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Mercer County Kentucky Historical Markers

 
John Gordon's Station Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
John Gordon's Station Marker
Kentucky (Mercer County), Burgin — 73 — John Gordon's Station
On Shakertown Road (Kentucky Route 33), on the left when traveling north.
This is the site of John and Elizabeth Grayson Gordon's second station, with the first station becoming the property of Stephen Trigg. John Gordon was killed at the Battle of Blue Licks, and his land was inherited by his son Ambrose Gordon. The site . . . — Map (db m105456) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Burgin — 2431 — Rev. John Rice(1760~1843)
On Shakertown Road (Kentucky Route 33), on the left when traveling north.
Side 1 A Va. native, Rice served in the Illinois regiment under command of Col. George Rogers Clark during the American revolution. After the war, he brought his family to Ky. and settled on Shawnee run in Mercer Co. Ordained soon after he . . . — Map (db m105418) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1295 — An Early Derby Winner / Another Derby Winner
On Linden Avenue north of Fairground Road, on the left when traveling north.
An Early Derby Winner Leonatus, the 1883 Kentucky Derby winner, owned by Col. Jack Chinn and George Morgan, at old Leonatus Farm, 7 mi. east, in Mercer Co. By Longfellow, out of Semper Felix, by *Phaeton, as a three-year-old, within a . . . — Map (db m68288) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1343 — Boone's CaveNot Open To Public
On Lexington Road (U.S. 68) at Handy Pike Road, on the right when traveling west on Lexington Road.
Only cave in Kentucky historically verified as used by Daniel Boone. He spent rest of winter in cave alone after companion, John Stuart, was killed in January, 1770, the first recorded white man killed by Indians in Ky. Boone joined in summer by . . . — Map (db m68252) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1335 — Early Gun Shop Site / Civil War Armorer
On Mooreland Avenue east of Chestnut Street, on the right when traveling east.
Early Gun Shop Site Here Benjamin Mills made some of finest rifles in US, ca. 1830-50. His muzzle loaders famous for dual trigger system. Used by Kit Carson and Dr. Christopher Graham, conceded to be best rifle shot in world at that . . . — Map (db m46252) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 45 — Fort Harrod
On South College Street (U.S. 127) at West Lexington Street, on the right when traveling south on South College Street.
Begun in 1774 by James Harrod and Company, the Fort was crucial to the settlement of Harrodsburg and Kentucky. The present replica was erected in 1927 on Old Fort Hill also known as Seminary Hill. President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited the Fort in . . . — Map (db m46261) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1874 — Gabriel Slaughter1767 - 1830
On Lexington Road (U.S. 68) at Curry Pike (County Route 1343), on the right when traveling west on Lexington Road.
Called "lieutenant governor and acting governor," Gabriel Slaughter directed the Commonwealth, 1816-20, after death of Gov. Madison. In spite of succession controversy, the Mercer Co. farmer-soldier, Ky. congressman, and twice lt. gov. earned . . . — Map (db m68248) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1297 — Graham Springs
On Linden Avenue north of Fairground Road, on the left when traveling north.
As early as 1807, springs in this area were used as a spa. In 1827, Dr. Christopher C. Graham purchased the springs. This "Saratoga of the West" flourished until 1853, when sold to US Gov't. as a military asylum. Fire later destroyed main buildings . . . — Map (db m68313) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 551 — Harrodsburg Springs
On Mooreland Avenue (Kentucky Route 152) at South College Street (U.S. 127), on the right when traveling west on Mooreland Avenue.
An exclusive spa was located here from 1820-1853, then sold to U.S. Government as Western Military Asylum for aged veterans. After main building burned, veterans were moved in 1859 to Washington, D.C. Ballroom and cottages were opened Oct. 8, 1862 . . . — Map (db m46251) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1877 — James Harrod
On West Lexington Street at Fort Street, on the right when traveling west on West Lexington Street.
Born in Pa., this explorer and military leader came here in 1774. Chose Big Spring as site of Ky.'s first settlement. When that area flooded, he and his men built Fort Harrod on higher ground. James Harrod led in protecting area and promoting . . . — Map (db m46254) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 72 — John McMurtry’s Station
On Lexington Road (Kentucky Route 33), on the right when traveling north.
John and Elizabeth McCoun McMurtry established this station around 1780, and the log house presumed to be part of the station still exists within this structure. Captain McMurtry survived the Battle of Blue Licks but was captured, required to . . . — Map (db m105457) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — Lincoln Marriage Temple
Near South College Street (U.S. 127) at West Lexington Street, on the right when traveling south.
The parents of our nation's sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln, were Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks. In this cabin, on June 12, 1806, they were married by Reverend Jesse Head. — Map (db m46322) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1325 — Neighbors-Governors / Mercer Governors
On Lexington Road (U.S. 68) south of Chinn Lane, on the right when traveling west.
Neighbors-Governors? <--- Former home, grave, of Gabriel Slaughter, governor 1816-20. Born in Virginia, 1767. Died here, 1830. While in office, advocated state support for the public schools. ---> Former home of John Adair, governor . . . — Map (db m68245) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1637 — Original Fort Harrod Site
On West Lexington Street at Fort Street, on the right when traveling west on West Lexington Street.
(obverse) A crude fortification was located at "The Big Spring," 1774. Warned of impending Indian war, Harrod and his men were ordered east to participate in Dunmore's War. They returned in 1775 and chose this site on high ground; it was . . . — Map (db m46253) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — Osage Orange Tree
Near South College Street (U.S. 127) south of West Lexington Street, on the right when traveling south.
Circa late 18th century Tree crown is 76’ Tree height is 88’ Circumference of tree standing 12’-4” Diameter at breast height 56” This tree is taller and broader than the National Champion, but remains Unofficial . . . — Map (db m46522) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — Pioneer Graveyard
Near West Lexington Street west of South College Street (U.S. 127), on the left when traveling west.
This graveyard was just South of Fort Harrod. The original fort was located on the hill where our present day parking lot is. Over 480 grave stones still remain in this pioneer graveyard. — Map (db m46523) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — The Baptist Tabernacle of The Wilderness
Near East Lexington Street (U.S. 68) east of Woodland Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
Scene of the first series of religious services conducted in Kentucky by Reverend Thomas Tinsley a Baptist Minister, assisted by William Hickman April - May 1776. The spreading Elm was the pioneers' first sanctuary. — Map (db m68272) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — The Lincoln Marriage Cabin
Near South College Street (U.S. 127) at West Lexington Street, on the right when traveling south.
The marriage of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks took place on the Beechland property of Nancy’s uncle, Richard Berry Sr., in Washington County, about twenty-five miles southwest of here, on June 12, 1806. The ceremony was presided over by the . . . — Map (db m46317) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — The Lincoln Move to the Frontier
Near South College Street (U.S. 127) at West Lexington Street, on the right when traveling south.
The Lincoln family first came to America in the seventeenth century, originally settling in the Massachusetts Bay colony. The Lincolns continued to move throughout the colonies, settling in present-day New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Thomas . . . — Map (db m46319) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Harrodsburg — 1530 — Wilderness Revival
On East Lexington Street (U.S. 68) east of Woodland Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
Scene of the first of a series of religious revivals conducted in Kentucky during April and May of 1776. The Rev. Thomas Tinsley, a Baptist minister, was assisted by William Hickman in meetings held here under a spreading elm tree. The tree was only . . . — Map (db m68254) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Salvisa — 928 — Pioneer Teacher, 1779 / McAfee Station
On Louisville Road (U.S. 127), on the right when traveling north.
Pioneer Teacher, 1779 John May, first teacher in school at McAfee Station, 1779. One of four Ky. Dist. delegates, 1781, to Va. House of Burgesses. First clerk of Supreme Court, Ky. Dist. and one of original trustees of Transylvania Seminary, . . . — Map (db m105460) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Salvisa — 328 — Pioneer Teacher, 1779 / McAfee Station
On Louisville Road (U.S. 127), on the left when traveling north.
Pioneer Teacher, 1779 John May, first teacher in school at McAfee Station, 1779. One of four Ky. Dist. delegates, 1781, to Va. House of Burgesses. First clerk of Supreme Court, Ky. Dist. and one of original trustees of Transylvania Seminary, . . . — Map (db m105541) HM
Kentucky (Mercer County), Salvisa — 1751 — Warwick/Oregon / Warwick
On Louisville Road (U.S. 127) at Oregon Road, on the right when traveling north on Louisville Road.
Warwick/Oregon Warwick flourished for some 50 years and was succeeded by Oregon. Both were early shipping ports. Flatboats, during Warwick era, and later steamboats, at Oregon, ran regularly between here and New Orleans. This point was at head . . . — Map (db m105463) HM

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