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Washington County Maryland Historical Markers

738 markers matched your search criteria. Markers 201 through 401 are listed. Previous 200 Next 338
 
Parking Lot is Where Station Once Stood image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, August 5, 2006
Parking Lot is Where Station Once Stood
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock StationWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Cumberland Extension of the Western Maryland Railway reached Hancock by December of 1904. The Hancock Station was a combination passenger and freight station that was constructed in 1904–1905. Passenger service was discontinued in . . . — Map (db m736) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock United Methodist Church
Oldest Church in Hancock Hancock Methodist Church "1828" — Map (db m117298) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock Veterans Memorial
The American Eagle in his inspiring grandeur is the symbol of our heritage. As the eagle soars through the vast sky with endless freedom and total power we are reminded of the pride we find living in this country based on freedom, equality and . . . — Map (db m139128) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock's Orchard Industry
Hancock and its surrounding area during the main span of the 20th century was one of the largest fruit producers in the nation. In 1886 Edmund Pendleton Cohill began the cultivation of fruit crops. Over the years his planted acreage increased, and . . . — Map (db m5933) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Interstate 68 Maryland Vietnam Memorial
Interstate Route 68 is dedicated in recognition and memory of those Marylanders who served in the Vietnam War 1959 - 1975 - Dedicated August 2, 1991 - This plaque is donated to the State of Maryland by Chapter 172 Vietnam Veterans of . . . — Map (db m67091) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Joseph Hancock, Jr.
. . . — Map (db m117297) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Little PoolWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Little Pool was part of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal which connected Cumberland to Georgetown and ran parallel to the Potomac River. The principal cargo hauled on the canal heading east was coal. Westbound boats hauled various cargoes such as . . . — Map (db m96155) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Major James Breathed"Hardest artillery fighter the war produced"
Maj. James Breathed was born near present-day Berkeley Spring, W. Va., on December 15, 1838, and moved while young with his family to Washington Co., Md. He attended St. James School in Lydia, where his father John Breathed was headmaster. At age . . . — Map (db m5932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Millstone & Moffet StationWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A small community originally called Millstone Point, but later changed to just Millstone, grew up along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Andrew Jackson (General and later U.S. President) met a committee from Hancock here. Harpers Monthly relates the . . . — Map (db m96154) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — National Pike Toll HouseCirca 1822
The significance of this structure lies both in its history and architecture. It is one of the few remaining “toll houses” along the old National Road. The National Road was chartered between Hancock and Cumberland in 1819 and completed . . . — Map (db m5799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Railroad Siding & Coal TrestleWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A railroad siding was constructed near here to allow the train's coal cars to unload their cargo at the coal trestle. From the trestle the coal cars would dump the coal to load the trucks that were waiting down below. The trucks would then deliver . . . — Map (db m96156) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park
Across the canal bed are the remains of the once prosperous Round Top Cement Mill. The abundance of high calcium limestone drew cement manufacturers to this area in 1838. A useful material, limestone can be cut into building blocks or burned and . . . — Map (db m96123) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Hydraulic Cement Company operated at this site from 1863 to 1909. The mill, which was powered by a 16 foot water wheel and eight coal fired kilns, produced 2200 barrels of hydraulic cement per week. The raw materials for the mill were . . . — Map (db m96160) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top GeologyChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
The layers of red sandstone, siltstone, shale and limestone beneath the limekilns on the other side of the canal are like pages in a book to geologists. These folded, even rock layers indicate that millions of years ago this area was covered by a . . . — Map (db m96125) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Heritage AreaWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Round Top Hill is ecologically sensitive due to its unique geology and topography. These characteristics have resulted in the formation of unique natural habitats (often referred to as natural communities which support a variety of unusual plants . . . — Map (db m96161) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Sand CompanyWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Sand Company and the Maryland Glass Company mined sand in this area during the early 1900's. On the ridge overlooking this area lies a thick bed of Oriskany Sandstone. This sedimentary rock formation yielded a fine, white sand that was . . . — Map (db m96162) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill and Town Hill Mountains
Rainwater enters the outcropping sandstones of Sideling Hill and collects in what is termed an aquifer. In this highway cut, the water runs out at the bottom of the fractured sandstone layers because it cannot go through the dense claystone below. . . . — Map (db m5543) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill Cut North Bench
The sweep of geologic time exposed by this 380 foot slice into Sideling Hill spans about 20 million years. From the dark gray marine rocks at the far end of the north slope which are about 36 million years old, to the white continental sandstones at . . . — Map (db m826) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill Cut South Bench
Across the highway, you have a clue to the past. The slanting tan sandstone was the bed of a river which scoured out the curved place you see. The river meandered away and left a marshy area or lake which was filled with dark gray mud or claystone. . . . — Map (db m827) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Siding and Packing House SiteWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A siding track, two and one half miles long, ran through the town of Hancock. This track allowed local businesses to load and off load materials and supplies. Typical materials included lumber, timber, agricultural supplies, sand, coal, aggregate . . . — Map (db m96159) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — St. Thomas ChurchFounded 1835
During 1861–62 the church was used as a hospital by Union troops of 39th Illinois Regiment Volunteers, 5th Connecticut Regiment Volunteers, 46th Pennsylvania Regiment Volunteers, and 28th New York Regiment Volunteers, under Colonel Williams. . . . — Map (db m739) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — St. Thomas Episcopal ChurchUnintended Target
Before you, at the top of Church Street, stands St. Thomas Episcopal Church, which became an unintended target of Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s artillery on January 5-6, 1862. Jackson had led his force from Winchester, Virginia to . . . — Map (db m832) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Apple IndustryWestern Maryland Rail Trail
For well over one hundred years the Hancock area has been at the heart of the Maryland Apple Industry. At the first part of the 20th Century, the gently rolling hills and vast open territories hosted over twelve major orchards. Some of the more . . . — Map (db m96163) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The C&O Canal: Serving the Potomac ValleyChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal was a crucial strand in an economic web stretching from the mountain town of Cumberland to the tidewater ports of Georgetown and Alexandria. The canal depended on the prosperity of the nearby towns, businesses and . . . — Map (db m96127) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Challenge of Sideling HillThe Historic National Road - The Road That Built The Nation
“Our pleasure trips usually stopped at the top of the mountain because of the hairpin turn to the right that dropped into a severely sharp curve.” This route is an ancient one. Our traveling ancestors pushed across, . . . — Map (db m825) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Historic Bowles HouseHancock Visitor Center — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park —
Built in the 1780’s this farm house witnessed the arrival of the C&O Canal in the mid-1830’s. Located at the east side of Hancock, the house residents catered to canawlers who passed through Lock 52 and the Tonoloway Aqueduct, selling goods and . . . — Map (db m61164) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m824) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built a Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m830) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The TonolowaysWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Big Tonoloway and Little Tonoloway Creeks empty into the Potomac River nearby. The Native American translation for Tonoloway is "long tail" or "wildcat". People of English, German, and Scots-Irish descent, who came down from present day Fulton . . . — Map (db m96157) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Tonoloway Fort
Lieut. Stoddert and twenty men erected and garrisoned a block house and stockaded fort near here on the property of Evan Shelby in 1755 after Braddock’s defeat. It was abandoned in 1756-7 after Fort Frederick was completed. — Map (db m508) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Army Headquarters
Gen. George McClellan used the Pry House as the headquarters for the Union Army of the Potomac. Officers brought some of the Pry furniture out on the lawn. There eyewitnesses described a “small redan built of fence rails” with telescopes . . . — Map (db m40447) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Civil War Hospital SiteSamuel Pry Mill
Civil War Hospital Site Samuel Pry Mill Was used as a hospital during The Maryland Campaign 1862 Private Property courtesy of S.H.A.F. — Map (db m3203) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Felfoot Bridge
Built in 1854 by George Burgan for $1,550, this bridge spans Little Antietam Creek and stands on "Felfoot" a tract of land originally surveyed in 1734 and patented to Thomas Swearingen in 1737. An unusual feature of this bridge is the squared . . . — Map (db m4929) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Hess’s Mill Bridge
This two-arch bridge was built by John Weaver in 1832. It is unique in that one arch is so much larger than the other. The smaller arch may have accommodated the millrace which was located on that side of the Little Antietam and served the mill that . . . — Map (db m2003) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Hitt Bridge
This three-arch span with its unusually high center arch was built in 1830 over a ford in the Antietam Creek that was used by Braddock's army in 1755. Samuel Hitt was instrumental in financing this bridge, which was built by Silas Harry, as agent . . . — Map (db m3201) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Hitt-Cost House
The main timber-frame portion of the house was built by the Hitt family before 1790. A log addition was added in the 1830's by the Cost family, nearly doubling the size of the house. After the battle of Antietam, it was used as a hospital and later . . . — Map (db m6777) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — KeedysvilleHeadquarters and Hospital Town — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
After the Battle of South Mountain ended around nightfall on September 14, 1862, many Confederates marched by here. The next day, Gen. George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac arrived, and McClellan established his headquarters here in the German . . . — Map (db m1640) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Keedysville District World War II Memorial
Honor Roll In memory of those from the Keedysville District who served their country in World War II 1941 – 1945 * Gerald Baker       * Ernest L. Eavey, Jr. * Roger Easterday       * Gardner Lapole John Benner • Roger Burtner • Arlington . . . — Map (db m41733) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Keedysville Korea & Vietnam Memorial
This memorial dedicated in honor and memory of all our veterans who served in Korea and Vietnam. May God bless them all. — Map (db m41732) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Keedysville World War I Memorial
Erected by the citizens of the community in recognition of the patriotism shown by our boys who answered our country’s call in the World War 1917 – 1919. Killed in Action Private Reno Emory Wyand Served with Distincton . . . — Map (db m41730) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Pry Family Upheaval
A knock on the door on September 16, 1862, forever changed the lives of Philip and Elizabeth Pry. For almost twenty years, the Prys prospered on this 140-acre farm along Antietam Creek while raising their family of six children. With Confederate . . . — Map (db m40445) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Pry Mill
The 20.25 acre property on Little Antietam Creek was bequeathed to Samuel Merritt Hitt by Robert Smith on October 28, 1818. A two-story, two-section grist and sawmill was constructed about 1820 by Hitt, who diverted the established road so traffic . . . — Map (db m3202) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Pry’s Mill Bridge
This two-arch bridge was built over the Little Antietam Creek by George Burgan for $1,650 in 1858. Its cutwaters, the upstream pier bulwarks designed to divide the current and break up ice flows and log jams, are unique in that they are shaped like . . . — Map (db m2004) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’ Crossroads
This crossing served during July 10-15, 1863, as an anchor for the flanks of such gathering Federal forces as the Reserve Artillery and the Second, Third, and Twelfth Corps. Minor skirmishes with elements of Lee's besieged Army of Northern Virginia . . . — Map (db m1989) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’s CrossroadsForts Facing Forts
For the first time since the Battle of Gettysburg, most of the Union army faced Gen. Robert E. Lee on July 12, 1863. The Federals were firmly entrenched on a ridge parallel to the Sharpsburg-Hagerstown Turnpike a quarter mile west. Less than a mile . . . — Map (db m1990) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans Crossroads — Booth’s Mill Bridge
Built in 1833 by Charles Wilson for $2,700, this three-archer over Antietam Creek has spans of 45', 43' and 45'. It replaced a wooden bridge near the site of a powder mill. Also known as the Delamere Bridge, it is near the pillared mansion . . . — Map (db m1983) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans Crossroads — Council of WarShould We Attack?
Gen. George G. Meade gathered his generals near here at his “Antietam Bridge” headquarters on the evening of July 12, 1863, to decide whether to assault the Confederate defenses near Williamsport protecting Gen. Robert E. Lee’s escape . . . — Map (db m1982) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Erected in Honor of the Boys of Leitersburg District
Erected in honor of the boys of Leitersburg District who served in The World War 1917 - 1919 R. Lee Slick Andrew M. Hartman John R. Myers Leiter D. Lowery, Corp. Allan F. Miner Russell E. Hartle A. Stanley Hollinger, Corp., Levi. M. . . . — Map (db m6527) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m4732) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Leitersburg Bridge No. 2
This is the first of two bridges built in 1839 by John Weaver. The two-arch span rises steeply over the Antietam Creek and is unusual because of the lateral curve in its roadbed. It was long known as Strite's Mill Bridge because of a mill to the . . . — Map (db m6525) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Retreat into Maryland"Asleep and at the same time walking"
Gettysburg Campaign It was a miserable night, and an even more miserable journey. As 3 a.m. neared on July 5, 1863, the van of the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg arrived here at Leitersburg. The men had marched nonstop for nearly twelve . . . — Map (db m4730) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Locust Grove — Park Hall Road
Parks Hall (later called Park Hall) was the first land grant in the area that was to become Washington County. This 1550 acre tract was surveyed September 9, 1731, and patented to William Parks on November 24, 1732. It included the land on which . . . — Map (db m7310) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Mercersville — Mercersville
Mercersville was named for Charles Fenton Mercer, who served as the first president of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company from June 1828 through June 1833. Mr. Mercer, from Loudoun County, Virginia, also served as a member of the U.S. House of . . . — Map (db m95690) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m674) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m670) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — The Bill Pate Portal
One half mile to the west of this plaque, the gap in South Mountain, the Appalachian Trail footbridge, and I-70 symbolically form the Bill Pate Portal to the Appalachian region—a region where a people and their governments joined in a national . . . — Map (db m668) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — The Dwight D. Eisenhower Highway"Father of the Interstate Highway System"
In August 1973, the U.S. Congress designated a cross-country stretch of Interstate as the “Dwight D. Eisenhower Highway,” in tribute to President Eisenhower’s early recognition of the need for a national network of highways to enhance . . . — Map (db m669) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m671) HM
Maryland (Washington County), near Sharpsburg — Ferry HillFarm, Ferry and Freedom
The brick home in front of you (Picture included) once stood at the heart of a Western Maryland plantation called "Ferry Hill." Built between 1812 and 1820, the plantation consisted of nearly 700 acres of land, a tavern, and a ferry. An enslaved . . . — Map (db m58252) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — 100 - Pounder Battery - Heaviest and Highest
During an inspection in late April 1863, Brig. Gen. John G. Barnard recommended that a gun be placed at a high point on this crest, "surrounded by a wall of sandbags, and arranged to fire not only on Loudoun Heights [across the Potomac] but into . . . — Map (db m3854) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — 30-Pounder Battery
Positioned here at the end of a towering plateau, this fortification was the first earthen battery built on the mountain by the Federals in the fall of 1862. Facing south, its guns "commanded perfectly the summits of Loudoun Heights as well as . . . — Map (db m5032) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Charcoal Making on Maryland Heights
The charcoal industry required wood; Maryland Heights offered plenty. From 1810 to 1848 the Antietam Iron Works, 7 miles to the north, cut trees on the mountain to make charcoal to fuel its furnace and forges. The burning charcoal helped produce . . . — Map (db m5004) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Civil War Campgrounds
For more than three years - May 1862 through July 1865 - Union soldiers lived, worked, and played on Maryland Heights. They built numerous campgrounds on this inhospitable mountain that lacked water, level ground, or adequate sanitation conditions. . . . — Map (db m5007) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Exploring Maryland Heights
As the highest ridge surrounding the town of Harpers Ferry, Maryland Heights once bustled with private industry and Civil War occupation. Antietam Iron Works, a major nail producer in the early 1800s, burned the timber of the heights for charcoal . . . — Map (db m116570) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Exterior Fort
Built in 1863 to strengthen a double row of rifle-pits and to protect against attack from the north, the Exterior Fort consisted of two parallel rock walls, or breastworks, about 530 feet apart. The south line, visible in front of you, extended 520 . . . — Map (db m5009) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Harpers Ferry - Changes through Time
Situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, Harpers Ferry was named for Robert Harper, a millwright who continued a ferry operation here in 1747. The waterpower of the two rivers - harnessed for industry - generated tremendous . . . — Map (db m5033) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Hiking Maryland Heights
Here the trail divides and the choice is yours. Time and hiking difficulties are important factors as you select your trail route. The Stone Fort Trail To your left, is a strenuous but rewarding hike to the summit. The route passes Civil War . . . — Map (db m116568) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Interior Fort
You are standing inside the Interior Fort, facing its north wall - the most imposing earthwork on Maryland Heights. This nine-foot-high parapet and accompanying ditch defended the crest from attack from the north. The five embrasures which cut . . . — Map (db m5028) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Lift Lock 33
Here, the forces of nature created a natural corridor for commerce. The Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers carved a notch in the mountains, providing passage west. Communities grew up on both sides of the river and later a turnpike, railroad, and canal . . . — Map (db m4978) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Making a Mountain Citadel
Tired and breathless? You are experiencing the hardship of a Union soldier climbing to reach his work place (a fort) or his home (a tent or log cabin). Try ascending this road hauling a 9,700-pound gun tube or a week's supply of water. From 1862 . . . — Map (db m4992) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Maryland Heights - Mountain Fortress of Harpers Ferry
You are standing on the border between North and South during the Civil War. As the highest ridge surrounding Harpers Ferry, Maryland Heights played a prominent role in the strategic operations of both the Union and Confederacy. Southern forces . . . — Map (db m4982) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Naval Battery
Positioned 300 feet above the Potomac River the Naval Battery was the first Union fortification on Maryland Heights. Hastily built in May 1862, its naval guns were rushed here from the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard. Along with a detachment of 300 . . . — Map (db m4985) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sandy Hook — Stone Fort
To command Maryland Heights' highest point, the Federals built this massive foundation, called the Stone Fort in the winter of 1862-63. Union engineers designed this defense as an infantry blockhouse to ward off Confederate attack along the crest. . . . — Map (db m5010) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "A House Was Burning"
Union soldiers described the fighting at the Mumma farm: "I do not see how any of us got out alive. The shot and shell fell about us thick and fast, I can tell you, but I did not think much about getting shot after the first volley." "Just in . . . — Map (db m6184) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Back Boys, For God's Sake Move Back;""You Are In A Bad Fix"
Gen. Edwin Vose Sumner, Union Second Corps Commander (1) As the battle shifted away from the Cornfield, Gen. John Sedwick's division of Federal troops, personally led by corps commander Gen. Edwin Sumner, advanced from the East Woods. . . . — Map (db m20659) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Destroy the Rebel Army"
Before the Battle of Antietam, President Abraham Lincoln sent a telegram to General George B. McClellan, commanding the Union Army of the Potomac: GOD BLESS YOU AND ALL WITH YOU DESTROY THE REBEL ARMY IF POSSIBLE McClellan, with an . . . — Map (db m6293) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Every Stalk of Corn"
Americans fought back and forth across the Cornfield for three hours. Those three hours may encompass the most concentrated fury in American history. The Union First Corps and Twelfth Corps were fought out. On the Confederate side, Jackson's corps . . . — Map (db m5813) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "God has indeed remembered us"
At a farmhouse and barn not far from here, Clara Barton labored without sleep for three days, comforting the wounded of the Battle of Antietam with water, food, and medical supplies. Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, began her . . . — Map (db m5902) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "It Is A.P. Hill"
Outnumbered Southerners watched the Northern Ninth Corps climb the hills toward them: "The first thing we saw appear was the gilt eagle that surmounted the pole, then the top of the flag, next the flutter of the stars and stripes itself, . . . — Map (db m89210) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Point Blank Range"
Five hundred Georgia and a few South Carolina riflemen kept the entire Union Ninth Corps on the far side of Antietam Creek for three hours. A Union general described what Northern soldiers were up against: "From the crest to bridge the slope was . . . — Map (db m6802) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "The Battle Opened"
Dawn was at 5:43 a.m. By 6 a.m. Southern defenders could see the Union's First Corps: "In apparent double battle lines, the Federals were moving toward us at charge bayonets, common time, and the sunbeams falling on their well polished guns and . . . — Map (db m5903) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "The End of the Confederacy Was In Sight"
Major General Edwin Sumner commanded the Second Corps, largest corps in the Union Army of the Potomac - but he never could get his three divisions together. His lead division was broken in the West Woods. Brigadier General William French's division . . . — Map (db m5496) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "The Jaws of Death"
Sedgwick's division entered the West Woods. "The last of the charging lines had gone beyond, and was sweeping majestically into the jaws of death when the mass seemed to halt, while from the front line spouted forth a long angry sheet of flame . . . — Map (db m6267) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "These Men Are Going to Stay Here"
Before the fighting started here, General Robert E. Lee rode up to encourage his men. Colonel John B. Gordon responded loud enough for all to hear: "These men are going to stay here, General, till the sun goes down or victory is won!" Years . . . — Map (db m5495) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "We May Never Meet Again"
A few days before the battle, bidding farewell to a friend, Union General Mansfield said: "We may never meet again." Brigadier General William E. Starke, C.S.A. He led the counterattack that helped stop the first Union attack down the . . . — Map (db m6973) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Why Burnside's Bridge?"
Ever since the battle the Lower Bridge has been Burnside Bridge. Confederate Colonel Douglas was a native of Sharpsburg, and familiar with Antietam Creek. After the war he wrote: "Go look at it and tell me if you don't think Burnside and his . . . — Map (db m6449) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Will You Give Us Our Whiskey?"
Union Major General Ambrose Burnside's Ninth Corps was ready at 7 a.m. The order to attack came at 9 a.m. 1. One division spent the morning looking for the ford downstream. 2. At the bridge the 11th Connecticut Regiment made the first attack. They . . . — Map (db m6459) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "With Flags Flying"
The Cornfield was quiet. The first two Union attacks had failed to break the Confederate line. Union Major General John Sedgwick's division formed up in column of brigades: three brigades - each with more than 1,700 men - each brigade a double rank . . . — Map (db m6268) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "You Are Firing Into Our Own Men"
Union Major General Joseph Mansfield led his Twelfth Corps into the East Woods. He had commanded the corps only two days. Mansfield saw soldiers from the 10th Maine Regiment firing into the woods: "Stop, you are firing into our own men!" . . . — Map (db m5812) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “A Thrilling Spectacle”
Second Corps, with 15,000 soldiers was the largest corps in the Union Army of the Potomac. Its lead division went into the West Woods alone. The other two divisions strayed to the south and passed in front of this point, marching from left to right. . . . — Map (db m6212) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “Forever Free”
The battle was over, but the two armies still faced one another. The Union army was still twice as strong. General Robert E. Lee, CSA "If McClellan wants to fight in the morning, I will give him battle again." Lee stayed at Antietam one more . . . — Map (db m6519) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “I Hate Cannons”
Confederate Colonel Stephen D. Lee positioned his batteries to repel Union attacks toward the Dunker Church. The attacks came and the guns fired solid shot and explosive shells and canister - tin cans filled with small lead or iron balls that . . . — Map (db m6368) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “It Is A.P. Hill”
Outnumbered Southerners watched the Northern Ninth Corps climb the hills toward them: "The first thing we saw was the gilt eagle that surmounted the pole, then the top of the flag, next the flutter of the stars and stripes itself, slowly . . . — Map (db m6520) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “Load” “Commence Firing”
Civil War canoneers of both armies learned from the Artillery Drill manual: "To the Field Artillery belongs the service of the batteries which manoeuver with the troops on the field of battle. It is divided into two parts. Horse Artillery, which . . . — Map (db m6350) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 100th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
2nd Brigade 1st Division 9th Corps Location 495 yards north 79 degrees west —————— Casualties at Antietam Wounded 7 Missing 1 Total 8 Recruited in Lawrence Washington Butler Beaver Mercer and Westmoreland . . . — Map (db m6513) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 104th New York Infantry
(Wadsworth Guards) ————— 1st Brigade (Duryee's) 2nd Division (Rickett's) First Corps (Hooker's) Fought in the 'Cornfield,' near this spot, September 17, 1862 in the memorable morning engagement between Hooker and . . . — Map (db m5691) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 10-Pounder Parrott Rifle
This cast iron rifle with its band of wrought iron reinforcing the breech was a modern weapon of the day. It was effective at moderately long range. The 20-pounder, similar except for size, was the heaviest rifled cannon used at Antietam. — Map (db m67864) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry
(Around the edge of the Monument): 11th Conn. V.I. 2nd Brigade 3rd Division 9th Corps (Rear of Monument): Col. W. Kingsbury Capt. J.D. Griswold, Co. A Christian Steinmetz, Co. C William Halbeass, Co. C 1st Sergt. J.R. . . . — Map (db m6416) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 11th Mississippi Infantry RegimentLaw's Brigade — Hood's Division —
(Front):11th Mississippi Infantry Regiment Law's Brigade Hood's Division C.S.A. Dedicated 2012 on the Sesquicentennial of the Battle Duty brought them to the field Honor led them into battle Valor covered them with glory Ducit amore . . . — Map (db m59120) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 11th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
(Front Inscription): OHIO 11th Infantry Commanded by Lieut. Col. Augustus H. Coleman (Killed) Maj. Lyman Jackson Crook's (2nd) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Inscription): This Regiment . . . — Map (db m6785) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 124th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
Colonel Joseph W. Hawley (Right Plaque): Sept. 17, 1862 Antietam Chancellorsville May 1-2-3, 1863 (Lower Right Inscription): Recruited in Chester and Delaware Counties August 1862 for Nine Months Service (Rear . . . — Map (db m6134) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 125th Penna
While forming the extreme left front as Sedgewick's Division was being shot down in the West Woods, the 125th Penna. Inf. Rgt. was at times only 50 yards from Confederate Infantry. Of the Regiment's 54 killed and 91 wounded, most were lost here in . . . — Map (db m6903) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 125th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Below Statue): Color Sergeant George A. Simpson Killed at Antietam (Front Plaque): 125th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 1st Brigade 1st Division 12th Corps ———— Recruited in Blair Huntingdon and Cambria . . . — Map (db m6897) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 128th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
1st Brigade 1st Division 12th Corps Location 315 feet north ———— Casualties at Antietam Killed 26 Wounded 86 Missing 6 Total 118 Recruited in Berks Lehigh and Bucks Counties ———— Battles participated . . . — Map (db m5692) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — I — 12th Corps Movement
U.S.A. Through the fields west of this road the Twelfth Army Corps moved to the front between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. on September 17, 1862, Williams' Division in advance, Greene's Division following. — Map (db m7190) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 12th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
(Front Inscription):OHIO 12th Infantry Commanded by Col. Carr B. White Hugh Ewings (1st) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Inscription): This Regiment advanced to this place on the afternoon of . . . — Map (db m7116) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry
113th of the Line 4th Brigade Cavalry Division Recruited in Philadelphia Battles Participated in Second Manassas - Fisher's Hill - Clarksburg Sugar Loaf Mountain - Monocacy - Charlestown South Mountain - Frederick - Maryland Heights Antietam - . . . — Map (db m5969) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 130th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Front): 130 Pennsylvania Vounteer Infantry 2 Brigade 3 Division 2 Corps (Rear): This memorial marks the regiment's right of line in battle. Its left extended to Roulette's Lane below. It went into battle by way of the Roulette Farm . . . — Map (db m6916) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 132nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Front): Antietam 132nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 1 Brigade 3 Division 2 Corps September 17, 1862 (Back): Casualties at Antietam Killed 30 Wounded 114 Missing 3 Total 152 Battles Participated in . . . — Map (db m5499) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 137th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
1st Brigade 2nd Division 6th Corps Location of regiment in action 415 yards north of monument ———— Battles participated in South Mountain (Crampton's Pass) MD. Antietam MD. Fitzhugh's Crossing VA. Chancellorsville VA. . . . — Map (db m5693) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 13th New Jersey Infantry
September 17, 1862 ————————— First position under artillery fire, about 150 yards north of this point at 10 a.m. advanced to the Hagerstown Road and became closely engaged. — Map (db m5789) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 13th New Jersey Infantry
September 17, 1862 —————— Center of regiment at 10.20 a.m. facing west. Part of the right wing was across the road. — Map (db m6060) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 13th New Jersey Infantry
September 17, 1862 ————————— Engaged in this position, facing west, from 11.20 a.m. to about 12 noon. — Map (db m6061) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
(Front): 15th Reg. Mass. Vols. Here, September 17, 1862, the Fifteenth Reg. Mass. Volunteers, with the First Company Andrew Sharpshooters attached, 606 men of all ranks, commanded by Lieut. Col. John W. Kimball, Gorman's Brigade. . . . — Map (db m7215) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 16th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry
(Front) Position of the 16th. Conn. Vol. Infantry 5 P.M. - Sept. 17, 1862 (Left) Number engaged - 779 Casualties Killed 43 Wounded 161 Total 204 (Rear) 16th Connecticut Vol. Infantry 2nd Brigade 3rd Division 9th Army Corps . . . — Map (db m7113) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1967) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m1970) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m67693) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1st Battery Ohio Light Artillery
(Front Face): OHIO 1st Battery Light Artillery Commanded by Capt. James R. McMullin Hugh Ewings (1st) Brig. Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Face): This battery occupied position about 250 yards due . . . — Map (db m6799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — D — 1st Corps, 3rd Division, 2nd Brigade Bivouac
U.S.A. On the night of September 16, 1862, three regiments of Magilton's Brigade, Meade's Division bivouacked in the North Woods, a few feet south of this point in support Seymour's skirmishers; one regiment was in second line, in the open . . . — Map (db m5905) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1st Delaware Volunteers
Delaware 1st Delaware Volunteers Colonel John W. Andrews 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, II Corps On the morning of Sept. 17, 1862 this regiment crossed Antietam Creek forming right of first line of French's Division. Advanced with heavy . . . — Map (db m5485) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1st Maryland Artillery (CSA)
. . . — Map (db m6875) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 20th New York Volunteer Infantry
(Front): 20th Regiment. N.Y. Vols. Turner Rifles. 3d Brig. 2d Div. 6th Corps. ——— 1861-1863. (Right): Zum Andenken an unsere Gefallen Kameraden errichtet von den Ueberlebenden des Regts (Left): . . . — Map (db m59837) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 21st Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
(Front Face): 21st Mass. Vol. Inf'y 2nd Brig. 2nd Div. 9th A.C. Erected by 21st Regt. Mass. Vol. Association (Rear Face):The following Comrades were killed near this bridge: 2nd Lieut. Henry C. Holbrook Co. "D" Priv. Wm. B. . . . — Map (db m6453) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 23rd Ohio Infantry
(Front Inscription): OHIO 23d Infantry Commanded by Major James M. Comly Hugh Ewing's (1st) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Inscription): This Regiment with its Brigade . . . — Map (db m6669) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 27th Indiana Infantry
3d Brigade, 1st Division, 12th Army Corps Colonel Silas Colgrove Commanding, was engaged with the enemy 400 yards north of this marker, September 17th 1862. Number engaged 440. Killed and Wounded 209. — Map (db m5697) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 28th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
(Front of Monument): OHIO 28th Infantry Commanded by Lieut. Col. Gottfried Becker Crooks (2d) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear of Monument): This Regiment was conducted by Gen. Crook on a . . . — Map (db m6572) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 2nd Delaware
Delaware 2nd Delaware Volunteers Capt. David L. Stricker 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, II Corps This regiment of Richardson's reserve brigade crossed Antietam Creek, advanced with division and came under heavy artillery fire while holding position . . . — Map (db m5542) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 2nd Maryland Infantry
Maryland 2nd Md Infantry At 9:30 a.m. advanced on the stone bridge, defended by Toombs' Brigade and two batt- eries on high ground beyond. Charged to within 100 yards of the bridge when, checked by the severity of the enemy's fire it took . . . — Map (db m6463) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 30th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
(Front Inscription): Ohio 30th Infantry Commanded by Lieut. Col. Theodore Jones (captured) Major George H. Hildt Hugh Ewing's (1st) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Inscription): This . . . — Map (db m6685) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 34th New York Infantry
(Front Side): Thirty-Fourth Regiment N.Y.S.V Col. James A. Suiter Commanding Enlisted under President Lincoln's call, issued April 15, 1861, for 75,000 men, to serve two years. Mustered into the State service May 1, 1861 Mustered into . . . — Map (db m6902) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 35th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
The Thirty-fifth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers Crossed this bridge with Ferrero's Brigade, Ninth Army Corps at noon, Sept. 17, 1862, and moved to the right up the hill where, at the lane, two hundred and fourteen of their . . . — Map (db m6455) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
(Front of Monument): 36th Infantry commanded by Lieut. Col. Melvin Clarke (Killed) Crook's (2d) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac Ohio (Rear of Monument): This Regiment advanced near the Bridge over . . . — Map (db m6518) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 3-Inch Ordnance Rifle
This was one of the most accurate weapons used here. It was preferred over the heavier 10-pounder Parrott which fired the same size ammunition. — Map (db m67862) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 3rd Delaware Infantry
Delaware 3rd Delaware Volunteers Major Arthur MaGinnis 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, XII Corps This regiment, worn down from active service in the second Manassas Campaign, went into action Sept. 17, 1862 with only five officers and 120 men. It . . . — Map (db m7219) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 3rd Maryland Volunteer Infantry
Maryland 3rd Md. Infantry. 2nd Stainbrook's Brigade. 2nd Greene's Division. 12th Mansfield's Corps. Advanced to the corner of the Dunkard Church, in front of this Marker. Loss, 4 killed, 25 wounded. The monument to the Maryland troops is near . . . — Map (db m6857) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 3rd Regt. PennsylvaniaReserve Corps
32nd Reg. Penna. Vol. Inf. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Corps. Arriving on the field on the afternoon of September 16th, Lieut. Col. John Clark, com'd'g. the regiment immediately deployed eight companies as skirmishers. When the 2nd Brigade . . . — Map (db m5912) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 45th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
2nd Brigade 1st Division 9th Corps The regiment advanced 264 yards northwest of this point returning to this position later in the day ————— Casualties at Antietam Killed 1 Wounded 36 Missing 1 Total 38 . . . — Map (db m11424) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 48th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Front Inscription): 48th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 1st Brigade 2nd Division 9th Corps Location 385 yards south 70 degrees east ————— Casualties at Antietam Killed 8 Wounded 51 Missing 1 Total 60 . . . — Map (db m6665) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 87 — 4th and 12th U.S. Infantry
U.S.A. At 10 A.M., September 16, 1862, four companies of the Fourth United States Infantry crossed the stone bridge over the Antietam at this point and took position behind the rock ledge and barn on the left of the road and under the bank on . . . — Map (db m6792) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 4th New York Volunteer Infantry — 1st Scott Life Guard —
(Top Plaque): 4th New York Vols. First Scott Life Guard 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division 2nd Corps (Lower Plaque): Mustered in service May 4, 1861. Participated with the Army of the Potomac in the Battles of South Mountain, Antietam, . . . — Map (db m7282) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 4th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps
(Rear Inscription):4th Regt. Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps. 33rd Regt. in line, 2nd Brigade. 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps. Organized June 10th, 1861. Mustered out June 17th, 1864. ————— The regt. . . . — Map (db m5904) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 50th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
1st Brigade 1st Division 9th Corps Colonel Benjamin C. Christ ————— Casualties at Antietam Killed 8 Wounded 46 Missing 3 Total 57 Recruited in Berks Schuylkill Bradford Susquehanna Lancaster and Luzerne Counties . . . — Map (db m6495) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 2nd Brigade 2nd Division 9th Corps Location 385 yards South 70 Degrees East ——— Casualties at Antietam Killed 21 Wounded 99 Total 120 Recruited in Montgomery Northampton . . . — Map (db m6661) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Front Inscription): The 51st Regt. P. V. was organized Sept. 1861 By Col. afterwards, Maj. Gen. John F. Hartranft its leader in many battles and in this charge Mustered out July 1865 Engaged in 20 battles or minor combats and . . . — Map (db m58219) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 59th New York Infantry
3d Brig. - 2d Div. - 2d Corps ———— John Lemuel Stetson of Plattsburgh, N.Y. Lieutenant Colonel ———— "Men Rally on Your Colors" Out of 300 men and 21 officers who went into battle nearby, there fell . . . — Map (db m6274) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Q — 5th Corps, 2nd Division Position
U.S.A. On the afternoon of September 15, 1862, the two regular brigades of Sykes' Division, Fifth Army Corps went into position a few feet west of this road and parallel to it, where they remained until the morning of the 19th. This tablet . . . — Map (db m117545) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 5th Maryland Infantry
Maryland 5th Md Infantry 3rd Max Weber's Brigade. 3rd French's Division. 2nd Sumner's Corps. Advanced to the knoll above the Bloody Lane. 300 feet in the rear of of this marker. Loss. 43 killed 123 wounded. The monument to the Maryland troops . . . — Map (db m5487) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 5th Md. Vet. Vol. Infy.
Erected by the survivors of Company A & I to the memory of our fallen comrads who fell on this spot September 17, 1862. ———— This stone marks the extreme advance of Weber's Brigade French's Div. 2nd Army Corps . . . — Map (db m17622) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 5th, 7th and 66th Ohio Infantry Monument
(Front Side): Ohio 5th Infantry Commanded by Major John Collins 7th Infantry Commanded by Lieut. Col. Eugene Powell 66th Infantry Commanded by Major Orrin J. Crane Tyndale's (1st) Brigade Greene's (2d) Division . . . — Map (db m6348) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 7th Regiment PennsylvaniaReserve Volunteer Infantry
36th Regiment in line, 2nd Brigade. 3rd Division, 1st Corps. Organized June 26, 1861. Mustered out June 16, 1864. The regiment arrived on the field on the afternoon of September 16, 1862. Formed at this point on the morning of the 17th. Advanced . . . — Map (db m5900) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Volunteer Infantry
At the Battle of Antietam On this spot, known as "The Cornfield," the 84th N.Y. Volunteer Infantry (14th Brooklyn, N.Y.S.M.) of the 1st Brigade, Col. Phelps, 1st Division Gen. Doubleday, 1st Corps, Gen. Hooker, was hotly engaged on the . . . — Map (db m5654) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 8th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry
. . . — Map (db m6779) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 8th Ohio Regiment
(Front): Ohio 8th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry Lieut. Col. Franklin Sawyer 1st Brigade Gen. Nathan Kimball 3rd Division Gen. W. H. French 2nd Corps, Gen. Edwin V. Sumner Army of the Potomac On this field Ohio's sons sacrificed life . . . — Map (db m5493) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 8th Regt. Pennsylvania Reserver Volunteer Corps
(At the base of the front): 37th Regiment of the Line (Inscription on the Back): 8th Pa. Reserve Vol. Inf. Major Silas M. Baily. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Div., 1st Corps. Advanced about 800 yards south and became engaged with . . . — Map (db m5919) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 90th Pennsylvania
Here fought the 90th Penna. (Phila.) Sept. 17, 1862 A hot place — Map (db m5671) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 9th New York InfantryHawkins' Zouaves
(West Face): "Toujours Pret" Erected by the State of New York to the memory of the Ninth New York Infantry - Hawkins Zouaves - who fought on this Field, Sept. 17, 1862. (North Face): Members present for duty in action 373, . . . — Map (db m6778) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A Converging Storm of Iron
Confederate Col. Stephen D. Lee placed his battalion of nineteen cannons here. Throughout the morning, Union infantry and artillery aimed their attacks towards this high ground and the Dunker Church. Twenty-five percent of his men were killed or . . . — Map (db m20575) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A Cornfield Unlike Any Other
"Through a shower of bullets and shells, it was only the thoughts of home that brought me from that place." Pvt. James Dougherty, 128th Pennsylvania Infantry, wounded in the Cornfield (1) At daybreak, Gen. Joseph Hooker's First Corps, . . . — Map (db m20624) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A Crucial Crossing, a General’s Namesake, a Battlefield Icon
Known at the time of the battle as the Rohrbach or Lower Bridge, this picturesque crossing over Antietam Creek was built in 1836 to connect Sharpsburg with Rohrersville, the next town to the south. It was actively used for traffic until 1966 when . . . — Map (db m37716) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A House Was Burning
This cemetery and the farm buildings to your right were part of Samuel and Elizabeth Mumma's farm in 1862. Warned of the coming battle, the Mummas and their ten children fled to safety. Fearful that Union sharpshooters would use the farm . . . — Map (db m20715) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A Savage Continual Thunder
At Antietam, the open and rolling terrain benefited the artillerymen of both armies. By placing their cannon on high ground, Blue and Gray alike were able to effectively strike enemy troop positions at great distances. Over 500 cannon thundered . . . — Map (db m20591) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A Simple Farm Lane Changed Forever
During the early hours of the battle, Col. John Brown Gordon promised Robert E. Lee, "These men are going to stay here, General, till the sun goes down or victory is won." The Confederate troops that Gordon commanded were part of a well protected . . . — Map (db m20742) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A View into the Past
This Civil War era photograph offers a glimpse into the two Shepherdstown communities that grew up along the river. The stone pilings in this photograph were all that remained of the covered bridge burned by Confederate troops led by Stonewall . . . — Map (db m60705) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — A.N.V.
Near this spot an abandoned Confederate gun manned by a Second Lieutenant of the 6th Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, and two infantry volunteers from Anderson's Georgia Brigade, was placed in action September 17, 1862. — Map (db m5470) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Aftermath Along the Hagerstown Turnpike
Throughout the morning of the battle, fighting raged here along the Hagerstown Turnpike. At one point, Union and Confederate forces found themselves just yards away from each other on opposite sides of this road. Afterward, commander of the Sixth . . . — Map (db m41711) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 386 — Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Command
C.S.A. Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Command Maj. Gen. R.H. Anderson Commanding. (September 17, 1862) Anderson's Division comprising the brigades of Cumming, Wright, Pryor, Mahone, Featherstone, and Armistead crossed the Potomac at . . . — Map (db m5501) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Antietam Iron Works Bridge
This four-arch stone bridge spanning the Antietam Creek was built in 1832 by John Weaver. It is located at the site of a large ironworks complex, first known as the Frederick Forge and later as the Antietam Iron Works which operated intermittently . . . — Map (db m3206) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Antietam StationRailroad to Reunion — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
After the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, soldiers’ families traveled by rail to Hagerstown or Frederick, and then by horse and buggy to the site to recover the bodies of loved ones or to search for survivors. Thus began a constant stream . . . — Map (db m1968) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 370 — Archer's Brigade
C.S.A. Archer's Brigade In its advance from the Antietam Furnace Road, west of this point, on the afternoon of September 17th, 1862. Archer's Brigade of A.P. Hill's Division encountered the Federal troops posted behind the stone wall forming the . . . — Map (db m6689) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 301 — Army of Northern VirginiaGeneral Robert E. Lee, Commanding — September 14-16, 1862 —
Army of Northern Virginia was composed of Longstreet's and Jackson's Commands, Stuart's Cavalry Division and the Reserve Artillery. D.R. Jones' and Hood's Division and Evans' Brigade of Longstreet's Command, also D.H. Hill's Division of Jackson's . . . — Map (db m5587) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 302 — Army of Northern VirginiaGeneral Robert E. Lee, Commanding — September 17, 1862 —
At about 6 a.m. Jackson became heavily engaged in resisting an attempt of Hooker's Corps of the Army of the Potomac to turn the left flank of the Confederate Army. About 7 a.m. the attempt was renewed by Mansfield's Corps. About 9 a.m. a third . . . — Map (db m5596) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 351 — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia General Robert E. Lee, Commanding September 17, 1862. General Longstreet's Command, including D.H. Hill's Division of Jackson's Command, temporarily attached, occupied the right and center of the Confederate . . . — Map (db m5620) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 118 — Army of the PotomacMajor Gen. George B. McClellan, Commanding — September 15, 1862 —
On the morning of September 15, 1862, the Army of the Potomac pursued the retreating Confederates from South Mountain: Pleasonton's cavalry, the Second, First, and Twelfth Corps by Turner's Pass, Boonsboro and Keedysville; Sykes' Division of the . . . — Map (db m5562) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 372 — Artillery Battalion, A.P. Hill's Division
C.S.A. Artillery Battalion, A.P. Hill's Division, Major R.L. Walker, Commanding, (September 17, 1862.) Four batteries of this battalion were engaged. McIntosh's (South Carolina) Battery came on the field about 2:30 p.m. and went into position . . . — Map (db m6761) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — As the Georgians Saw It
Down the narrow valley directly across the creek swept Burnside's doomed attack columns. For the entire distance to the bridge, they were exposed to deadly short-range fire from the riflemen on this ridge. The final successful thrust at 1 o'clock . . . — Map (db m6825) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Baltimore Battery
Maryland Baltimore Battery Jackson's Division C.S.A. The battery, under the command of Capt. J.B. Brockenbrough, occupied a position near this marker at daybreak, and opened the battle on the Confederate side. The monument to the Maryland troops . . . — Map (db m6270) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 101 — Batteries A and C 4th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Batteries A and C 4th U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Evan Thomas, U.S.A., Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Batteries A and C (consolidated), 4th U.S. Artillery (6 guns), relieved Battery I, 1st U.S. Artillery just north of this point and went . . . — Map (db m6032) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 94 — Batteries B and L, 2d U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Batteries B and L, 2d U.S. Artillery. Captain Jas. M. Robertson, U.S.A., Commanding (September 17, 1862.) Horse Batteries B and L (Consolidated), 2nd U.S. Artillery, crossed the Antietam by the Middle Bridge, in the forenoon of September . . . — Map (db m7055) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 95 — Batteries C and G, 3d U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Batteries C and G, 3d U.S. Artillery. Captain Horatio G. Gibson, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Horse Batteries C and G (Consolidated), 3d U.S. Artillery, crossed the Antietam in the forenoon of September 17, and went into . . . — Map (db m7027) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battery A1st MD Light Artillery
Maryland Battery A 1st MD Light Artillery 1st Slocum's Division 6th Franklin's Corps The battery under the command of Capt. John W. Wolcott occupied a line 100 feet in rear of this marker and facing Dunkard Church. Loss 1 killed, 11 wounded. The . . . — Map (db m6035) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 92 — Battery A, 2d U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery A, 2d U.S. Artillery. Captain John C. Tidball, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Horse Battery A, 2d U.S. Artillery, moved from its bivouac near Keedysville on the morning of the 17th, crossed the Antietam by the Middle . . . — Map (db m7025) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 112 — Battery A, 5th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery A, 5th U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Chas. P. Muhlenburg, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) On the morning of the 17th, Battery A was in position on the crest of the hill east of the Rohrbach Lane, east of and overlooking the . . . — Map (db m6758) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battery B1st Md Light Artillery
Maryland Battery B. 1st Md. Light Artillery 2nd (Smiths) Division 6th (Franklins) Corps The battery under the command of Lieut. Theodore J. Vanneman. Occupied a position on the edge of the East Woods, 240 yards north from this marker the . . . — Map (db m5720) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 103 — Battery B, 4th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery B, 4th U.S. Artillery Capt. Joseph B. Campbell, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Early in the morning this battery advanced from its bivouac north of Jos. Poffenberger's, passing through the North Woods to the ploughed . . . — Map (db m6105) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battery B, 4th United States ArtilleryCapt. Joseph B. Campbell
Battery B rumbled down the Hagerstown Turnpike with the initial advance of the First Corps. The Battery fought against Stonewall Jackson’s Confederates who at one point moved to within yards of the guns. The fighting became so desperate that Union . . . — Map (db m67711) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 105 — Battery C, 5th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery C, 5th U.S. Artillery Captain Dunbar R. Ransom, U.S.A. Commanding, (September 16-17, 1862.) On the evening of September 16th, Battery C, 5th U.S. Artillery came into battery 370 yards east of the Hagerstown Pike, on the south edge . . . — Map (db m6087) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 104 — Battery D, 2d U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery D, 2nd U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Edward B. Williston, U.S.A., Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Battery D, 2nd U.S. Artillery, moved from its bivouac near Crampton's Pass on the morning of the 17th and went into position south of the . . . — Map (db m6034) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 96 — Battery E, 1st U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery E, 1st U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Alanson M. Randol, U.S.A., Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Early in the afternoon of the 17th, Battery E, 1st U.S. Artillery, crossed the Antietam by the Middle Bridge and relieved Robertson's . . . — Map (db m7026) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 106 — Battery E, 2nd U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery E, 2nd U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Samuel E. Benjamin, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 16-17, 1862.) On the morning of September 16, Benjamin's Battery took position on the ridge bordering the Antietam, above the Burnside Bridge, engaged . . . — Map (db m6722) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 107 — Battery E, 4th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery E, 4th U.S. Artillery. Capt. Joseph C. Clark Jr., U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) At daybreak Battery E, 4th U.S. Artillery, was in bivouac in rear of the high ground east of the Burnside Bridge. Soon after daybreak it . . . — Map (db m6718) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 103/108 — Battery F, 5th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery F, 5th U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Leonard Martin, U.S.A., Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Early in the morning of the 17th, Battery F, 5th U.S. Artillery, generally known as Ayers' Battery, moved with Smith's Division, Sixth Army . . . — Map (db m6030) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 111 — Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery Lieut. Marcus P. Miller, U.S.A. Commanding (September 17, 1862.) Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery, belonged to the Artillery Reserve, which was attached to the Fifth Army Corps. On the morning of the 17th, the . . . — Map (db m6757) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 109 — Battery I, 1st U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery I, 1st U.S. Artillery, Lieut. Geo. A. Woodruff, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Between 9 and 10 a.m., Battery I, 1st Artillery, advancing by the Smoketown Road, passed through the East Woods to the assistance of the . . . — Map (db m6031) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 97 — Battery K, 5th U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery K, 5th U.S. Artillery, Lieut. William E. Van Reed, U.S.A., Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Battery K, 5th U.S. Artillery, crossed the Antietam, by the Middle Bridge and about 2 p.m., September 17, relieved Battery M, 2d U.S. . . . — Map (db m7059) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 93 — Battery M, 2d U.S. Artillery
U.S.A. Battery M, 2d U.S. Artillery. Lieut. Peter C. Hains, U.S.A. Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) Horse Battery M, 2d U.S. Artillery, crossed the Antietam by the Middle Bridge, in the forenoon of the 17th and, preceded by the 4th Pennsylvania . . . — Map (db m7057) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light ArtilleryCapt. John A. Tompkins
This battery of six rifled 10 lb. Parrott guns provided exceptional support to the Second Corps infantry during their attacks on the Sunken Road. They fired over 1,000 rounds in three hours. At one point, Confederate soldiers charged directly into . . . — Map (db m67714) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862
Bloodiest One-Day Battle in American History As the thundering of artillery and rifle gave way to darkness of night, 23,000 killed and wounded Union and Confederate soldiers covered the fields around Sharpsburg. This inconceivable total gives . . . — Map (db m41703) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Battlefield Namesake
One of the most unique ways that the Battle of Antietam has been commemorated is the naming of U.S. Navy ships after the battle. Ships have been named for Gettysburg, Shiloh, Vicksburg, and there have been at least three ships named Antietam. . . . — Map (db m12231) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Beacon of Peace
"May it stand as it did in war - as a beacon to guide men searching their way through the darkness. May it stand throughout all ages as a symbol of mercy, peace, and understanding." Maryland Governor Millard Tawes Church Rededication . . . — Map (db m20593) HM

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