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New Hanover County North Carolina Historical Markers

 
Early Drawbridge Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
Early Drawbridge Marker
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Castle Hayne — D-22 — Early Drawbridge
One of the few drawbridges in the American colonies was built near here by Benjamin Heron about 1768. Destroyed by British troops, 1781. — Map (db m29204) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Castle Hayne — D-90 — James Innesca. 1700–1759
Commanded N.C. troops at Cartagena, 1740; led colonial forces, 1754–56, in French and Indian War. Grave 4 miles west. — Map (db m28824) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — A Trophy of War
After the fall of Fort Fisher, the Armstrong gun became a war trophy and the focus of photographs and newspaper articles. Union soldiers, such as Captain Trickey of the 3rd New Hampshire, noted the “elegantly mounted Armstrong gun … the . . . — Map (db m28683) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — Battery BuchananFort Fisher’s Last Stand — Confederate Lifeline
These are the remnants of Battery Buchanan, named for Confederate Adm. Franklin Buchanan. It was constructed in 1864 to guard this point and also to serve as “a citadel to which an overpowered garrison might retreat.” It was the last . . . — Map (db m28637) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 2 — Blockade-Running
The agricultural South imported many things from Europe, particularly Great Britain. The North blockaded southern ports to stop this trade. In response, the Confederates used fast ships for blockade-running. — Map (db m28666) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 13 — Blockade-Running
Steam-powered blockade-runners, usually British, made 1,300 attempts to enter Southern ports with vital supplies during the Civil War. More than 1,000 of the trips succeeded. The most successful vessels were specially built for the . . . — Map (db m28680) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 11 — Capture!
The Union fleet returned in January 1865 and fired another 20,000 shells in three days. Supported by this massive gunfire and a naval landing party, the U.S. Army captured the fort on January 15. — Map (db m28678) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 14 — Fighting the Sea - Saving the Fort
Seacoast erosion, intensified by hurricanes and other major storms, has been a problem and controversial issue at Fort Fisher and elsewhere along the North Carolina coast for decades. Erosion at Fort Fisher intensified after the 1930s. By 1968 . . . — Map (db m28681) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — D 12 — Fort Fisher
Built by Confederacy. Its fall, Jan. 15, 1865, closed Wilmington, last important southern port for blockade running. — Map (db m28632) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — Fort FisherState Historical Site
Largest earthen coastal fortification in the Confederacy. Original construction commenced May, 1861 and continued until December, 1864, when the fort came under Federal assault. Fort Fisher kept Wilmington open to blockade runners, providing a . . . — Map (db m28634) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — Fort Fisher Monument
(south face) In memory of those men of the Confederate States Army who for more than three years manned the guns of Fort Fisher under command of Colonel William Lamb Major General W.H.C. Whiting and Major James Reilly. . . . — Map (db m28640) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 12 — Fort Fisher Since 1865
Union troops briefly occupied Fort Fisher. Since then the only military activity here was training in World War II. — Map (db m28679) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — Fort Fisher’s Armstrong Cannon
The most effective gun in the fort. – Col. William Lamb, Fort Fisher commander The Confederacy relied heavily on English artillery during the Civil War. A variety of English cannons, including Whitworths and Blakelys, were imported . . . — Map (db m28682) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 4 — Growth of Fort Fisher, 1861-1862
In April 1861 Capt. Charles P. Bolles began building individual gun batteries at Confederate Point. — Map (db m28669) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — Headquarters of Fort Fisher
Here stood the Headquarters of Fort Fisher. The construction of the fort began in the summer of 1862 under the direction of Colonel William Lamb Commandant, who with General W.H.C. Whiting and Major James Reilly served until the fort was . . . — Map (db m28635) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 3 — History Trail
In the Civil War Fort Fisher kept the port of Wilmington open for crucial supplies from Europe. The fort finally fell in January 1865 after two of the largest sea-land battles of the war. — Map (db m28667) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 5 — Lamb Expands the Fort, 1862-1865
Col. William Lamb took command on July 4, 1862. For two years over 1,000 soldiers, slaves, and free blacks worked six days a week. J.A. McMillan, a soldier at Fort Fisher, wrote: “They everlastingly make us work. … We work nine hours . . . — Map (db m28670) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 7 — Restoration of Shepherd’s Battery
Over the years man and nature destroyed much of Fort Fisher. Restoration of this battery was based on archaeological, historical, and photographic evidence. — Map (db m28673) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 6 — River Road Sally Port
The River Road sally port was the fort’s main land entrance. At 3:30 p.m. on January 15, 1865, Union infantry charged into this end of the fort. — Map (db m28672) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 8 — Shepherd’s Battery
Shepherd’s, one of the oldest batteries in the fort, guarded its western end. — Map (db m28674) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 8 — Shepherd’s Battery
Shepherd’s, one of the oldest batteries in the fort, guarded its western end. — Map (db m28675) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 9 — Shepherd’s Bombproof
Improved artillery made brick forts obsolete. Rooms covered with sand provided better protection for defenders. — Map (db m28676) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — 10 — Union Fiasco - The First Battle
On Christmas Day 1864 Federal warships engaged the fort. Approximately 2,700 Union infantry disembarked from the Union transports. However, the absence of army/navy cooperation, bad weather, and rumors of rebel reinforcements prevented the success . . . — Map (db m28677) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Kure Beach — D 102 — W.H.C. Whiting1824 - 1865
Confederate major general and engineer. He devised the Cape Fear defense system. Wounded nearby in fall of fort. Died in Union hospital. — Map (db m28633) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilington — D-78 — St. Mark’s
Consecrated in 1875 as first Episcopal church for colored people in North Carolina. Served by Bishop Atkinson. It is located 3 blocks east. — Map (db m28872) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 an April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m77249) WM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 59 — Adam Empie, D.D.
First chaplain of U.S. Military Academy, West Point, 1813-1817; president William and Mary College; rector St. James Church. Grave ¾ mi. N.E. — Map (db m28724) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Adrian House1875 — James F. Post, Architect / Additions c.1909, 1914
Aldrich Adrian (1834-1897) and wife Christine Fraas (1850-1937) natives of Germany, built the Tuscan villa style house in 1875. Adrian was a city alderman and co-owner of Adrian & Vollers, wholesale grocery. The Z.W. Whitehead family owned the . . . — Map (db m77221) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 103 — Alex Manly1866-1944
Edited black-owned Daily Record four blocks east. Mob burned his office, Nov. 10, 1898, leading to "race riot" & restrictions on black voting in N.C. — Map (db m64779) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D-60 — Beery’s Shipyard
Many Confederate naval vessels, including the ironclad “North Carolina,” built here. Site lies across river on Eagles Island, ¼ mile west. — Map (db m28627) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Beery's Shipyard
On the west side of the river a little south of the causeway was Berry's Shipyard, where the Confederate ironclad North Carolina was built in 1862 for the protection of the port. The ironclad Raleigh was constructed at . . . — Map (db m28628) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Benjamin Beery House1854; 1887
Italianate style house built for Benjamin Washington Beery (1822-1892), partner in Cassidey & Beery Shipyard; and wife, Ann Eliza Williams (1827-1865). Served as school and convent of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy,1869-1870. Double piazzas added . . . — Map (db m77204) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D-71 — Cape Fear Club
Founded in 1866; oldest men’s social club in N.C. Guilford F. Dudley, first president, Building here in use since 1913. — Map (db m28938) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Cassidey Shipyard
Confederate shipyard and outfitting station which completed the ironclad steam sloop Raleigh in 1863. Site is three blocks west. — Map (db m28626) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 67 — Catherine Kennedy Home
For the elderly. Grew from Ladies Benevolent Society, founded, 1845. First home, 1879, stood four blocks east. — Map (db m28730) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Charles Cornwallis
This building was occupied by Lord Charles Cornwallis, Commander in Chief of the British army, in April, 1781. In the basement was a military prison. New Hanover Historical Commission. A.J. Howell. E.S. Martin James . . . — Map (db m28722) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Confederate Soldiers Monument
(front) 1861-1865 To the soldiers of the Confederacy Confederates blend your recollections Let memory weave its bright reflections Let love revive life’s ashen embers For love is life since love remembers PRO ARIS ET . . . — Map (db m28642) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Daggett-Taylor House1897 — Silva & Savage, Builders
Queen Anne style house built for Eliza Whitehead Daggett (1846-1907), widow of William T. Daggett (1832-1893), partner in firm of Hancock & Daggett, paint and oil dealers, purchased in 1911 by Edgar Taylor (1858-1922), wholesale fish dealer; and . . . — Map (db m77206) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 105 — David Walkerca. 1796-1830
His Appeal, influential 1829 pamphlet, denounced slavery. A free black, he grew up in Wilmington; moved to Boston by 1825. — Map (db m28717) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 17 — Edward B. Dudley1789 - 1855
Governor, 1836-41, the first in N.C. elected by popular vote; first president of Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. His home stands 2 blocks W. — Map (db m28746) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 40 — Edwin A. Alderman1861-1931
Crusader for education. President, UNC, 1896-1900; Tulane, 1900-04; Virginia, 1904-31. This was his birthplace. — Map (db m77231) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 47 — Edwin A. Anderson
Admiral, U.S. Navy. Received Congressional recognition for service in War with Spain, at Vera Cruz; and in World War I. Home is 4 mi. E. — Map (db m77131) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 101 — Fall of Wilmington
Union assault on Hoke's entrenched Confederates led to the city's fall, February 22, 1865. Earthworks were nearby, — Map (db m77134) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Fanning Housec. 1850 — J.C. and R.B. Wood, Builders
Italianate style house built for Phineas Wines Fanning (1799-1880), native of Nantucket, MA; editor and publisher of the Wilmington Free Press; house, ship and sign painter. He was master of St. John's Masonic Lodge and Grand Master of Masons in . . . — Map (db m77222) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — General Benjamin Smith
. . . — Map (db m28762) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 36 — George Davis1820 - 1896
Confederate senator, 1862-64, and attorney general, 1864-65. Home was 2 blocks E.; grave is ½ mile northeast. — Map (db m28623) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — George Davis
(west face) George Davis Senator and Attorney General of the Confederate States of America 1820-1896 (south face) Scholar Patriot Statesman Christian (east face) His wisdom illustrated the . . . — Map (db m28641) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 35 — George Davis
Confederate Senator, 1862-64, and Attorney General, 1864-65. Birthplace stood 3 mi. east. — Map (db m77130) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — George Washington
. . . — Map (db m42132) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Grace Methodist ChurchOrganized December 24, 1797
Since that date four sanctuaries have burned, 1803–1843–1886–1947. Present imposing and lovely church was dedicated to the glory of God and service to mankind May 15, 1955. Body of Reverend Wm. Meredith, founder of Methodism in . . . — Map (db m28940) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 88 — Gregory Normal Institute
School for blacks, 1868-1921. Founded by American Missionary Assoc. Named for benefactor James H. Gregory. Was 4 blocks E. — Map (db m28749) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 50 — Henry Bacon1866-1924
Architect of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington and many other public structures. Home is here, grave, Oakdale Cemetery. — Map (db m28726) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 83 — James F. Shober1853-1889
1st known black physician with an M.D. degree in N.C. Practiced 1878-89. Home and office stood one block north. — Map (db m77253) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 41 — James Gibbons
Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, 1886-1921. Installed as vicar apostolic of North Carolina (1868-72) at St. Thomas Church ½ bl. W. — Map (db m28725) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 72 — James Hasell
Acting governor, 1771; thrice Chief Justice, 1750-1766; President of the Council. Owned large library. Home 7 mi. S.E. — Map (db m28739) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 51 — James Sprunt
Author of "Chronicles of the Cape Fear River" (1914), cotton merchant, philanthropist, British vice consul. His home stands two blocks west. — Map (db m28742) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 43 — John A. Winslow
Capt. U.S.S. "Kearsarge", which sank Confederate raider "Alabama", 1864, rear admiral U.S. Navy, 1870-1873. Birthplace was one block west. — Map (db m28620) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 15 — John Burgwin1731-1803
Merchant, planter, and colonial official. Built this house, 1770-1771. His "Hermitage" estate was eight miles north. — Map (db m28720) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 61 — John N. Maffitt
Captain of Confederate cruiser “Florida” and ironclad “Albemarle.” With U.S. Coast Survey, 1842-1858. Blockade runner; Grave 14 blks. N.E. — Map (db m77254) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 64 — Johnson Jones Hooper
Editor and humorist, creator of “Simon Suggs” and other characters of the Southern frontier. Born in this city, 1815. — Map (db m77239) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 56 — Judah P. Benjamin
United States Senator, Confederate Attorney General, Secretary of War, & of State, later lawyer in England. His early home was here. — Map (db m28625) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Last Stand At WilmingtonThe Forks Road Engagement — Confederate Lifeline
Here, in the earthworks in front of you, Confederate Gen. Robert F. Hoke’s troops made a stand on February 20-21, 1865. They were attempting to halt the Union army’s advance on Wilmington, the Confederacy’s principal seaport. Blockade runners, . . . — Map (db m28636) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Leora Hiatt McEachernMarch 4, 1909 – November 17, 1982
A student of history, a seeker of truth, a faithful follower of Christ, “Millie” dedicated herself to a study of the past in order that it could be part of our future. — Map (db m28918) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Louis Toomer Moore1885-1961
Historian, preservationist, journalist, photographer. Director, Chamber of Commerce. A founder of Lower Cape Fear Historical Society. Chairman, New Hanover County Historical Commission. Member of area's pioneer family. His pictures & records in . . . — Map (db m28729) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 38 — Mary Baker Glover Eddy
Founder of Christian Science Church. Spent part of 1844 at Hanover House, 2 blocks west. — Map (db m28755) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 96 — North Carolina Shipbuilding Co.
Constructed 243 vessels at shipyard one mile west, 1941-1946. Its first Liberty Ship, the S.S. Zebulon B. Vance, launched Dec. 6, 1941. — Map (db m77135) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 69 — Oakdale Cemetery
Est. in 1852. Includes graves of Confederate leaders, officers, and soldiers, & victims of yellow fever epidemic. Six blocks N. — Map (db m77252) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 2 — Old Courthouse
Stood two blocks west. Here a stamp master, William Houston, was forced to resign, 1765, and safety committees met in 1775. — Map (db m28754) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Powell - Yopp House — c. 1861 — Additions c. 1898, 1915
Greek Revival house, built for Robert Power (1824–1862), carriage maker, and wife Sarah (1823–1888). Willed to Sarah E. H. Yopp (1829–1904). Craftsman style additions made by grandson, Alfred Harding Yopp (1876–1973), . . . — Map (db m28942) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Residence of Edward B. Dudley
This building was the residence of Edward B. Dudley, first Governor of North Carolina. Elected by the people, in 1836. Here Daniel Webster was entertained by Governor Dudley on May 5, 1847, and here Present William H. Taft was the guest of James . . . — Map (db m77205) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 57 — Rose Greenhow
Confederate spy and Washington society woman. Drowned near Fort Fisher in 1864, while running Federal blockade. Grave 1 m. N.E. — Map (db m28622) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Sprunt House1912 — Kenneth M. Murchison of New York Architect
First example of the Italian Renaissance style house in Wilmington built for James Laurence Sprunt (1886-1973), agent for Alexander Sprunt & Son, the world's largest cotton exporter; and wife, Amoret Cameron Price (1891-1915), native of . . . — Map (db m77208) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 5 — St. James Church
Built 1839, near site of older church, begun about 1751. Graves of Cornelius Harnett and Thomas Godfrey. — Map (db m28757) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — St. James ChurchThomas U. Walter, Architect – Philadelphia — 1839/40; 1885
Thomas U. Walter, Architect – Philadelphia John S. Norris, Supervising Architect – New York C. H. Dahl, Principal Carpenter – New York John C. Wood, Principal Mason – Nantucket Oldest house of worship in Wilmington, . . . — Map (db m28925) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 107 — St. John's Lodge
First Masonic lodge in North Carolina. Est. in 1754. Building erected 1804, used until 1825, is one block west. — Map (db m28728) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — St. Mark’s Episcopal ChurchEmerson and Fehmer, Boston, Architects; Alfred Howe, Builder — 1871–1875
Gothic Revival style church built for congregation organized in 1869. The cornerstone was laid March 23, 1871 and the edifice completed under the leadership of the Rev. Charles O. Brady. Dedicated on March 23, 1871, it was the first Episcopal church . . . — Map (db m28877) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 77 — St. Stephen A.M.E. Church
Congregation formed in 1865. Present church constructed 1880 on land donated by Geo. Peabody. Located 2 blocks east. — Map (db m77229) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 23 — State Salt Works
The state of North Carolina to relieve a wartime scarcity, operated salt works from here to Myrtle Grove Sound, 1861-64. — Map (db m77132) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 44 — Temple of Israel
Erected 1875-6. First house of worship built in North Carolina by the Jews. Congregation established in 1867. — Map (db m28758) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 87 — Thomas Atkinson1807 - 1881
Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of N.C., 1853-1881. Voice for church unity in postwar years. Interred in the church. — Map (db m28753) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D-39 — Thomas F. Price
Roman Catholic priest, pioneer Home Missionary of N.C. Co-founder of “Maryknoll Fathers,” a foreign mission society. Birthplace (1860) one block east. — Map (db m29967) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 81 — Thomas F. Wood1841-1892
Organizer & Sec.-Treas. of State Board of Health, 1877-1892. Founded N.C. Medical Journal in 1878. Home was 1 block west. — Map (db m28718) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Thomas Godfrey
Near this spot lies Thomas Godfrey Born in Philadelphia Pa. 1736 Died in Wilmington N.C. 1763 Author of The Prince of Parthia The first drama written by an American and produced upon the professional stage in the Colonies . . . — Map (db m28759) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — U.S.S. North Carolina Battleship MemorialIn Memoriam
The U.S.S. North Carolina Battleship Memorial commemorates the heroic participation of the men and women of North Carolina in the prosecution and victory of the Second World War, and perpetuates the memory of the more than ten thousand North . . . — Map (db m83989) HM WM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 111 — United States Colored Troops
Black soldiers & white officers in Union army, 1863-1865. About 500 involved in Wilmington campaign buried here. — Map (db m77251) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D-86 — USS North Carolina
USS North Carolina-World War II battleship. Launched, June 13, 1940. Served in Pacific. 1942-1945. Decommissioned 1947. Berthed here 1961 — Map (db m62510) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 19 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington was a guest Apr. 24-25, 1791, at the Quince home which stood 2 blocks W. — Map (db m28723) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 9 — Whistler's Mother
Anna McNeill Whistler, the mother of James Whistler, artist, was born in a house which stood one block east. — Map (db m77210) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — William E. Worth House1912
Queen Anne style house built for William Elliott Worth (1850-1923), founder of W.E. Worth & Co., Ice Manufacturers; Secretary-Treasurer and General Manager of Universal Oil & Fertilizer Co; and wife, Nellie Shay (1853-1921), native of Brooklyn, . . . — Map (db m77220) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — William G. Craig House — 1893
Queen Anne style house built for William Gaston Craig (1861–1957), native of Alamance Co., N.C., an wife Sarah Frances (1867–1958), native of Goldsboro, N.C. He was inspector for Atlantic Coast Line Railroad car building department. . . . — Map (db m29011) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 45 — William Hooper
One of North Carolina's three signers of the Declaration of Independence. Home was here. — Map (db m28719) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — William Tryon
Here stood the residence of William Tryon Governor of North Carolina, from April 3,1765, to June 30, 1771. Stamp Master William Houston was brought out from the house and forced to resign his office Nov. 16, 1765. New Hanover . . . — Map (db m28760) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 42 — William W. Loring
Major general in the Confederate Army, lieut. colonel in Mexican War, general in Egyptian Army, 1870-79. His birthplace was 1 bl. W. — Map (db m28624) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 20 — Wilmington and Weldon Railroad
Longest railroad in the World when completed in 1840. Length 161-½ mi. Terminus was 4 blocks W. — Map (db m77233) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Wilmington College
Founded in 1947 by New Hanover County. The forerunner of UNC Wilmington operated until 1961 in Isaac Bear Elementary School, which stood 75 feet south. — Map (db m77236) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Wilmington Light InfantryArmory Building
This plaque is presented to the Wilmington Light Infantry which served with distinction in: The Civil War, The Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II. This plaque is to be prominently displayed on the Washington Light Infantry . . . — Map (db m28644) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 31 — Woodrow Wilson
President of the United States, 1913-1921. His home, 1874-1882, was the Presbyterian manse, which stood one block E. — Map (db m28731) HM

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