of the Dallas County Voters League as well as to young activists from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. From 1963 to 1965, under the leadership of Reverend M.C. . . . — Map (db m112366) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — George Washington Carver Homes Projects — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Street
In 1952, the City of Selma accepted federal funds to build the George Washington Carver Homes Projects. The residences became “The Face of the Civil Rights Movement” to many in the 1960s because Dr. King, the Southern Christian . . . — Map (db m112354) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — George Washington Carver Neighborhood — Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
The George Washington Carver neighborhood served as base camp for the votings rights movement during the tumultuous weeks of March 1965. These blocks of brick two-story homes—the city's first and largest federal housing project for blacks, . . . — Map (db m112365) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Highlights of Selma History / William Rufus DeVane King 1786-1853
[Side A:] Highlights of Selma History Dallas County was created by Territorial Legislature Feb. 9, 1818. Selma Land Company formed Mar. 19, 1819 by George Phillips, William Rufus King, Jesse Beene, Gilbert Shearer and Caleb Tate. . . . — Map (db m37679) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Honoring: Amelia Boynton Robinson - Marie Foster
The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 Mothers of the Civil Rights Movement Before and Beyond the Bridge Didn't Let Nothing Turn Them Around! Presented by The Evelyn Gibson Lowery . . . — Map (db m111691) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — I Had A Dream — Dr. Martin L. King Jr.
The demonstration that led to the most important advance in civil rights for millions of Black Americans began here March 21, 1965. It was the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the State Capital. Defying threats of death, Dr. . . . — Map (db m83578) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — In Honor of James Joseph Reeb — 1927-1965 — “This Good Man”
Rev. James J. Reeb, an Army Veteran and Unitarian minister from Casper, Wyoming, was working in Boston when Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. appealed for clergymen of all faiths to come to Selma to protest the violence that occurred at the Edmund Pettus . . . — Map (db m37683) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — In Memory of Reverend Hosea Williams, Sr.
Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 He Fed the Hungry "Unbossed and Unbought" 1926-2000 Presented by SCLC/W.O.M.E.N. Inc. Women's Organizational Movement for Equality . . . — Map (db m111689) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Interior Redoubt No. III — Wilson's Cavalry Charge — Battle of Selma
By 6pm General James H. Wilson had moved the 4th U.S. Cavalry, down Summerfield Road through the outer works and had ordered Captain Robinson of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery to do the same. After the main assault most of the regiments of . . . — Map (db m81930) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Joe T. Pilcher, Jr. — 1929 - 1987
. . . — Map (db m92372) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — John Tyler Morgan House
This was the residence of John Tyler Morgan (1824-1907), one of Alabama’s most honored political and military leaders. Constructed in 1859 by Thomas R. Wetmore, it was purchased by Morgan in 1865, and served for many years as his principal . . . — Map (db m37676) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Joseph T. Smitherman Historic Building
Central Masonic Institute of Alabama acquired property 1847 and erected building. Confederate Hospital during War Between the States. Dallas County Courthouse (1866-1901) on removal of County Seat from Cahaba. Presbyterian High School for Boys in . . . — Map (db m37656) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Last Stronghold Falls — Alabama & Mississippi Railroad Depot — Battle of Selma
Hardie's Reserve Cavalry Battalion, about 500 strong were ordered to Selma from Talladega. They were placed along the railroad track to the right and Left of the Depot. This makeshift defensive line was made of the railroad bed, the Depot, cotton . . . — Map (db m82756) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lee - Bender - Butler House
This Greek Revival house was built circa 1850 by Thomas Helm Lee, master builder and owner of early Selma lumber yard. Born in Kentucky, he was the son of Miller Lee of Buckingham County, Virginia and married Mary Jane Blanks of Cahaba in 1839. He . . . — Map (db m37674) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lewis Scott — A Quote from Lewis - "I See With Memory"
At the age of 20, Lewis lost his sight in 1957 from Glaucoma. He learned the language of braille, other independent living and vocational skills during his attendance at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind in Talladega, Alabama. . . . — Map (db m112363) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lieutenant John Tillman Melvin — United States Navy R.F.
Erected by the Citizens of Selma to Commemorate the Heroism of Lieutenant John Tillman Melvin United States Navy, R.F. Born Selma, Alabama Oct. 16, 1887 Among the first to volunteer and the first American Naval officer killed in action . . . — Map (db m37660) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Live Oak Cemetery
East portion reserved for graveyard, 1829; west part purchased City of Selma, 1877. Here are buried: William Rufus King, 1786-1853, Vice President of U.S. 1853. John Tyler Morgan, 1824-1907, U.S. Senator, Brig. Gen. C.S.A. Edmund . . . — Map (db m37653) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest Monument
Front Defender of Selma Wizard of the Saddle Untutored Genius The First With the Most This monument stands as testament of our perpetual devotion and respect for Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest CSA, . . . — Map (db m92363) HM WM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Mabry - Jones Home
This Greek Revival dwelling was built c. 1850 by Dr. Albert Gallatin Mabry, a prominent physician and member of the Alabama Legislature. Dr. Mabry was a leader in organizing the Alabama State Medical Association and instrumental in passing . . . — Map (db m83580) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Memorial Stadium — Selma Alabama
Erected and dedicated to the memory of those of Dallas County who fought and died in two world wars that we may retain our great heritage of freedom, justice and democracy World War I April 6, 1917–November 11, 1918 . . . — Map (db m82029) WM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — R.B. Hudson High School — Dallas County
This school was the city of Selma's first public high school for African-Americans. Completed in 1949, the school was named in honor of Richard Byron Hudson, a black educator who had served for 41 years as principal of Clark Elementary School, . . . — Map (db m82741) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Redoubt No. 15 — 1st Mississippi Cavalry — Battle of Selma
Front Redoubt No. 15 located just to the west of Summerfield Road was defended by Colonel Pinson's 1st Mississippi Cavalry Regiment of Anderson's Brigade. Their 400 men held positions on the west side of the road and the rest of . . . — Map (db m81925) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Redoubt No. 24 — Selma Fortifications 1863-1865 — Battle of Selma
Side 1 At prominent positions, earthen forts were built with artillery in position to cover the ground over which an assault would have to be made. Redoubt No. 24 anchored the City's defenses at the junction of Valley Creek & the . . . — Map (db m83581) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sanctuary to Stage — Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
The shooting of Jimmie Lee Jackson in nearby Marion, Alabama, transformed Brown Chapel from a sanctuary into a staging area for the Selma march, In a passionate sermon SCLC worker James Bevel suggested making a pilgrimage to the State Capitol to . . . — Map (db m112364) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Selma Army Arsenal — 1862~1865 — Battle of Selma
Confederate Army Captain James White was ordered to relocate the old Federal Arsenal from Mt. Vernon, Alabama. By 1865 it consisted of 24 buildings and had over 500 workers including men, women, boys, girls, FMofC and slaves. It made or contracted . . . — Map (db m82750) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Selma Navy Yard and Ordnance Works
This boulder marks the site of the Selma Navy Yard and the Ordnance Works destroyed by the Federals 1865This tablet is placed in honor of the memory of hundreds of faithful men who made these great works a base for war material for the entire . . . — Map (db m37688) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sgt Robert Weakley Patton — Born 1844 - Died 1865 — Battle of Selma
Patton, a member of Shockley's Escort Company of the University of Alabama, was killed in a clash with the 4th Iowa Cavalry at the corner of Washington Street and Alabama Avenue. In November 1865 his father, Robert Miller Patton, was elected the . . . — Map (db m83587) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Site of Selma-Dallas County’s 1st Bridge 1884-1940
Toll Fees (Until 1900) 5’ Pedestrians 10’ Peddlers, Horseman 25’ 1 Horse Buggy 50’ 2 Horse Buggy 75’ 4 Horse Buggy Camelback type High Truss Bridge 1- 228’ Swing Span 2- 200’ Fixed Spans 1- 265’ Approach Built by . . . — Map (db m37670) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — St. James Hotel — Headquarters of General James H. Wilson — Battle of Selma
following the Battle of Selma, April 2, 1865. This occupation protected the hotel from the arson and looting in the first 24 hours that destroyed much of downtown. In the next week Wilson methodically burned the huge military/industrial complex that . . . — Map (db m80792) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Est. 1838
Side A The original church, built one block south of the present site, was consecrated in 1843 by Bishop Leonidas Polk. In 1861, the second Bishop of Alabama, the Rt. Rev. Richard H. Wilmer, was elected there. During the Battle of Selma, St. . . . — Map (db m37691) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sturdivant Hall
One of the finest examples of neo-classic architecture in the South; designed by Thomas Helm Lee for Edward T. Watts. Completed in 1853. Sold 1864 to John M. Parkman, 1870 to Emile Gillman. Purchased in 1957 through a bequest from Robert . . . — Map (db m37649) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist Church — Dallas County
Side 1 In January 1885, Dr. Edward M. Brawley, President, Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School (now Selma University) formed Tabernacle Baptist Church to be an integral part of the students' Christian formation and education. . . . — Map (db m82034) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist Church — Dallas County
Side 1 Tabernacle Baptist Church was founded in 1885, and in March of that year, the congregation purchased this site. Built in 1922 under the leadership of Dr. David Vivian Jemison, the current church features bricks from the original . . . — Map (db m83677) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Take Her Down — Gilmore, Howard Walter - Commander, U.S.N. — Born 29 September 1902, Selma, Ala.
Medal of Honor Citation For distinguished gallantry and valor above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of U. S. submarine GROWLER (SS-215) during her fourth war patrol in the Southwest Pacific from 10 January to 7 . . . — Map (db m82036) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Temple Mishkan Israel
Side A The earliest Jewish settlers came to Selma prior to the Civil War, some as early as the 1830’s. A group of Jewish citizens assembled as the Mishkan Israel Congregation and began meeting in private homes in 1867. The congregation was . . . — Map (db m37677) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Honorable John Lewis
Honoring: Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 "Get in the Way" "When We Pray, We Move Our Feet" Presented by: The Evelyn Gibson Lowery . . . — Map (db m111683) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Selma Movement — (The Beginning) / (The Prize)
[Side A:] (The Beginning) The major civil rights protest, which focused national attention on the issue of racial discrimination in voting & led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, was centered in Selma. In January . . . — Map (db m37662) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Sleeping Prophet
Edgar Cayce (1877-1945), was internationally accepted as an extremely gifted psychic. An humble man, he never profited materially from his psychic ability, but used it to help “make manifest the love of God and man.” Operated his . . . — Map (db m83680) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — This Tablet Commemorates the Visit of Lafayette
Soldier of France Volunteer in the cause of American Liberty Guest of the Nation Entertained in Selma On his way to Cahaba 1825 Placed by the Cherokee Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Selma, Alabama June 14, . . . — Map (db m37671) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Turning Point — Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
By early 1964, the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL) and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's (SNCC) efforts to organize for voting rights had reached a turning point. In July 1964 Judge James Hare, pressured by Selma law enforcement to . . . — Map (db m112369) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Union Troops Charge — The Main Assault of the Outer Works — Battle of Selma
The Lightening Brigade of the 2nd Division would spearhead the attack between Redoubts No. 13 - No. 16. Artillery covered all the approaches. At 5 p.m. General Long ordered the Second Division forward. "As Long's Second Division charged . . . — Map (db m83682) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Valley Creek Presbyterian Church — One of state’s first Presbyterian churches
Established in 1816 by eight families from Rocky River Presbyterian Church in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. In 1859 this two-story brick building replaced original wooden structure. Sanctuary and former slave gallery are on second . . . — Map (db m83683) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — VII In. Brooke Rifle — # S-5
Cast Aug 24, 1863 in Selma at the Confederate Naval Gun Foundry under direction of Commander Catesby ap R. Jones. Was the first gun shipped from the Selma Foundry. Served as stern pivot gun on the Selma-built ironclad ram CSS . . . — Map (db m37678) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Ware - Baker - Jones House
Built c. 1859 by Henry H. Ware, this house exemplifies the picturesque eclecticism which dominated Alabama architecture after 1850. It mixes elements of the older neoclassicism with the newer Victorian trends. Prominent owners through the years . . . — Map (db m37675) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Water Avenue
Selma’s Water Avenue is one of the finest surviving examples of a 19th century riverfront street in the south. Located here are structures which reflect the architectural trends in commercial buildings from 1830 to 1900. This was the main . . . — Map (db m37669) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — White - Force Cottage
This Italianate style cottage was built in 1859 by C. B. and Martha Todd White. Mrs. White, half sister of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, was an outspoken Southern patriot, who subjected the Lincolns to severe criticism, when the Northern press accused her . . . — Map (db m38274) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — William Rufus de Vane King — 1786-1853
Native Sampson County, North Carolina. Admitted to bar, 1806. North Carolina House of Commons 1807-1809. U.S. Congressman 1811-16. Secretary U.S. Legation Naples and St. Petersburg 1816-1818. Moved to Dallas County, Alabama, 1818. . . . — Map (db m37654) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Valley Grande — Childers Chapel
Established circa 1819 as Childers Meeting House on land given by George Childers. Patent for the land was issued to George Childers March 16, 1819. This Methodist Church was later known as Childers Chapel. Church burned in 1842. Congregation . . . — Map (db m37646) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Valley Grande — Summerfield Methodist Church
Congregation was organized as early as 1837, first under the charge of Charles McLeod and next, Asbury H. Shanks. Contract for the present building was let October 23, 1844, and the building was dedicated on October 5, 1845. Greenberry Garrett was . . . — Map (db m37647) HM

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