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Humphreys County Tennessee Historical Markers

 
Home Place of Loretta Lynn image, Touch for more information
By Don Morfe, May 30, 1998
Home Place of Loretta Lynn
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Hurricane Mills — Home Place of Loretta Lynn
This re-created “Home Place” of Loretta Lynn, originally located in Butcher Holler, KY has been built in memory of Loretta’s parents Ted & Clara Webb and to portray the rags to riches legacy of “The Coal Miner’s Daughter”. — Map (db m95595) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Hurricane Mills — Hurricane Mills
This mill and dam were built by James T. Anderson in 1896 Though wool was carded here, grain processing predominated. Corn meal and flour were shipped throughout the south. Restored by Loretta and Mooney Lynn, with whose permission this . . . — Map (db m51735) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), McEwen — 3E 26 — Yellow Bank Trestle
Located 1/2 mile east is the site of a wooden railroad trestle built for the Nashville & Northwestern Railroad during the Civil War. The 12th and 13th U.S. Colored Infantry constructed the trestle and 1305 feet of earthworks. They built another . . . — Map (db m74379) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — Battle of JohnsonvilleUp in Smoke
Johnsonville was a major Federal supply depot on the Tennessee River at the western terminus of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad, completed in May 1864. Col. Charles R. Thompson commanded the 2,000-man garrison here. The 12th, 13th, and 100th . . . — Map (db m74390) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — Forrest's Opening MoveThe Battle of Johnsonville — November 4, 1864
Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s army held Atlanta and was poised to strike deeper into the Confederacy. Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford B. Forrest was determined to cut off Sherman’s supplies and cripple the Union campaign. In November 1864, Forrest . . . — Map (db m74396) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — 3E 21 — Jesse James
In August 1877, Jesse James, the notorious outlaw, moved to this site from Missouri and rented a farm from N.B. Link. Using the assumed name of J.D. Howard, he engaged in farming and horse racing. He entered one of his horses, Red Fox, in local . . . — Map (db m52583) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — JohnsonvilleConstructing a Military Depot
As the Union military occupation spread over Middle Tennessee, Federal commanders needed a supply depot on the Tennessee River. By 1863, they agree that such a depot, navigable year around, would provide Union armies in the west with a stream of . . . — Map (db m74391) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — Nashville and Northwestern Railroad
Before you is the old railbed of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. In 1863, the Union army extended the railroad to the Tennessee River, creating a reliable and secure supply line between the Ohio River and Nashville. Building the . . . — Map (db m74427) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — 3E 12 — Old Johnsonville
This town was named for Andrew Johnson, military governor of Tennessee (1862 - 65). Although the community had been a steamboat landing prior to the Civil War, it was not until the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad was completed by the Union Army . . . — Map (db m51684) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — The Tennessee River in the Civil War
The Tennessee River flows from the mountains of east Tennessee to the Ohio River at Paducah, Kentucky. In the 19th century it was navigable from the Ohio to Great Bend at Muscle Shoals in northern Alabama. Steamboats and gunboats could move freely . . . — Map (db m82190) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — The Town of Johnsonville
A civilian community grew up beside the army supply depot, providing goods and services to soldiers and civilian workers. After the Civil War, Johnsonville's economy revolved around the river and the railroad. Johnsonville ceased to exist in the . . . — Map (db m74425) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — The Union Supply Depot
Johnsonville was a vital cog in the Union war machine. At this busy, noisy, sprawling complex of wharves, docks, warehouses and corrals the work of war continued unabated. Steamboats crowded the wharf. Day in and day out, laborers moved everything . . . — Map (db m82191) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), New Johnsonville — United States Colored Troops at Johnsonville
United States Colored Troops formed the majority of Johnsonville's garrison. They played a crucial role in the construction of the depot and its defensive works. They garrisoned the blockhouse defending the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad and . . . — Map (db m82192) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — 3E 24 — Battle of Johnsonville
On November 4, 1864, Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest's Confederate cavalry attacked and destroyed the river port of Johnsonville located ten miles west of here on the Tennessee River. Union losses included four gunboats, fourteen steamboats, . . . — Map (db m52611) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — Court House Bell
Preserved here for future generations is the original bell installed in the County Court House erected on this public square in 1899. This bell may have existed in the earlier court houses erected here in 1836 and 1878 both of which were destroyed . . . — Map (db m74382) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — 3E 25 — Fort Hill
Five hundred yards north is a Federal Civil War earthen fort constructed by the 12th and 13th U.S. Colored Infantry to protect the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. The 1st Kansas Artillery was stationed there. The railroad from Johnsonville to . . . — Map (db m74384) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — Fort Hill at WaverlyDefending Railroads
The earthen fort in front of you, known as Fort Hill, was the headquarters of the 13th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), led by Col. John A. Hottenstein, from the fall of 1863 to the end of the war. The fort defended the army-operated railroad that ran . . . — Map (db m82963) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — Humphreys County
Established October 19, 1809; Named in honor of Parry W. Humphreys, Judge, Superior Court of Law and Equity, 1807-09; Circuit Judge, Fifth District, Law and Equity, 1809-12 and 1818-36. Member of Congress, 1813-1815. — Map (db m74380) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — 3E 10 — Reynoldsburg
Six miles northwest, where Dry Creek enters the Tennessee River, this town was first settled from 1800 to 1805. In 1812, it became the county seat of Humphreys County, with the first court meeting in the home of Samuel Parker on Trace Creek. The . . . — Map (db m52587) HM
Tennessee (Humphreys County), Waverly — Welcome to Fort Waverly & The Humphreys County and Civil War Museum
Fort Waverly was built by Union troops between 1863 and 1864. It protected a newly completed railroad line that connected the important Union supply depot on the Tennessee River in Johnsonville with Federally held Nashville. Confederate guerillas . . . — Map (db m68920) HM

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