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Montgomery County Maryland Historical Markers

515 markers matched your search criteria. Markers 201 through 401 are listed. Previous 200 Next 115
 
Clara Barton House image, Touch for more information
By Allen C. Browne, December 22, 2011
Clara Barton House
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Clara Barton HouseRegistered National Historic Landmark
On Oxford Road.
Clara Barton House has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the history of the United . . . — Map (db m70672) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Civil Rights Protest
Near MacArthur Boulevard 0.2 miles south of Goldsboro Road.
On June 30, 1960 African Americans Gwendolyn Greene (Britt), William Griffin, Michael Proctor, Marvous Saunders and Cecil Washington Jr. were arrested when they attempted to ride Glen Echo Park's Dentzel Carousel and were charged with trespassing on . . . — Map (db m30484) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo From Past to Present
Near MacArthur Boulevard near Oxford Road.
For more than 100 years this land, now Glen Echo Park, has been dedicated to the people: first in 1891 as a National Chautauqua Assembly, a center where people could participate in the sciences, arts, languages, and literature; second in 1899 as a . . . — Map (db m380) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo ParkGeorge Washington Memorial Parkway — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Near Macarthur Boulevard south of Goldsboro Road, on the right when traveling south.
Fun is where you find it... Glen Echo Park, the Washington DC Metro area's premier amusement park from 1898 to 1968, is the only amusement park preserved by the National Park system. In the early 1890's this was a National Chautauqua . . . — Map (db m130060) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo ParkGeorge Washington Parkway
Near Macarthur Boulevard south of Oxford Road, on the right when traveling south.
The Park Carousel A park highlight is the 1921 Dentzel Carousel. In 1960, the park's first Civil Rights protest occurred on the Carousel. After Glen Echo Park became a national park unit, local residents raised $80,000 in one month to keep . . . — Map (db m131203) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park c. 1930
The entrance to Glen Echo Park has undergone many changes. The 1940 art deco design has been restored, but prior entrances included a stone entrance in the 1890's with the early trolley lines in front and the 1911 entrance, which featured numerous . . . — Map (db m5754) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park: Aerial View c. 1954
Among the familiar structures in this aerial photo are old attractions - the Fun House, Coaster Dips, Crystal Pool, and Flying Scooter. Still present in the park today are the Ballroom, the Arcade and the Dentzel Carousel as well as other smaller . . . — Map (db m5752) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park: Chautaugua c. 1891
The Chautaugua Program at Glen Echo opened June 16, 1891 and offered classes and lectures in all areas of the liberal and practical arts. The education program ran for only one year, but the buildings were used by the amusement park for decades. The . . . — Map (db m5753) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park: Protest Years 1960
On June 30, 1960 local university students and citizens began a sit-in confrontation and picket line to challenge the long-standing segregation policies at the Park. Their efforts succeeded in 1961 when the Park's private owner, Rekab, Inc., finally . . . — Map (db m5750) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park: Spanish Ballroom c. 1943
Social dancing has been an important attraction at Glen Echo since the 1890's. The Spanish Garden Ballroom, built in 1933 in the Spanish Mission Revival style of architecture, boasted a 7,000 square-foot maple dance floor, colorful columns and red . . . — Map (db m5751) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo Park’s Crystal Pool
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
For the trolley parks of the 1900’s, pools were important, lucrative attractions. They provided a place for people to swim without having to travel the long miles to the beach. One such pool, Kennywood Park Pool in Pittsburgh, opened in 1925 and was . . . — Map (db m3227) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo’s Art Deco Arcade
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
Beginning in 1940, a new Art Deco arcade was added to Glen Echo park. Designed by the firm of Edward Schoeppe of Philadelphia, also the chief architect of the Crystal Pool and Spanish Ballroom, the arcade was constructed in stages from 1940 to . . . — Map (db m3231) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Minnehaha Creek
Near Oxford Road south of Macarthur Boulevard, on the left when traveling south.
This deep ravine and rocky creep are typical of streams in the Potomac River Valley. Today Minnehaha Creek flows freely through Glen Echo Park. Changes made to the creek during the past 100 years mirror the history of Glen Echo Park. The . . . — Map (db m131202) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Changing Face of Glen Echo
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
Lost Attractions. From its beginnings as a National Chautauqua to its years as an amusement park, Glen Echo has experienced countless changes. Some of the old Glen Echo Park remains, but much of it has not survived. Many old amusements, like . . . — Map (db m3228) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Clara Barton House
On MacArthur Boulevard at Goldsboro Road (Maryland Route 614) on MacArthur Boulevard.
Early headquarters of the American Red Cross and home of Clara Barton, founder and First President, who lived here until her death in 1912. Located just south of this marker, the house had an unusual interior of Steamboat Gothic design with railed . . . — Map (db m303) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Clara Barton TrailClara Barton National Historic Site
Near Oxford Road west of MacArthur Boulevard, on the left when traveling south.
Did you know a heroine lived right here in Glen Echo, Maryland? Fearless, selfless. and determined, Clara Barton dedicated her life to helping others. Know as the “Angel of the Battlefield” during the Civil War and founder of the . . . — Map (db m104015) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Glen Echo Park YurtsHow They Got Here and What Goes On Inside Them
Near MacArthur Boulevard at Goldsboro Road (Maryland Route 614).
Yurts Around the World. These interesting and unusual buildings function as studios and classrooms in Glen Echo Park. Yurts have a long history. In Mongolia, yurts have been practical homes for thousands of years. In fact the word yurt . . . — Map (db m37571) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Hall of PhilosophyGlen Echo Park
Near MacArthur Boulevard.
If you were in this spot in 1891, you would have seen a two-story building nestled in trees overlooking the Potomac River and Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. The Hall of Philosophy was part of the National Chautauqua Assembly at Glen Echo, which offered . . . — Map (db m104011) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Roller Coasters of Glen Echo Amusement Park
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
Roller Coasters. The first primitive version of a roller coaster called the “Flying Mountain” emerged in Russia in the 1400’s. Americans encountered their first taste of a roller coaster-like thrill ride in 1827 when Josiah . . . — Map (db m3226) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Trolley Parks In America
Near MacArthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
The Early Trolley Park. In 1888 in Richmond, Virginia, Frank Sprague revolutionized American travel with his invention of the electric trolley. A new fast and economical transportation dawned. Suburban communities, like Glen Echo, soon opened . . . — Map (db m24185) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Great Falls — A Lift LockChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
On MacArthur Blvd..
When a river, such as the Potomac, was too swift or shallow for navigation, shippers built canals with lift locks along the river course. The C & O Canal consists of flat stretches of water connected by lift locks. The use of locks enabled the canal . . . — Map (db m100771) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Hyattstown — HyattstownUninvited Guests — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) at Hyattstown Mill Road, on the right when traveling north on Frederick Road.
The roadside village of Hyattstown became the front line when Confederate cavalry stationed to the north in Urbana clashed with Union cavalry reconnoitering from Clarksburg to the south. On the evening of September 8, 1862, Maj. Alonzo W. Adams and . . . — Map (db m1727) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Hyattstown — Hyattstown Mill
On Hyattstown Mill Road.
A number of grist and saw mills operated on this site from the late 1700s to the mid 1930s. Due to seasonal changes in the water level, Little Bennett Creek proved unreliable as a constant source of power to turn the water wheel. Milling efficiency . . . — Map (db m94355) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Kensington — Dedicated To Those From Kensington Who Served Their Country In The Armed ForcesTown of Kensington, Maryland
On Armory Avenue north of Baltimore Street, on the left when traveling north.
Dedicated to those from Kensington who served their country in the Armed Forces — Map (db m116020) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Kensington — Millstone From Alfred Ray's Property
Near Kensington Parkway south of Frederick Avenue.
The millstone is from a private mill which was located on the stream along Kensington Parkway. The home was located south of Saul Road. — Map (db m116021) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Kensington — Photos of Historic Kensington
On Connecticut Avenue (Maryland Route 185) north of Knowles Avenue, on the right.
1. c. 1901 Kensington B & O Railway Station. [Photo by Frank Chapman] The Kensington Train Station was built in 1891 and still services the Metropolitan branch of MARC Trains. 2. c. 1949 3758 & 3762 Howard Avenue These buildings were renovated . . . — Map (db m116023) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Laytonsville — Layton House
On Brink Road west of Laytonsville Road (Maryland Route 108), on the left when traveling west.
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior circa 1793 — Map (db m133982) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Laytonsville — Rolling RidgeCirca - 1790
On Brink Road at Rolling Ridge Lane, on the right when traveling west on Brink Road.
North of this monument, Robert Ober, a wealthy merchant built his home. A long tree-lined approach adds prominence to this 1½ story brick Georgian-style residence. This Tidewater style of architecture is rarely found in Montgomery County. . . . — Map (db m72538) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Martinsburg — Warren Historic Site
On Whites Ferry Road (State Road 107) at Martinsburg Road on Whites Ferry Road.
The Warren Historic Site is dedicated to preserving three historic buildings erected at this location on the grounds of the Warren United Methodist Church. These buildings served as the nucleus of a small rural African-American community known as . . . — Map (db m4613) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Martinsburg — White’s Ford
On Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107) at Martinsburg Road, on the left when traveling west on Whites Ferry Road.
About 2 miles northwest was White’s Ford. This Potomac crossing was used by Gen. R. E. Lee entering Maryland in September, 1862, and Generals J.E.B. Stuart and Jubal A. Early returning to Virginia in 1862 and 1864, respectively. — Map (db m811) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Montgomery Village — Middlebrook Mills
Near North Frederick Avenue (Maryland Route 355) north of Game Preserve Road, on the right when traveling north.
Abraham Faw built a grist mill here on Seneca Creek about 1790. By 1795 the mill had four pairs of grinding stones. There was also a saw mill and a tavern on the site. The mills were bought in 1797 by James McCubbin Lingan who named the area . . . — Map (db m2804) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Montgomery Village — Watkins Mill
On Watkins Mill Road north of Apple Ridge Road, on the right when traveling north.
A water-powered grist mill was located here on Seneca Creek as early as 1783 on property known as Gray’s Neck owned by Adin Gray. In the mid-19th century, it was operated first by Levi Snyder, then by Remis Snyder as both a grist and saw mill and . . . — Map (db m121234) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), North Bethesda — "Alluvium" is an artwork by Jim Sanborn
Near Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355) south of Executive Boulevard, on the left when traveling north.
The following is a list of the translations, transcriptions, and sources for the texts on the screen John Smith 1612 AD "There is but one entrance by sea into this country, and that is at the mouth of a very goodly bay, 18 or 20 miles . . . — Map (db m113848) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), North Bethesda — 11333 Woodglen Drive
On Woodglen Drive north of Executive Boulevard, on the right when traveling north.
On this building, 11333 Woodglen Drive, the first "Green Roof" in Montgomery County was built in 2004. This roof provides for reduced energy consumption in the building and also provides for a natural filtration and . . . — Map (db m113838) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), North Bethesda — Historic Montrose School
Near Montrose Parkway.
Constructed 1909 Designed by Thomas C. Groomes as a two room schoolhouse for white elementary students in rural communities of Montrose and Randolph. Used coal-burning stove, water from a well, and outhouses. Students planted the red cedar . . . — Map (db m67063) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), North Bethesda — Old Spring House & Pool of Bethesda
Near Wood Road 0.6 miles north of Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355), on the left when traveling north.
Originally, the grounds of the National Naval Medical Center was a rural farm with a small pond fed by a natural spring. The picture to the right is the original spring house located on the property. the pool and the tiny stream reminded the . . . — Map (db m75845) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Norwood — African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring
On Park Police Drive near Ednor Road, on the left when traveling east.
Sandy Spring has had large Quaker and African American populations since its founding in the 1720s. Encouraged by their regional and national Religious Society, most Sandy Spring Quakers had freed their slaves by about 1820, creating a . . . — Map (db m67633) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Norwood — The Holland Red Door Store
On Layhill Road (Maryland Route 182) at Norwood Road, on the right when traveling south on Layhill Road.
In 1860 James Holland purchased this land and built the general store that still stands today. Located at the intersection of the toll roads to Baltimore and Olney, the store was at the heart of a community that became known as Holland's Corner. . . . — Map (db m49924) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Norwood — Woodlawn
On Park Police / Woodlawn Drive, on the right when traveling north.
  Built by the Thomas Family in the early 1800s,this property, formerly known as Woodlawn, has national significance. In 1816, Samuel and Anna Thomas established a Friends Boarding School here. Francis Scott Key frequently visited his daughters who . . . — Map (db m67596) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Olney — Higgins Tavern
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) at Silo Inn Lane, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
From Colonial times until the late 19th century, taverns occupied almost every crossroad and trading center. They were the center of life for rural communities. This is where mail was received, goods were traded, travelers slept, newspapers were . . . — Map (db m72582) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Olney — Olney HouseAlso known as “Little Olney”
Near Olney Sandy Spring Road (Maryland Route 108) east of Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97), on the right when traveling east.
Built by Whitson Canby c. 1800. Roger Brooke acquired the property for his daughter Sarah and her husband Dr. Charles Farquhar in 1822. They named the home after the town of Olney, England, the hometown of their favorite poet William Cowpers. When . . . — Map (db m371) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Olney — SpringhouseOlney House
On Olney-Sandy Spring Road (Maryland Route 108) east of Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97), on the right when traveling east.
This springhouse was constructed as an outbuilding of the Olney House (circa 1800). This one was restored and preserved by the Buffingtons in 2003. Before the invention of electric refrigeration, springhouses were common throughout rural areas and . . . — Map (db m129440) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — An Ideal Crossing
Reported missing.
The Potomac River is calm and narrow here, making it an ideal location for a ferry crossing. In 1791 Edwards Ferry began to operate here, connecting Maryland farmers to the Goose Creek Canal in Virginia and to the Leesburg markets. The ferry closed . . . — Map (db m78350) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — At the Junction of War and Peace:Lockhouse 25 and Edwards Ferry — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park —
On Edwards Ferry Road 0.1 miles west of River Road, on the right when traveling west.
In the mid-nineteenth century, Lockhouse 25 and the surrounding community of Edwards Ferry, Maryland, reaped the advantages of their locations. With the nearby river lock, the area served as the bustling entry point to the C&O Canal for agricultural . . . — Map (db m78348) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Edward’s Ferry
On Edwards Ferry Road at River Road on Edwards Ferry Road.
A major crossing of the Potomac River guarded by Union troops throughout the Civil War. In Oct. 1861 a Union unit crossed during the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, but did not participate. From Dec. 1861 to March 1862 the base of balloon operations of . . . — Map (db m1136) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Edwards FerryStrategic Crossing — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Edward's Ferry Road, on the right.
Gen. Joseph Hooker’s 75,000-man, seven-corps Army of the Potomac crossed the Potomac River here, June 25-27, 1863, on the way to Gettysburg. The army crossed on two 1,400-foot-long pontoon bridges. Heavy rains during those three days made the single . . . — Map (db m33741) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Historic Poolesville
On West Willard Road, on the left when traveling south.
Located on the doorstep of the Confederacy and possessing, what was then, a sizable population, the Town of Poolesville was a strategic military crossroads during the Civil War. Union Soldiers were encamped in Poolesville throughout the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m2113) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleWarm Reception — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Fisher Avenue / Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107) at Elgin Road / Beallsville Road (Route 109), on the right on Fisher Avenue / Whites Ferry Road.
Located at the intersection of the two main roads, mid-19th century Poolesville was Montgomery County’s second-largest town. Its residents had decidedly secessionist tendencies and many sons fighting for the South. In the fall of 1862, as the . . . — Map (db m1729) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleStrategic Union Encampment — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near Fisher Avenue / Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107), on the right when traveling west.
During the Civil War, more soldiers passed through Poolesville than any other Montgomery County town. Union forces occupied this bustling village throughout most of the war, protecting the strategic road network, lines of communication and . . . — Map (db m1730) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Poolesville Veterans Memorial
On Fisher Avenue (Maryland Route 107) west of Milford Mill Road, on the right when traveling west.
Dedicated to all those who have served our country and our community Town of Poolesville (Founded 1867) Montgomery County, Maryland May 26, 2003Map (db m131598) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — St. Peter's Church
On Whites Ferry Road (State Highway 107), on the right when traveling east.
Ad Gloriam Dei St. Peter's ChurchFounded as Monocacy Chapel, a Chapel of Ease. Upon a site two and one half miles North of this point about 1737. The First Church West of the Great Seneca Creek in the Province of Maryland. This Structure was . . . — Map (db m33825) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — The Civil War at Poolesville
On Fisher Avenue / White's Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107) at W Willard Road, on the left when traveling east on Fisher Avenue / White's Ferry Road.
Famed commander, Lt. Col. E.V. (“Lige”) White, of the 35th BN Va. Cavalry C.S.A., and many members of his command were natives of this area. This town became the headquarters of Union Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone’s 12,000-man corps of . . . — Map (db m2112) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — The Historic St. Paul Community Church
On Sugarland Road at Sugarland Lane on Sugarland Road.
The Historic St. Paul Community Church is the heart of the Sugarland Forest Community established by freed slaves after emancipation. Patriarchs William Taylor, Patrick Hebron, Jr. and John H. Diggs, as trustees purchased this parcel of land from . . . — Map (db m66469) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — The Old Bank Building
Near Fisher Avenue.
A Poolseville landmark, the Old Bank was built in 1910. Its architectural style is referred to as “vaguely classical” and was typical of many of the town's structures. Most of the historic downtown was destroyed by fire in 1923. The . . . — Map (db m106997) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Welcome to Poolesville
On Fyffe Road north of Fisher Avenue (Maryland Route 107), on the left when traveling south.
Poolesville is a town of unique charm, a special place strategically located at a crossroads in western Montgomery County, not only one of geography but also where the past intersects the present, agriculture connects with commerce, and rural beauty . . . — Map (db m131597) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Boats Passing ByChesapeake and Ohio Canal Historical Park
Near MacArthur Blvd.
In days past, while standing on the edge of the canal one would see a variety of boats float by. During the peak operating years of the C&O canal in the 1870's, as many as 550 freight boats were in use on the canal carrying tons of coal from . . . — Map (db m103042) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Creating a National Park[Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park]
On C&O Canal Towpath south of Great Falls Road Climb.
“It is a refuge, a place of retreat, a long stretch of quiet and peace at the Capital …”William O. Douglas. Look around you. The park you stand in exists because people cared. In January 1954, Justice William O. . . . — Map (db m49848) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Gold Mining in Maryland
On River Road (Maryland Route 190) west of Falls Road (Maryland Route 189).
Most gold found in Maryland came from the Potomac area. Mining operations began shortly after gold was discovered near Great Falls during the Civil War and continued until 1940; incidental prospecting continued until 1951. From 1884–1940 the . . . — Map (db m1121) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Great Falls of the Potomac
On Falls Road at MacArthur Boulevard, on the right when traveling south on Falls Road.
One of the most picturesque spots in Maryland. George Washington came here many times and built canal locks on the Virginia side to make the river navigable for his "Potomac Company." — Map (db m70177) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Great Falls Tavern — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park —
On C&O Canal Tow Path west of MacArthur Blvd./Great Falls Road Climb.
Panel 1 - plaque on the C&O tow path: Life was very different around the Great Falls Tavern during the canal era. The building before you began as a small lockhouse and was added onto twice until it became what you see today. The area . . . — Map (db m71604) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Lockhouse 22
On Pennyfield Lock Road, on the right when traveling south.
If walls could talk then Lockhouse 22 could tell some tales. One might hear about President Grover Cleveland who sought refuge from the pressures of the White HOuse by coming here on fishing trips. Or perhaps the lockhouse would tell of one . . . — Map (db m28302) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Olmsted Island — [Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park] —
On the Olmstead Island Trail west of the C&O Canal Towpath.
Named in honor of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. 1870 - 1957 Illustrious landscape architect and advocate of the preservation of natural scenery who, as an original member of the National Capital Park and Planning Commission from 1926 . . . — Map (db m49829) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Potomac Cemetery and Church Grounds
Near Falls Road.
1717 Captain John Presbyterian Meeting House 1793 Graves of Rev. James Hunt and Wife Ruth 1854 Methodists begin & Build Potomac Chapel 1865 Potomac Chapel School erected — One of first free public schools in Montgomery County. 1969 . . . — Map (db m106440) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Potomac River— Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park —
Near Swains Lock Road.
Human habitation in the Potomac River Basin has existed for 9,000 years, according to archeological evidence. The name "Potomac" derives from the Algonquian word "patawomeke," which means "trading place." The first English settlement, St. Mary's . . . — Map (db m61574) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — The Edgar Perry HouseBuilt in 1902
Near River Road at Falls Road.
When Edgar was born on May 3, 1871, his father Thomas was a partner with Winfield Offutt in a mercantile operation at the intersection of River and Falls Road, then known as “Offutt's Crossroads.“ By the year 1880, when “Potomac . . . — Map (db m106484) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — The Floods
Near MacArthur Blvd 1.2 miles west of Falls Road (Route 189).
Structures such as this stop-lock were designed to divert flood waters from the canal. Wooden planks were dropped in to slots, forming a dam which diverted rushing waters along a stone levee and back into the Potomac. Although this stop-lock . . . — Map (db m68287) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — The Maryland MineChesapeake and Ohio Canal Historical Park
Near Falls Road.
The building in front of you was a processing mill, where gold was extracted from quartz. The quartz was dug in the Maryland Mine, one of over 30 mines that once dotted the landscape here. During the Civil War a Union soldier assigned to guard . . . — Map (db m103296) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Traveler's Impressions of Montgomery County1861 - 1865
Near River Road (Maryland Route 190) 1.6 miles east of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the right when traveling east.
If you were a marching soldier, what would have been your impression of Montgomery County during the Civil War? While the built environment may not have impressed travelers, the variety of natural resources in this area garnered admiration. . . . — Map (db m74879) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Potomac — Washington Aqueduct
Near MacArthur Blvd/Great Falls Road Climb east of the C&O Canal Towpath when traveling south.
. . . — Map (db m54961) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — “Out of Robb’s Window, Montgomery County Court House.”Lost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) east of South Washington Street, on the right when traveling east.
Architect Benjamin Latrobe came to “Montgomery Court House” in 1811 hoping that the fresh air would help his ailing young son recover his health. He stayed at Adam Robb’s tavern that may have been located on Lot 4 on Jefferson Street . . . — Map (db m92) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 1803 Plan of Rockville and Boundary StoneLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Vinson Street at Maryland Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Vinson Street.
Rockville began when Owen's Ordinary, an inn and tavern, was established in this area around 1750. It functioned as the seat of lower Frederick County and in 1776 became the seat of Montgomery County when it was created. In 1784, William P. Williams . . . — Map (db m117874) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 1891 Red Brick CourthouseMontgomery County
Near Courthouse Square near Washington Street at West Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Montgomery County's third courthouse. Built in 1891 the "Old Red Brick Courthouse" has become the symbol and architectural monument of old Rockville. Designated a historic building on July 19, 1965 by the Montgomery County Historical Society, Inc. — Map (db m37578) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Autre - St. Mary’s PlantationHome of Caleb Polleckefield Litton: 1720-1763
On Linthicum Street.
Caleb Litton’s “Plantation” The Headstones in this cemetery are what remain of a family graveyard begun by Caleb Litton and his descendants on a 472-acre farm. Litton was one of the very first settlers of what today is . . . — Map (db m135425) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 17 — Baseball FieldNorth Washington and Hungerford Drive — SITE #17 —
The practice field for Rockville's African American baseball team was located between North Washington Street and present-day Hungerford Drive. The team played around the county and in Washington, D.C. from the early 1900s through the . . . — Map (db m102121) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall Dawson HouseRockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour - Site #7 — Location: 103 West Montgomery Avenue —
On West Middle Lane, on the right when traveling east.
Upton Beall, wealthy landowner and clerk of the court, owned 25 slaves when he died in 1827. Although the family did not purchase additional slaves after his death, the three Beall sisters owned 52 individuals by 1860. The Beall family did not . . . — Map (db m137692) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson HouseSlavery in Rockville — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near West Middle Lane west of North Adams Street, on the right when traveling east.
In April 1862, Congress abolished slavery in Washington, D.C. District slaveholders were eligible for monetary compensation when they manumitted (freed) their slaves. Because the Beall sisters held several slaves who worked in the District, they . . . — Map (db m5416) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 7 — Beall-Dawson House100 West Montgomery Avenue — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On West Middle Lane west of South Adams Street, on the left when traveling west.
Upton Beall, wealthy landowner and Clerk of Court, owned 25 slaves when he died in 1827. After Upton Beall died, his family did not purchase additional slaves, however, by 1860 the Beall family owned 52 slaves. The Beall family did not sell . . . — Map (db m43630) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson House and ParkLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On North Adam Street near West Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Reported missing.
The Beall-Dawson property originally extended from Montgomery Avenue west to Forest Avenue and north to Martins Lane. The house was built in 1815 by Upton Beall, Clerk of the Montgomery County Court. It is a 2 1/2 story brick Federal-style home . . . — Map (db m137624) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson House and ParkExplore Early Rockville Walking Tour - Site # 11 — Location 103 West Montgomery Avenue —
Near West Montgomery Avenue.
The Beall-Dawson property originally extended from Montgomery Avenue west to Forest Avenue and north to Martins Lane. The house was built in 1815 by Upton Beall, clerk of the Montgomery County Court. The 2 1/2-story brick, Federal-style home is . . . — Map (db m137626) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Boundary Stone
On Vinson Street at Maryland Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Vinson Street.
This stone, dated 1803 and located on this site, marked the southeast corner of the original town of Rockville. The letters "B.R." on its face stand for "Beginning of Rockville" — Map (db m117873) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Christ Episcopal ChurchLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On South Washington Street near Vinson Street, on the right when traveling south.
The first Episcopal church in or near Rockville was built in 1739 on a two-acre parcel of land, part of which is now the Rockville Cemetery. It was constructed of clapboards and logs and was called both the "Chapel of Ease" and Rock Creek Chapel. . . . — Map (db m91) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Christ Episcopal ChurchVestrymen Arrested — Gettysburg Campaign —
On South Washington Street near Vinson Street, on the right when traveling south.
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, 5,000 of Confederate Gen J.E.B. Stuart's cavarlymen rode into Rockville and arrested Union supporters. They sought merchant John H. Higgins at his home, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church (across . . . — Map (db m37574) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 15 — Clinton A.M.E. Zion ChurchSouthwest corner of North Washington Street and Beall Avenue — Site #15 —
On North Washington Street at Beall Avenue when traveling north on North Washington Street.
In 1867, several of Rockville's African American families left Jerusalem Methodist Episcopal Church to start the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Zion Church under the leadership of Reverend Charles Pipkins. In 1890, Pipkins and his . . . — Map (db m101921) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Court House Square"Burning with Enthusiasm" — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Courthouse Square near Washington Street and West Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville, the Montgomery County seat, on June 28, 1863, to a boisterous reception. One soldier described “a spectacle which was truly pleasing . . . It was Sunday, . . . — Map (db m65) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Dawson Farm - 1840-1979Dawson Farm Park - Rockville’s History in Your Own Backyard
Near Ritchie Parkway.
Dawson Family History Thomas Dawson (1708-1800) left his family home in Charles County, Maryland, in 1750 and established Dawsonville in what was Frederick County, but later became Montgomery County. The Dawsons were a prominent . . . — Map (db m135532) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 4 — Dr. James Anderson House100 South Washington Street — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On South Washington Street at East Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) on South Washington Street.
Long before the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, some enslaved people freed themselves by escaping to Canada. In 1856, Alfred Homer walked and ran more than 500 miles from this site to freedom, despite the dangers of the Fugitive Slave Law. . . . — Map (db m43557) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Dr. Thomas Sprigg Wootton(C. 1740-1789)
On Wootton Parkway when traveling north.
A local resident, member of Maryland's first Constitutional Convention and first speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, Wootton introduced a bill to divide Frederick County into three jurisdictions. The bill passed on September 6, 1776, . . . — Map (db m81911) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Early Rockville Residential AreaExplore Early Rockville Walking Tour — Location: North Adams Street and Middle Lane —
On North Adams Street at West Middle Lane, on the right when traveling north on North Adams Street.
The area of North Adams Street and Middle Lane contains four of the oldest surviving Rockville homes: 5, 101, and 106 N. Adams St., and the Beall-Dawson House at 103 W. Montgomery Ave. The 1793 portion of the house at 5 N. Adams St. is likely . . . — Map (db m137952) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 16 — Father Divine BirthplaceMiddle Lane — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On Middle Lane east of N. Washington Street, on the right when traveling west.
Father Divine was an influential and charismatic religious leader and founder of the International Peace Mission Movement. Father Divine was born in 1879 on Middle Lane as George Baker, Jr. and attended the Rockville and Jerusalem M.E. Church. . . . — Map (db m43491) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 10 — Galilean Temple200 North Washington Street — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On North Washington Street.
This was once a vital center of the African American community in Rockville: the Eureka Tabernacle Number 29 of the Order of the Galilean Fisherman.

Established in 1903, the Temple allowed Rockville's African American residents to work together . . . — Map (db m43567) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — George Washington Carver Junior CollegeEstablished 1950-51
Near Ivy League Lane.
Carver was the first accredited two-year junior college conducted under County Board of Education for post-secondary education of Negro students in Montgomery County. At the time, Lincoln High School, located in a historic black community in . . . — Map (db m106396) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
On Courthouse Square near Washington Street at West Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m73) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 2 — Gibbs v. Broome, et al/1931 Courthouse27 Courthouse Square — Rockville’s African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On Courthouse Square (W. Montgomery Ave.) west of Maryland Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Should you receive the same pay for doing the same work? William B. Gibbs, teacher and principal of the Rockville Colored Elementary School, thought so, but he had to take the issue to court. African American teachers had to meet the same . . . — Map (db m43474) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Glenview Mansion
Near Avery Road at Edmoston Drive.
. . . — Map (db m7718) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Haiti-Martin's Lane CommunityRockville, Maryland
On North Van Buren Street north of Dawson Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
This neighborhood was established in the 1830s by Samuel Martin, a free black man. Between 1864 & 1901, Margaret Beall deeded parcels of land south of Martin's Lane to her former slaves. Descendants of the original Martin, Wood, Ross, and Smith . . . — Map (db m129435) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 9 — Hebron House and Print Shop11 Wood Lane — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On Wood Lane west of North Washington Street, on the right when traveling west.
For over fifty years, Celestine and Jesse Hebron operated one of the most successful printing businesses in the county in this handcrafted building. Jesse Hebron started his printing business on Falls Road in 1932. After serving in World War II . . . — Map (db m43568) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Higgins HouseArresting Civilians — Gettysburg Campaign —
On West Middle Lane at North Adams Street, on the right when traveling west on West Middle Lane.
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, Confederate cavalrymen arrived at merchant John Higgins' house to arrest him, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church. Instead they captured Eblen, a 17 year-old Union soldier recuperating here. When . . . — Map (db m102790) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 5 — Hungerford TavernWest Jefferson and South Washington Street — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) at South Washington Street on West Jefferson Street.
Hungerford Tavern was most likely operated by the tavern owner's African American slaves. African American slaves traveling with their masters were expected to care for them if they became too rowdy or drunk at taverns. A meeting place for . . . — Map (db m43560) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Hungerford TavernLost Rockville -- 1801 to 1850
Hungerford Tavern was the site of some of the most important events in the history of Montgomery County. Three months prior to the Continental Congress in 1774, local citizens met at Hungerford Tavern to protest oppressive actions of the British . . . — Map (db m137709) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Hungerford Tavern SiteJune 11, 1774
Near S. Washington Street.
On above date aroused Patriots resolved that every lawful means be used to procure relief from oppressions of the English Parliament and that the most effectual way to secure American Freedom would be to break off all commerce with Great Britain. . . . — Map (db m66403) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Hungerford Tavern/Susan Russell HouseExplore Early Rockville Walking Tour - Site #5 — Location: Northwest Corner of West Jefferson and South Washington Street —
On South Washington Street at West Jefferson Street, on the right when traveling south on South Washington Street.
Charles Hungerford's tavern was the site of important events in the early history of Montgomery County. Three months prior to the Continental Congress in 1774, local citizens met at Hungerford Tavern to protest oppressive actions of the British . . . — Map (db m137723) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 8 — Jerusalem - Mount Pleasant Church and Parsonage21 & 17 Wood Lane — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On Wood Lane.
Racial tensions between African American and white church members peaked immediately before the Civil War. Pro-slavery parishioners joined the M. E. Church South in 1863. By 1868 the predominately African American M. E. Church North owned this . . . — Map (db m32146) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — John C. Brown Memorial Bridge
On Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355) at Edmonston Drive, on the right when traveling north on Rockville Pike.
The John C. Brown (Corp’l U. S. Army) Memorial Bridge Dedicated August 26, 1950 To the memory of the first Maryland soldier killed in action in Korea June 30, 1950 — Map (db m90) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Lucy Simpson's Rockville Institute
Near North Adams Street at Wood Lane.
1887 Original home of Lucy Simpson's Rockville Institute a private school known as the “Little Red Hut” ——— • ——— Owned by the Darby family from 1914 - 1979. Restored and renovated . . . — Map (db m102789) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock and His Men
On Courthouse Square near East Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28), on the right when traveling south.
To commemorate the encampment in Maryland of Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock and his men at Owen's Ordinary, now Rockville, April 20, 1755. This stone is placed by the Janet Montgomery Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Mrs. Morris L. Croxall, . . . — Map (db m77) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Mattie J.T. Stepanek Peace Garden
On Piccard Drive west of Pleasant Drive, on the right when traveling west.
"Peace is possible ... it can begin simply, over a game of chess and a cup of tea." Mattie J.T. Stepanek July 17, 1990 - June 22, 2004 Mattie enjoyed public speaking and worked with Former President and First Lady Jimmy and . . . — Map (db m129439) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Montgomery Avenue and Washington StreetLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Washington Street north of E. Montgomery Avenue (Courthouse Square), on the right when traveling north. Reported permanently removed.
Rockville grew from a convenient crossroads meeting place in the 1750s to become the legal and market center of the county. The tiny village was selected as the seat of local government in 1776 for its central location and the presence of taverns . . . — Map (db m138805) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Montgomery County Court HouseLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Courthouse Squre near Washington Street and West Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
There have been four court houses in Rockville since it was established as the County seat in 1776. Court was originally held at Hungerford Tavern. A frame court house existed in the late 18th century but was sufficiently outgrown by 1810 to . . . — Map (db m101964) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Montgomery County JailLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Maryland Avenue at Fleet Street, on the right when traveling north on Maryland Avenue.
In 1777, seven commissioners were appointed to purchase a plot of land not exceeding four acres, for building a court house and prison for Montgomery County. In 1777, both court and jail were located in the former Hungerford Tavern on South . . . — Map (db m330) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 11 — Mr. T’s200 North Washington Street — Rockville’s African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On North Washington Street at Beall Avenue on North Washington Street.
After being made to wait while five white patrons who came in after him were served, George “T.” Johnson opened Mr. T’s as a store catering to African American clientele. Taverns in Rockville were the only businesses that were . . . — Map (db m32141) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Near This Spot Lived and Lies Buried Jeremiah Crabbe(1760–1800)
On Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) south of Indianola Drive / Watkins Pond Boulevard, on the left when traveling south.
Officer, 4th Battalion, Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Brigadier General of Maryland Militia, 1794; member of 4th United States Congress, 1795–96. — Map (db m20931) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — North Adams Street and Middle Lane Residential AreaLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On West Middle Lane at North Adams Street, on the right when traveling west on West Middle Lane. Reported permanently removed.
The area at North Adams Street and Middle Lane has four of the oldest surviving Rockville homes: 101, 106, and 5 North Adams, and the Beall-Dawson House. The 1793 portion of the house at 5 North Adams is probably the oldest structure in . . . — Map (db m137953) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Preserving a Community ResourceRockville's Pumphouse
On South Horners Lane.
In 1896, after the election of Mayor Joseph Reading on the Water Works ticket, the Mayor and Council of Rockville approved plans and specifications for a waterworks and electric light plant. The plant was intended to supplement and eventually . . . — Map (db m109686) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Prettyman HouseConfederates in Rockville — Gettysburg Campaign —
On West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) near South Van Buren Street, on the right.
From his home, E. Barrett Prettyman, a prominent Rockville citizen and educator, watched approximately 5,000 Confederate cavalrymen ride into Rockville in three columns on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Like many other Montgomery County residents, Prettyman . . . — Map (db m37575) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 6 — Prettyman House104 West Jefferson Street — Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour —
For many African Americans emancipation from slavery meant transitioning from a household slave to a paid domestic servant.

The Johnson-Prettyman family lived in this 1841 house for five generations. During their ownership they transitioned . . . — Map (db m56261) HM

Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 1 — Red Brick Courthouse29 Courthouse Square — Rockville’s African American Heritage Walking Tour —
On Courthouse Square (West Montgomery Ave.) west of Maryland Avenue.
After the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln and Congress created the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands to aid newly freed African Americans. By the time it closed in 1872, the Bureau had provided assistance to four million former slaves . . . — Map (db m43471) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Richard Montgomery1738 - 1775
On East Jefferson Street west of Maryland Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
Born in Ireland; served in the British Army in the French & Indian War. Joined the American Revolution as the most experienced general in the Continental Army. Led the invasion of Canada where he was killed in the Battle of Quebec, becoming the . . . — Map (db m50480) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville
On Courthouse Square near North and South Washington Street, on the left when traveling west.
Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's Confederate Cavalry occupied Rockville June 28, 1863, and captured 150 U.S. wagons along the Washington Road. From here they marched to Gettysburg. In July, 1864, Gen. Jubal Early passed through Rockville on his way to and from . . . — Map (db m59) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — RockvilleCounty Seat of Montgomery (formerly part of Frederick) County
On South Washington Street at West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28), on the left when traveling north on South Washington Street.
. . . — Map (db m60) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville AcademyLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
Near South Adams Street at West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28).
In 1805, the Maryland General Assembly appointed a commission to raise money for a school lot and a fire engine for Rockville. The Rockville Academy was chartered and authorized to hire teachers in 1809. In 1812 and 1813, a number of lots were . . . — Map (db m94) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Baptist Church and CemeteryLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) at West Montgomery Avenue, on the left when traveling east on West Jefferson Street.
In 1823, the deacons of the Bethel Baptist Church church acquired a half-acre lot at this site to erect a church and provide a burial ground. The original church was replaced in 1864, but a half century later, the Baptists demolished it and built a . . . — Map (db m37576) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Business DistrictLocation: Montgomery Avenue and Washington Street — Explore Early Rockville Walking Tour - Site #8 —
On North Washington Street at Montgomery Avenue, on the right when traveling north on North Washington Street.
Rockville grew from a convenient crossroads meeting place in the 1750s to become the legal and market center of agricultural Montgomery County. The tiny village was selected as the seat of local government in 1776 for its central location at the . . . — Map (db m138804) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Methodist Episcopal Church - Jerusalem/Mount PleasantLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Wood Lane near North Washington Street, on the right when traveling west.
Rockville was an early center of Methodism in Montgomery County. Methodists first met in private homes with occasional visits from a "circuit rider" minister. In 1835, the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church purchased lot 82 of the Original . . . — Map (db m43555) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 9 — Rockville StationPeerless Rockville
Near Church Street.
1873 Rockville Station Metropolitan Branch Baltimore and Ohio Railroad ──────────────────────── . . . — Map (db m108317) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Town Square
On Gibbs Street at East Middle Lane, on the right when traveling south on Gibbs Street.
In 1784 William Prather Williams divided part of his farm into 85 building lots, making “Williamsburgh” the first subdivision in Rockville. § 15 Cemeteries can be found with Rockville's borders. The oldest known burial — . . . — Map (db m102013) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Town Square
On East Middle Lane at Maryland Avenue when traveling west on East Middle Lane.
Rockville started in the 1750s as a tiny Village Crossroads. It was called Owens Ordinary, Hungerford's Tavern, Montgomery Court House, Williamsburgh, and finally in 1803 Rockville. § Route 355 began as an Indian path that later became a . . . — Map (db m102370) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Town Square
On Bealle Street at Maryland Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Bealle Street.
General Edward Braddock and his troops camped in Rockville in 1755 on their way to Fort Duquesne during the French and Indian War. § In 1774, local residents passed the Hungerford Resolves in protest against British taxation policy in the . . . — Map (db m102421) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Town Square
On Gibbs Street at Beall Avenue on Gibbs Street.
When Montgomery County was created in 1776, the village today known as Rockville was selected as the seat of local government. Since that time, five court houses have been built in Courthouse Square. § Postal Service began in Montgomery . . . — Map (db m102844) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 12 & 14 — Rockville’s First Colored SchoolsRockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour
On North Washington Street north of Beall Avenue.
Rockville's First Colored School 246 North Washington Street In March, 1867, twenty African Americans pledged to support a school by taking responsibility for money "as may be necessary to pay the board and washing of the teacher and . . . — Map (db m43556) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville's Pump HouseThe Growth of Rockville's Water and Power Services
On South Horners Lane.
The Pump House was built in 1897 under the guidance of Mayor Joseph Reading, the town druggist who was elected on the “Water Works Ticket.” Known as “Rockville Electric Light and Water Works,” it was an important step in the . . . — Map (db m108252) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rocky Glen Farm / Dawson Farm: 1840-1980Dawson Farm Park - Rockville’s History in Your Own Backyard
Near Ritchie Parkway.
The Dawson Family named their farm “Rocky Glen” because of the landscape and the massive outcroppings of white quartzite rock, the glen was once shaded by a grove of huge chestnut trees, but the trees were lost to a blight in the early . . . — Map (db m135757) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rocky Glen Farm / Dawson Farmhouse: Built 1874Dawson Farm Park – Rockville’s History in Your Backyard
Near Ritchie Parkway.
Lawrence A. Dawson (1807-1875), was born in nearby Dawsonville, Maryland. He came to Rockville to study law and served in the Maryland House of Delegates. In 1840, he purchased this land from Benjamin Forrest, who later became his law partner. In . . . — Map (db m135502) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rocky Glen Farm/Dawson Farmhouse: Built 1912Dawson Farm Park - Rockville’s History in Your Own Backyard
Henry (Hal) Dawson, - son of Lawrence A. and Mary Kiger Dawson, left Rockville in 1885 for the Dakota territory, where he amassed a fortune as a cattleman. Hal returned to Rocky Glen with his wife Frances (Fannie) Williams Dawson and their four . . . — Map (db m135560) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Saint Mary’s ChurchLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Viers Mill Road (Maryland Route 28) at Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling west on Viers Mill Road.
St. Mary’s Church, built in 1817, is the oldest church still in use in Rockville. Rockville was chosen for the church location for its relatively large concentration of Catholics, it central location, and its prominence as the County seat. St. . . . — Map (db m61) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 4 — Saint Mary's Catholic ChurchPeerless Rockville
Near Veirs Mill Road.
1817 Historic Saint Mary's Catholic Church and Cemetery Original cost: $4,000.00 Renovations: 1885   │   1929 1889   │   1981 No. 4 — Map (db m108322) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — 13 — Snowden Funeral Home
On North Washington Street.
A hearse drawn by four white horses was a hallmark of the Snowden Funeral Home, the first African American-owned funeral home in Montgomery County.

George Russell Snowden started the family business in 1918 in Howard County. In 1926, he brought . . . — Map (db m32143) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Stonestreet Medical MuseumConflicting Loyalties
Near West Middle Lane near North Adams Street, on the right when traveling east.
Of the four presidential candidates in 1860, Abraham Lincoln received only 50 of Montgomery County's 2429 votes. Some of Rockville's 365 residents surrendered government jobs in Washington, refusing to sign the Oath of Loyalty, rather than face . . . — Map (db m102181) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Bell Tower BuildingRockville - Founded 1801
Near West Jefferson Street at North Adams Street.
The Bell Tower Building, formerly the Rockville Christian Church, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior, under provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. In . . . — Map (db m138689) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Bingham-Brewer HouseLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On Great Falls Road (Maryland Route 189) at Potomac Street, on the right when traveling west on Great Falls Road.
This two-story Federal structure is significant for its architecture and for its personal associations. The house is one of only two pre-1830 brick structures still intact in Rockville. The front section is 24-feet high and 24-feet wide. It rests . . . — Map (db m226) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Confederate Monument
Near Courthouse Square. Reported permanently removed.
To Our Heroes of Montgomery Co. Maryland That We Through Life May Not Forget to Love The Thin Gray Line Erected A.D. 1913 1861 CSA 1865 — Map (db m106402) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Hay Drying ShedRockville's King Farm Farmstead Park
Near Grand Champion Drive near Piccard Drive.
William Lawson King and his family moved here in 1925. For over 60 years this property was part of their dairy operation, which was the largest in the county with 450 registered Holstein cows. At this farm, over 100 cows were milked twice daily, 365 . . . — Map (db m140435) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Prettyman HouseLost Rockville - 1801 to 1850
On West Jefferson Street (Maryland Route 28) at South Van Buren Street, on the right when traveling east on West Jefferson Street.
This house was built on a 13.5-acre lot on the outskirts of Rockville in 1842. A stone marking the southwest corner of the original 1803 Rockville Plan is between this house and the adjacent Rockville Academy grounds. Matilda Holland, widow of . . . — Map (db m74) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Typhoid in Rockville
On South Horners Lane.
During the 1913-1914 holiday season, 28 cases of typhoid fever were reported in Rockville and three people died. The new U.S. Public Health Service investigated, and identified the town's water system as the problem. Contaminated ground water . . . — Map (db m108254) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Veirs Mill
On Viers Mill Road (Maryland Route 586) near Twinbrook Parkway, on the right when traveling west.
Veirs Mill was built by Samuel Clark Veirs in 1838. It was operated by Veirs and Co., or Veirs and Bros., for 89 years. Known by many as Rock Creek Mills, it drew customers from Rockville and Mitchel's Crossroads (now Wheaton), through a route that . . . — Map (db m78) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Wootton's MillRockville's History in Your Own Backyard
Near Aintree Drive.
You are standing on the tract of land where Wootton's Mill once stood near Watts Branch stream. The gristmill was constructed and began operations in 1821. The saw and gristmill was powered by an overshot wheel, in which the weight of water . . . — Map (db m108378) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Sandy Spring — History of the Sandy Spring Friends Meeting House
On Meeting House Road, on the left when traveling south.
1753: Sandy Spring Friends Meeting established            on this site by three or four families who had            moved here from first Friends Meeting on            Western Shore of Chesapeake Bay. 1770: James Brooke . . . — Map (db m67674) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Sandy Spring — Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County1861-1865
Near Norwood Road.
The Civil War profoundly affected county residents because of their proximity to Washington, D.C. —the Union Capital— and Virginia, the northern reach of the Confederate States of America. No community in Montgomery County was immune to . . . — Map (db m104229) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Sandy Spring — Sandy Spring Friends Meeting Site
On Meeting House Road, on the left when traveling south.
1753 First Sandy Spring Meeting of Record of The Religious Society of Friends held in this grove 1817 Present Building Erected 1953 Bicentennial Commemoration by Sandy Spring Meeting United . . . — Map (db m67663) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Sandy Spring — The Sandy Spring
On Meeting House Road when traveling south.
The Sandy Spring community took its name from this spring, which provides fresh water filtered through the sandy soil. In 1745, the spring was located on what was once known as “Snowden's Manor” and later known as “Harewood”. . . . — Map (db m104248) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Sandy Spring — The Sandy Spring Ash Tree
Near Auburn Village Drive 0.4 miles south of Olney Sandy Spring Road (State Route 108), on the right when traveling south.
. . . — Map (db m131852) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery Countypost-1865
Near Old River Road.
In 1890, One of the 252 Civil War veterans still living in Montgomery County was Elias Price. The Department of Census interviewed Price and other Civil War veterans living in the county, recording critical details including which side of the war . . . — Map (db m118756) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Planetary Radio Emissions Discovery Site
On River Road west of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112).
In 1955 scientists Bernard Burke and Kenneth Franklin from the Carnegie Institution of Washington accidentally discovered naturally-generated radio waves from Jupiter using a 96-acre antenna array. The discovery led to greater understanding of . . . — Map (db m745) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Rowser’s Ford
On Violettes Lock Road at River Road (Maryland Route 190), on the left when traveling south on Violettes Lock Road.
This crossing of the Potomac River was used by Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart on the night of June 27, 1863, to enter Maryland on his ride around the Union army during the Gettysburg Campaign. — Map (db m665) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Rowser’s Ford5,000 Confederate Cavalrymen Crossed — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Rileys Lock Road south of River Road, on the right when traveling south.
On June 24, 1863, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, leaving 3,000 cavalrymen in Rectortown, Virginia, to monitor Federal activity, led three Confederate cavalry brigades to Haymarket. Encountering Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s corps marching north, Stuart sent . . . — Map (db m761) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca
On River Road at Tschiffely Mill Road, on the left when traveling west on River Road.
John Garrett laid out a town called Newport here in 1797 and gave away lots as prizes in a lottery, but a town did not actually appear until after 1830, when the C&O Canal was completed from Georgetown to Seneca Creek. The town was called Seneca. A . . . — Map (db m764) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — SenecaChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
On Riley's Lock Road.
Eleven aqueducts were built from Georgetown to Cumberland to carry water over water. The aqueducts, literally “water bridges,” carried the canal over large streams and rivers flowing into the Potomac River. This aqueduct enters directly . . . — Map (db m96115) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Mill
On Old River Road.
Sitting near the junction of the Potomac River and the Great Seneca Creek, the Seneca Mill had a long tradition at this pivotal location.

By 1725, a grist mill functioned here as a commercial staple for the small village. Early proprietors . . . — Map (db m96104) HM

Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Mills During the Civil War
Near Old River Road north of River Road, on the right when traveling north.
With only the Potomac River between Montgomery County and the Confederate South, Seneca Mills residents were always close to impending troop activity. At the beginning of the war, the Seneca Mill community was worthy of consideration by the . . . — Map (db m118667) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Schoolhouse
On River Road.
In 1865, local farmer and miller Upton Darby canvassed neighbors for subscriptions to construct a one-room schoolhouse of red sandstone from the Seneca quarries. Darby donated the land and building materials; families contributed labor as well as . . . — Map (db m96083) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Store
On Old River Road at River Road, on the right on Old River Road.
In 1900, Frederick Allnutt purchased the 1855 Darby House and 1½ acres of land from Wilson Tschiffely, who had recently acquired the property along with the nearby mill. Allnutt, who had been running a store next to the canal for several years, . . . — Map (db m765) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Store
On Old River Road.
Constructed in 1901, Frederick A. Allnutt built this gable-front, general store on Old River Road beside his newly acquired place of residence, the c. 1855 Darby House. This two-and-a-half story wood and frame store originally had counters on both . . . — Map (db m96105) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — The Historic Seneca Schoolhouse
On River Road.
The 1866 Seneca Schoolhouse—the oldest surviving one-room school building in Montgomery County—today offers a unique “living history” experienced for Washington area children.

Leaving their cell phones and computer . . . — Map (db m96084) HM

Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — The Seneca Aqueduct
On Rileys Lock Road south of River Road.
Canal engineers build aqueducts to bridge canal boats over rivers and large stream such as Seneca Creek. Eleven aqueducts were needed between here and the canal’s western terminus at Cumberland, Maryland; all required skilled quarrymen and . . . — Map (db m760) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Watering the Canal
Near Violette's Lock Road, on the right when traveling south.
Why are there two locks here? While they may look similar, the two locks played very different roles in the operation of the canal. The lock in front of you is Inlet Lock 2. The lock behind you is Lift Lock 23. Lift locks raised and lowered boats to . . . — Map (db m22039) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — ‘Most Lonesome Spot’Tools for the Trades — Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —
On Georgia Avenue (U.S. 29) at Silver Spring Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
In 1912 John H. and Thomas Hunter opened Hunter Bros., a hardware and implements business, on what John described as "the most lonesome spot between Glenmont and the city of Washington." Housed in a two-story wood frame structure, the hardware . . . — Map (db m67613) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — 24-Hour ServiceSwitching Places — Silver Spring Geogia Avenue Heritage Trail —
On Georgia Avenue (U.S. 97) at Cameron Street, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
From 1946 to 2000, Tastee Diner's 24-hour service could be enjoyed three blocks south at 8516 Georgia Avenue. Designated a Montgomery County Master Plan Historic Preservation site in 1994, this classic Streamline Moderne-style diner was . . . — Map (db m66995) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — A Community GrowsWayne Avenue Landmarks — Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) at Wayne Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Georgia Avenue.
With a burst of new development in 1927, downtown Silver Spring's commercial center -- originally located around the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad station (8100 Georgia Avenue at Sligo Avenue) -- firmly re-established itself three blocks to the north. . . . — Map (db m62161) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — A Downtown is BornLocal Institutions — Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) at Sligo Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Georgia Avenue.
The Establishment of Silver Spring's first bank and Newspaper, traditional institutions required for a community to grow and prosper, occurred on this corner with the opening of the Silver Spring National Bank in 1910 and publication of The Maryland . . . — Map (db m62165) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — A New Deal in TownSilver Spring Post Office — Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —
On Georgia Avenue (U.S. 29) at Bonifant Street, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
Silver Spring During the Civil War If you has used our post office between 1937 and 1981 you would have seen a mural depicting a possible Civil War scenario. Opened on March 1, 1937, the Georgian Revival style Silver Spring post office at . . . — Map (db m76411) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — A Pond with a PurposeStorm Water Management Ponds
Near Deer Hollow Trail, on the right when traveling north.
Water cycles endlessly through nature, evaporating and rising into the air, condensing and forming clouds, and precipitating back to earth as rain, snow, sleet, or hail. In natural areas, most rain water is caught by vegetation or soaks into . . . — Map (db m110542)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Alternative to Plastic Water BottlesGreen Thumbs Up!
Near Glenallen Avenue east of Heurich Road.
Brookside Gardens has banned the use of plastic water bottles at our own events. Instead we provide a water cooler, from which staff can fill reusable bottles or compostable cups. We've also added water bottle filling attachments to our outdoor . . . — Map (db m110527)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Ament HallNational Park Seminary
On Dewitt Drive north of Linden Lane, on the left when traveling north.
National Park Seminary was a resort hotel from 1887 to 1893, a school for young women from 1894 to 1942, and a U.S. Army medical facility from 1942 to 2004. It is now a unique residential community. The massive Ament Hall, built in 1927, . . . — Map (db m115990) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Azalea Garden1970 — Brookside Gardens: 40 years (1969-2009) —
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road, on the right when traveling east.
Hans Hanses, the M-NCPPC landscape designer responsible for designing the original gardens, was asked by several people what his design concept was for the gardens: "They were disappointed because there was no such [thing as a garden concept]. We . . . — Map (db m114203) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Bioretention
On Evans Parkway near Barrie Avenue, on the left when traveling east.
What is bioretention? Bioretention is a technique using natural methods to remove harmful pollutants in stormwater runoff through a variety of physical, biological, and chemical treatment processes. Pollutants such as particles of dirt, oils, . . . — Map (db m110604)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Bioretention Gardens
On Layhill Road (Maryland Route 182) at Middlevale Lane, on the left when traveling north on Layhill Road.
Bioretention Gardens absorb rainwater and filter pollutants using soil, stone and plants. Stormwater is rain that runs off hard surfaces and carries pollution to our streams. Montgomery County has thousands of practices like this one to . . . — Map (db m110613)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Bioretention Gardens
Near Shorefield Road east of Shorefield Court.
Bioretention Gardens absorb rainwater and filter pollutants using soil, stone and plants. Stormwater is rain that runs off hard surfaces and carries pollution to our streams. Montgomery County has thousands of practices like this one to . . . — Map (db m110636)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Blair House
Near Newell Street near Kennett Street.
In 1842, Francis Preston Blair built a country house very near this park and divided his time between his 300 acre farm and his city residence "Blair House", which is now the President's official guest house in Washington, D.C. Blair was a powerful . . . — Map (db m75736) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Blair Mansion: Silver Spring / Blair Station Post OfficeTRANSORMA/TRANSFORMA © 2005
On Newell Street at Kennett Street, on the right when traveling north on Newell Street.
[Panel 1:] Blair Mansion: Silver Spring Prior to the development of modern Silver Spring, this immediate area was a bucolic, rural landscape in a portion of Montgomery County then known as Sligo. The property was owned by Francis . . . — Map (db m23488) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Building BlocksA Penny for Your Thoughts — Silver Spring Heritage - Colesville Road —
On Colesville Road (U.S. 29) at Fentron Street, on the right when traveling south on Colesville Road.
"Shop Along the Silver Strip, Suburban Washington's Newest and Finest Shopping Community," proclaimed the January 8, 1942 Silver Spring Standard newspaper upon its opening. Businesses residing in these storefronts offered a variety of . . . — Map (db m68578) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Burnt Mills
Near Columbia Pike (U.S. 29).
The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission built the Burnt Mills water filtration facility in 1929 to meet increasing demand for clean water in the rapidly-growing Washington. D. C. suburbs. The two brick Colonial Revival buildings housed . . . — Map (db m74198) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Canada Dry Building
Designed in 1946 by New York City architect Walter Monroe Cory, the Canada Dry Bottling Plant is the most architecturally significant Streamline Moderne industrial structure in Montgomery County and a landmark in downtown Silver Spring. The extant . . . — Map (db m75058) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — CisternsProject Summary
On Glenallen Avenue east of Layhill Road, on the right when traveling east.
In 2015, Glen Waye Gardens Condominiums and Bethesda Green undertook three major methods to reduce Glen Waye's stormwater runoff: • Reforestation project: 60 native trees were planted. • Cisterns: 6 concrete pads and rainwater collection . . . — Map (db m112542) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — CompostingGreen Thumbs Up!
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road.
Brookside Gardens composts all of its green waste, reusing it to mulch garden beds and to nourish soils. In 2007, 33 million tons of yard waste entered the municipal waste stream - 13 percent of total municipal waste in the US. — Map (db m114205) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Conduit Track Switch and Crossover
Near Bonifant Road west of Carona Drive, on the right when traveling east.
D. C. Transit System 1540, shown to the right on the turning loop at 11th and Monroe Streets NW, will soon operate south on 11th Street to east on E Street to south on 9th Street to east on Pennsylvania Avenue. Just east of 7th Street, the car will . . . — Map (db m115996) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Confederate Monument
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) at Grace Church Road, on the right when traveling north on Georgia Avenue.
To the Memory of →•← Seventeen — Unknown — Confederate Dead, Who Fell in Front of Washington, D.C. July 12, 1864. — By Their — Comrades. — Map (db m76032) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Conservation LandscapingProject Summary
Near Greenery Lane east of Layhill Road, on the left when traveling east.
In 2015, Glen Waye Gardens Condominiums and Bethesda Green undertook three major methods to reduce Glen Waye's stormwater runoff: • Reforestation Project: 60 native trees were planted. • Cisterns: 6 concrete pads and rainwater . . . — Map (db m112543) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Conservatory1969 — Brookside Gardens: 40 years (1969-2009) —
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road, on the right when traveling east.
The original concept for Brookside Gardens was to create an arboretum (a site that primarily focuses on trees and other woody plant materials); however after visiting several botanical gardens in New York plus a stop at Longwood Gardens in . . . — Map (db m114208) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Creating Pollinator & Native Plant GardensThe Little Things Run the World
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road.
Every time you walk into your garden to enjoy a beautiful flower or pick a fruit, you might thank a bee, butterfly or hummingbird. These and other kinds of animals are pollinators -- they move pollen from one flower to another flower of the same . . . — Map (db m110548)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — DC Area Sniper Victims Memorial
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road, on the right when traveling east.
During the Summer and Fall in 2002 the senseless violence of two men caused the deaths of thirteen innocent people. Although the tragedies occurred in several parts of the country sniper fire in the Washington, DC area abruptly ended the lives of . . . — Map (db m110640) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Early's Raid on Washington
On Newell Street at Kennett Street, on the right when traveling north on Newell Street.
Washington, D.C. was raided in 1864 by 14,000 Confederate troops led by General Jubal Early. Skirmishes took place in Silver Spring and Washington, with the attack finally being stopped at Fort Stevens - just a few miles south of this site. . . . — Map (db m76026) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Edmonston's Mill
On Paint Branch Trail north of East Randolph Road, on the right when traveling north.
Outside the Mill In searching for the remains of a mill, an archaeologist is forced to ask the same questions a miller pondered years ago — where should the mill be built and what should this building look like. Of prime . . . — Map (db m115376) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Efficient Irrigation SystemGreen Thumbs Up!
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road, on the right when traveling east.
Prior to installation of the Gardens' in-ground irrigation system, 60 percent of gardeners' time was spent pulling up and placing water hoses during the hot, dry months. With this important technology, gardeners can now spend more time actually . . . — Map (db m110550)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Elements of Brookside's Rain Garden
Near Glenallan Avenue east of Heurich Road, on the right when traveling east.
Permeable Sidewalk: Permeable paving captures water that would normally run off and allows it to soak down into gravel beds below. Strip Drain: This drain captures water as it flows across the sidewalk and channels it into the upper . . . — Map (db m110543)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Emerald Ash BorerSigns and Symptoms
On Glenallen Avenue east of Heurich Road.
Emerald ash borer or EAB, is an invasive insect that has already killed tens of millions of native ash trees in the US and threatens millions more. Help slow the spread of EAB by checking your ash trees for these common signs and symptoms of . . . — Map (db m110529) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Emerald Ash BorerSigns and Symptoms
Near Shorefield Road east of Shorefield Court.
Emerald ash borer or EAB, is an invasive insect that has already killed tens of millions of native ash trees in the US and threatens millions more. Help slow the spread of EAB by checking your ash trees for these common signs and symptoms of . . . — Map (db m110630)
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Emerald Ash BorerSigns and Symptoms
Near Henderson Avenue east of Bernard Drive.
Emerald ash borer or EAB, is an invasive insect that has already killed tens of millions of native ash trees in the US and threatens millions more. Help slow the spread of EAB by checking your ash trees for these common signs and symptoms of . . . — Map (db m110637) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Enticing Business‘Buy-Appeal’ through ‘Eye-Appeal’ — Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —
On Georgia Avenue (U.S. 29) at Silver Spring Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
In 1945, John H. Hunter sold his hardware business to Lawrence B. Maloney, Sr. a former International Harvester Co. branch manager from Richmond, Va. Maloney was assisted in his new position by sons Lawrence (Larry), Jr. and Leonard. Renamed . . . — Map (db m67665) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Evans Parkway Neighborhood Park2015 SITES Certified — Sustainable SITES Initiative —
Near Evans Parkway east of Barrie Avenue, on the left when traveling east.
Evans Parkway Neighborhood Park is the first Maryland-National Capital Park & Planning Commission park certified by the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES). SITES was created to transform land development and management practices through the . . . — Map (db m110603) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Fawcett's Mill
Near Paint Branch Trail east of Tamarack Road, on the left when traveling east.
Whirl of the Wheel, Clickety-Clack of the Loom In 1850, there were 9,780 sheep raised in Montgomery County - more than double the amount of horses or cows in this agrarian setting. Sheep were highly valued for their outer coat of wool, a . . . — Map (db m115378) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler
On East West Highway, on the right when traveling north.
(Center Plaque): Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler October 7, 1770 - November 20, 1843The first superintendent of the United States' survey of the coast, founded in 1807, led America's efforts in establishing the geodetic framework for all land . . . — Map (db m54502) HM

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