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Botetourt County Virginia Historical Markers

 
Bedford County Face of Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, July 1, 2012
Bedford County Face of Marker
Virginia (Botetourt County), Blue Ridge — Z-68 — Botetourt County / Bedford CountyArea 548 Square Miles / Area 791 Square Miles
Botetourt County. Formed in 1769 from Augusta, and named for Lord Botetourt, Governor of Virginia, 1768–1770. Buchanan was the western terminus of the noted James River and Kanawha Canal. Bedford County. Formed in 1753 from . . . — Map (db m57734) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — A-58 — Buchanan
The town was established in 1811 and named for Colonel John Buchanan, pioneer and soldier. It was incorporated in 1833. Its importance consisted in its being the western terminus of the James River and Kanawha Canal, which reached the town in 1851. . . . — Map (db m23810) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Buchanan & The James River & Kanawha CanalCelebrating more than two centuries of history
Buchanan, Virginia is the western terminus of the James River & Kanawha Canal. Considered one of Virginia’s most remarkable engineering feats ever attempted, the Canal’s beginnings stretch back to 1785, when George Washington appeared before the . . . — Map (db m55794) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Buchanan BridgeAn Artillery Duel Ensued — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55777) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — A-91 — Looney's Ferry
Looney's Ferry, established in 1742, was the first crossing over James River in this region. On the other side of the river was Cherry Tree Bottom, home of Colonel John Buchanan, and above the mouth of this creek stood Fort Fauquier, 1758-1763. — Map (db m23823) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Mount JoyIndustrial Connections — Hunter's Raid
On May 26, 1864, Union Gen, David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of Gen. Ulysses S. . . . — Map (db m67253) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Peaks of Otter
Straight ahead are SharpTop Mountain and Flat Top Mountain. They are two of the three prominent summits that surround the Peaks of Otter area, approximately 6.5 miles distant. No one knows for certain why the area is called the Peaks of Otter. The . . . — Map (db m95955) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — The AnchorageUnexpected Guests — Hunter's Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55779) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — The Botetourt Artillery1861-1865 — C.S.A.
(East Face) In Commemoration of the deeds and services of the Buchanan Company. Organized Oct. 1859, as the Mountain Rifles Virginia Volunteers. Enlisted May 1861, in the Confederate States Army, for twelve months, as Co. 1-H-28 Regiment . . . — Map (db m23822) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Wilson Warehouse“Fit only for … owls and bats.” — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55775) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Cloverdale — A-82 — Cloverdale Furnace
Here was situated Cloverdale Furnace, and early iron industry, developed by Carter Beverly, in 1808. — Map (db m62982) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Cloverdale — A-81 — Old Carolina Road
This is the old road from Pennsylvania to the Yadkin Valley, over which in early times settlers passed going south. On it were the Black Horse Tavern and the Tinker Creek Presbyterian Church. — Map (db m62980) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Daleville — D-41 — Daleville College
Daleville College began as a private school that Church of the Brethren educator Isaac N. H. Beahm conducted for the children of Benjamin F. Nininger and George Layman in 1890. The construction of school buildings began the following year. In . . . — Map (db m63212) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Daleville — D-30 — Greenfield
Half a mile west stood Greenfield, the home of Col. William Preston. According to local tradition, Stephen Rentfroe constructed a fort there in the 1740s. In 1759, Preston bought the property from Rentfroe and soon built a house that evolved into a . . . — Map (db m62983) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Fincastle — D-39 — Botetourt County Courthouse Fire
On 15 December 1970, fire gutted the 1848 Greek Revival-style Botetourt County courthouse. Amid the charred wreckage, in a secure vault, the county’s historic records fortunately survived almost unharmed. Because of the near-loss of the . . . — Map (db m84188) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Fincastle — D-33 — Breckinridge Mill
Breckingridge Mill is a rare survivor of the grain and milling industry that figured significantly in the economy of antebellum Virginia. The three-and-a-half story brick structure was erected in 1822 for James Breckinridge, and is one of the oldest . . . — Map (db m84225) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Fincastle — D-28 — Fincastle
Miller’s place here was selected as the county seat of Botetourt in 1770. In 1772 the town of Fincastle was established on land donated by Israel Christian and named for Lord Fincastle, eldest son of Governor Lord Dunmore. It was incorporated in . . . — Map (db m84192) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Fincastle — D-29 — Fort William
Col. William Preston constructed Fort William nearby in 1755 during the French and Indian War (1754 – 1763) as one in a series of fortifications to protect Virginia’s frontier. A group of Indians paid a friendly visit in Oct. 1755, and Col. . . . — Map (db m62979) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Fincastle — D-32 — Santillane
Near here is Santillane, one of Botetourt County’s most distinguished properties. The Greek Revival house sits on a tract of land originally owned by Colonel George Hancock, a member of the United States Congress from 1793-1797. In 1808 . . . — Map (db m84203) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Flatwoods — D-31 — Roanoke Valley Baptist Association
The (Roanoke) Valley Baptist Association was organized on 7 August 1841 at nearby Zion Hill Baptist Church. Seventeen congregations constituted the original fellowship of churches; during the next century and a half membership grew to more than . . . — Map (db m84226) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Greyledge — A-92 — Cartmill's Gap
This gap, just west, is named for Henry Cartmill who acquired land nearby on Purgatory Creek. During the French and Indian War (1754-1763), conflicts between Indians and settlers increased in this area. In 1757, Indians laid waste to several nearby . . . — Map (db m18817) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Harvey — A-48 — Audley Paul’s Fort
Nearby stood Capt. Audley Paul’s fort, built in 1757 during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) as one in a series of fortifications to protect Virginia's frontier. Paul served as a lieutenant in Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock’s ill-fated . . . — Map (db m43110) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Nace — A-80 — Coming of the Railroad
Near here took place the historic meeting of John C. Moomaw and C. M. Thomas that led to the termination of the Shenandoah Valley Railroad at Big Lick (now Roanoke), April, 1881. This was the beginning of the city of Roanoke. — Map (db m23824) HM

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