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Rio Arriba County New Mexico Historical Markers

 
Abiquiú Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, April 28, 2013
Abiquiú Marker
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Abiquiú
Established on the site of an abandoned Indian pueblo, Abiquiú in the mid-18th century became a settlement of Spaniards and genizaros (Hispanicized Indians). In 1776, explorers Fray Francisco Atanacio Dominguez and Fray Silvestre Vélez de Escalante . . . — Map (db m73192) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Coelophysis Quarry — Ghost Ranch
In 1881 David Baldwin discovered small fossilized bones on what is now Ghost Ranch. He mailed the bones to paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope in Philadelphia. Cope had been through the area in the late 1870s and had urged Baldwin to explore and . . . — Map (db m75212) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Georgia O’Keeffe(1887–1986) — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
One of America’s great and most celebrated painters of the twentieth century, Georgia O’Keeffe is known for her unique depictions of natural and architectural forms. She began spending summers painting in Northern New Mexico in 1929 and moved from . . . — Map (db m73124) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Red Rocks
The colorful formations exposed here are the slope forming Chinle Shale of Triassic age, deposited in streams, lakes, and floodplains some 250 million years ago and the cliff-forming Entrada Sandstone of Jurassic age deposited as windblown sand some . . . — Map (db m73158) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Alcalde — Historic Los Luceros
Historic Los Luceros includes a Pueblo Indian ruin and an 18th century rancho/hacienda on Sebastián Martin Serrano's 1703 land grant. Evolving out of family inheritance, local artistry and preservation efforts, the complex contains five adobe . . . — Map (db m45711) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chama — ChamaPopulation 1,199 - Elevation 7,850 ft.
From a small crossroads town, Chama became an important site on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad after 1880. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is a remnant of the San Juan Extension, a narrow-gauge line which once served the mining areas . . . — Map (db m74253) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chama — ChamaPopulation 1,090 - Elevation 7,860 ft.
From a small crossroads town, Chama became an important site on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad after 1880. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is a remnant of the San Juan Extension a narrow-gauge line which once served the mining areas . . . — Map (db m74254) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Chimayo
Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 . . . — Map (db m32819) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Cordova
Cordova, originally named Pueblo Quemado after a nearby burned-out Indian Pueblo, was permanently re-settled in 1750 after Indian attacks. It was renamed Cordova in 1900 after a prominent local family. The village chapel, San Antonio de Padua, is an . . . — Map (db m45675) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Santuario de Chimayó
In 1816, Bernardo Abeyta and the other residents of El Potrero, then a separate community, finished this massive adobe chapel honoring Nuestro Señor de Esquípulas. It is noted for its 6-foot crucifix and its tradition of healing the sick. The . . . — Map (db m32817) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Dulce — Jicarilla Apache (Tribe)Official Scenic Historic Marker
The Jicarilla Apaches, primarily a hunting and gathering group, once occupied vast portions of northeastern New Mexico and southern Colorado. Pressure from Comanche Indians and European settlers eventually pushed them from their homeland. In 1887, . . . — Map (db m104757) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — El Rito
Tewa people lived in this area before the village of El Rito Colorado was settled in the 1830s by residents from the Abiquiú area. The Territorial Legislature of 1909 established the Spanish-American Normal School here to train teachers . . . — Map (db m73394) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — El RitoElevation 6,870 ft.
This village was settled in the 1830s by residents from the Abiquiú area. The Territorial Legislature of 1909 established the Spanish-American Normal School here to train teachers for northern New Mexico schools. After several changes in name and . . . — Map (db m73395) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — Welcome to the Church of San Juan Nepomuceno
This historical church was begun by the first Spanish settlers of the El Rito Valley in 1827 and completed in 1832. Originally flat roofed and with small window openings in the 5 ft. thick walls, it not only served as an imposing temple, but also as . . . — Map (db m64977) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — 1543 — Chimayo Trading Post / Trujillo House
Restored 1939 on site of original 1926 trading post. A Registered Cultural Property State of New Mexico — Map (db m34205) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — Española Valley
When it was described by Gaspar Castano de Sosa in 1591, the Española Valley contained about ten Tewa-speaking pueblos, several of which are still occupied today. Juan de Oñate established New Mexico’s first colony here in 1598. Long on the northern . . . — Map (db m45671) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Española — Dominguez Escalante Trail
On July 29, 1776, two Franciscans, Fray Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Fray Silvestre Velez de Escalante set out on horseback on an expedition from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to Monterey, California. The purpose of the expedition was two-fold: to open . . . — Map (db m73389) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Española — The Bond House
Frank Bond (1863-1945), prominent Española merchant, came from Canada in 1882. In 1887 Bond married May Anna Caffal of Pueblo, Colorado and built the home. The house grew from a two-room adobe to this large structure. Acquired by the city in 1957, . . . — Map (db m45665) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Medanales — Agueda S. Martinez (1898–2000)“You Will Find Me Dancing On the Loom”
Agueda is the matriarch of Hispanic weaving in New Mexico. From a very young age, she was known for her complex designs and natural dyes. She was the subject of the Academy Award-nominated documentary film, “Agueda Martinez: Our People, Our . . . — Map (db m73393) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Ohkay Owingeh — Esther Martinez - P’oe Tsáwäˀ (1912-2006)Ohkay Owingeh
Esther Martinez served her community as an educator, linguist and storyteller. Her foremost contributions to our state are documenting and preserving the Tewa language and the art of storytelling. Esther was named a National Heritage Fellow in 2006 . . . — Map (db m32856) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Ohkay Owingeh — Shrine of Our Lady of LourdesConstructed 1889-1890
[ Panel 1: ] San Juan Parish's Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes was conceived as place of pilgrimage for those faithful wishing to honor Our Lady and to be given a glimpse of her place of apparition to St. Bernadette Soubirou in the . . . — Map (db m32794) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh) — San GabrielOn the Camino Real
Governor Juan de Oñate set up his headquarters in San Juan Pueblo in 1598, but by 1601 he had moved the Spanish capital across the Rio Grande to Yuque-Yunque Pueblo. Named San Gabriel, it served as the seat of government until 1610, when Oñate's . . . — Map (db m32877) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pablita Velarde, Tse Tsan, Golden Dawn(1918-2006) — Santa Clara Pueblo
Pablita Velarde was an internationally acclaimed artist whose paintings largely depicted Pueblo life. She was commissioned by the WPA art's program to paint murals at Bandelier National Monument. Selected as one of New Mexico's "Living Treasures", . . . — Map (db m45663) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pueblo of Santa Clara
Founded around the fourteenth century, Santa Clara traces its ancestry to Puye, an abandoned site of cave dwellings on the Pajarito Plateau. Increasing tensions with the Spanish led to its participation in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The mission . . . — Map (db m45664) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Fort Lowell
Fort Lowell was established in 1866 to protect the Tierra Amarilla area settlements from the Southern Utes. Originally named Camp Plummer this post was garrisoned by a detachment of New Mexico Volunteers, some of whose descendants live in the area. . . . — Map (db m74255) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74256) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74257) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Truchas — Truchas
In 1754, Governor Tomás Vélez Cachupín granted land on the Rio Truchas to families from Santa Cruz and Chimayó. Because Nuestra Señora de Rosario de Truchas was on the northern frontier, and subject to attack by Plains Indians, the governor . . . — Map (db m64915) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Truchas — Truchas Peaks
Ice age glaciers carved these beautiful alpine peaks, among the highest in the New Mexico Rockies, rising to 13,101 feet. Precambrian quartzite, some of the oldest rock in New Mexico, forms the core of the Truchas (“trout”) Peaks, part . . . — Map (db m64916) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Velarde — VelardeOn the Camino Real
Founded in 1875, this small farming community was named La Jolla. It was once famous for finely woven blankets. Here the Camino Real left the Rio Grande and followed a canyon northeast to Embudo Creek where it began a climb over the mountains to . . . — Map (db m43810) HM

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