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Caroline County Virginia Historical Markers

 
Campaign of 1781 Marker in Front of the Caroline County Courthouse image, Touch for more information
By Paul Jordan, August 1, 2010
Campaign of 1781 Marker in Front of the Caroline County Courthouse
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — ND-7 — Campaign of 1781
Lafayette, marching from Head of Elk, Maryland, to Richmond, camped here the night of April 27, 1781. — Map (db m14100) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Caroline County CourthouseUnion Troops Filled the Roads to Richmond — Lee Vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign
On May 21, 1864, Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s Second Corps passed through Bowling Green. Union soldiers broke into stores, looted homes and freed prisoners from the jail. Documents from the ransacked courthouse littered the streets. A few bold souls . . . — Map (db m12965) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Caroline County World War I Memorial
In honor of the 461 men of Caroline County who served their country during the Great World War of 1914 - 1918. Their names are recorded at the clerk's office the following made the supreme sacrifice E.C. Purks, Robert Cooper, Lawless . . . — Map (db m34457) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Caroline County, Virginia
(front of marker) The first African-American slaves were brought to Caroline County around 1700. Few records were kept of their existence, except for their status and value as property and the occasional brush with the law. Many slaves of . . . — Map (db m34350) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Caroline Veterans Memorial
"For Those Who Fought For It, Freedom Has A Taste The Protected Will Never Know." (back of marker) A project of H.E.L.P. Bowling Green with the generous support of: Citizens of Caroline, E.M. Gray & son, Dr. Cathie Butterworth, . . . — Map (db m34349) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Confederate Monument
(front of marker) Erected by the people of Caroline County to commemorate the valor and endurance of its soldiers furnished to the Army of the Confederate States of America 1861 - 1865. (right side of marker) 9th Regiment Va. . . . — Map (db m34324) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — E-230 — John Cephas(1930–2009)
Born in Washington D.C., John Cephas grew up there and in Caroline County. He was influenced at an early age by his mother's singing. A cousin taught him the highly syncopated and danceable guitar style now known as Piedmont Blues, . . . — Map (db m75730) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Star HotelConspirator's Lair
Built approximately 1820, the Star Hotel was one of two taverns serving Bowling Green. During the Civil War, it was operated by the Henry Gouldman family, and became a notorious Confederate spy headquarters and safe haven to those who aided Lincoln . . . — Map (db m4527) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Carmel Church — Carmel ChurchGathering for North Anna — Lee vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign
The scattered corps of the Union army reunited here at Carmel Church (known during the war as Mount Carmel Church) on May 23 before attacking Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee across the North Anna River, approximately three miles ahead. Gen. Winfield . . . — Map (db m3693) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Carmel Church — E-25 — Grant’s Operations
Here, at Mount Carmel Church, on May 23, 1864, Hancock’s (Second) Corps turned south to the North Anna River; Warren’s (Fifth) Corps and Wright’s (Sixth) Corps here turned west to Jericho Mills on the River. Grant had his headquarters in the church . . . — Map (db m3696) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Carmel Church — E-24 — Long Creek Action
The earthworks in the angle between this stream and the North Anna River, held by a small Confederate force, were taken by Grant's troops moving southward on May 23, 1864. The Unionists then advanced to the river, on the south side of which was . . . — Map (db m86146) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Chilesburg — E-100 — William Clark Birthplace
William Clark was born to John and Ann Rogers Clark on 1 Aug. 1770 on the family farm about one mile north. The Clark family moved to Louisville, Kentucky, in 1784. William Clark served in the Kentucky militia and in the Indian campaigns in the . . . — Map (db m22561) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Doswell — Z-155 — Caroline County / Hanover County
Caroline County Area 529 Square Miles Formed in 1727 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William. Named for Queen Carline, wife of King George II. George Rogers Clark, Conqueror of the Northwest, passed his youth in this county. . . . — Map (db m10642) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Doswell — ND-1 — Early Indian Tool Making Camps
On this site overlooking the North Anna River, archaeological investigations conducted in 2006 in cooperation with Virginia tribes identified toolmaking camps dating to 8000 B.C. Indians used these camps repeatedly, especially from about 1000 B.C. . . . — Map (db m10640) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Doswell — E-23 — Lee and Grant
Lee and Grant faced each other on the North Anna, May 23-26, 1864. Union forces crossed here and four miles to the west but found they could not dislodge Lee's center, which rested on the stream. Grant then turned east to Cold Harbor. — Map (db m10644) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Doswell — ND-10 — Meadow FarmBirthplace of Secretariat
This famous horsebreeding farm was established in 1936 by Christopher T. Chenery and continued under the management of his daughter, Helen “Penny” Chenery until 1979. Secretariat (1970–-1989), also known as “Big Red,” . . . — Map (db m1890) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Edgar — Z-246 — Caroline County / King William
(obverse) Caroline County Area 529 Square Miles Formed in 1727 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William. Named for Queen Caroline, wife of King George II. George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest, passed his youth in . . . — Map (db m17789) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Fredericksburg — Z-200 — Caroline County / Spotsylvania CountyArea 529 Square Miles / Area 413 Square Miles
Caroline County. Area 529 Square Miles. Formed in 1727 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William. Named for Queen Caroline, wife of King George II. George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest, passed his youth in this . . . — Map (db m22585) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Fredericksburg — N-11 — Jackson's Headquarters
In an outhouse here at Moss Neck, Stonewall Jackson had his headquarters, December, 1862-March, 1863. He was engaged in guarding the line of the Rappahannock with his corps of Lee's army. — Map (db m19286) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Golinsville — E-110 — Golansville Quaker Meetinghouse
Pioneers in asserting the right to religious freedom, the Caroline Friends (Quakers) held their first meeting nearby on 12 March 1739 together with their partner, Cedar Creek Friends Meeting of Hanover County. At a meeting on 9 May 1767, members . . . — Map (db m9213) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Guinea — A Staggering Blow
We had confidence in him that knew no bounds...his loss was irreparable. Wills Lee, Richmond Howitzers News of Stonewall Jackson's death stunned the South. "A greater sense of loss and deeper grief never followed the death of mortal . . . — Map (db m3310) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Guinea — Fairfield Plantation
The farm office across the lawn is all that remains of the once-sprawling plantation called “Fairfield.” Thomas Coleman Chandler purchased Fairfield Plantation in 1845. For the next 17 years it prospered and evolved – largely at . . . — Map (db m5604) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Guinea — Guinea StationGrant Maneuvers South
Lee vs. Grant – The 1864 Campaign General Winfield Hancock’s Union Second corps left Spotsylvania Court House after sunset on May 290, 1864. It trudged south along dark roads, headed toward Milford Station on the Richmond, . . . — Map (db m3308) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Guinea — Stonewall Jackson Died
Stonewall Jackson Died May 10, 1862 Buried Lexington, Va. — Map (db m13937) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Guinea — War Comes to Fairfield
War brought profound changes to the Chandler family, Fairfield, and the slaves who toiled on the plantation. Three of Thomas Chandler’s sons enlisted in the Confederate army. When the Union army occupied Fredericksburg in 1862 many of Chandler’s . . . — Map (db m3313) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Hanover — Z-148 — Caroline County / Hanover County
(Obverse) Caroline County Area 529 Square Miles Formed in 1727 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William. Named for Queen Caroline, wife of King George II. George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest, passed his youth in this . . . — Map (db m22269) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Hanover — E-115 — Gabriel’s Rebellion
On 24 Aug. 1800, slave Ben Woolfolk met with other slaves at nearby Littlepage’s Bridge to recruit individuals for an insurrection planned for 30 Aug. The insurgents led by Gabriel, a slave owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Henrico County, intended . . . — Map (db m5611) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Ladysmith — E-99 — Clark Family Farm
In 1754, John and Ann Rogers Clark, with their sons Jonathan and George Rogers, moved from Albemarle County to a farm four miles west. There were born Ann, John, Richard, Edmund, Lucy, Elizabeth, William and Frances. During the Revolutionary War, . . . — Map (db m9215) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Ladysmith — E-26 — Dickinson's Mill
Lee camped here, on May 21, 1864, on his way to the North Anna to oppose Grant moving southward. Ewell's and Longstreet's corps rested here that night. — Map (db m10648) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Ladysmith — E-27 — Maneuvering to the North Anna River
Unable to defeat Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederates during the Spotsylvania Courthouse battles 8-19 May 1864, Union commander Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's forces maneuvered east and south forcing Lee to abandon his entrenched position. The . . . — Map (db m9214) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Ladysmith — E 99-a — York: Lewis and Clark Expedition
Born in Caroline County in 1770, York was a slave of the William Clark family and the only African American on the 1803-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition. Approximately 34 years old at the time, York was one of the hunters and also accompanied groups . . . — Map (db m47378) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Milford — ND-5 — Edmund Pendleton's Home
Six miles southeast is the site of Edmundsbury, home of Edmund Pendleton. Pendleton, born September 9, 1721, was in the House of Burgesses; a delegate to the Continental Congress; chairman of the Virginia Committee of Safety, 1775-6; president of . . . — Map (db m22259) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Milford — ND-15 — Lt. Col. George Armistead (1780-1818)The War of 1812
Marker front Lt. Col. George Armistead (1780-1818) Known for his service in the War of 1812, George Armistead was born here at Newmarket plantation. Armistead distinguished himself in 1813 during the capture of Fort George, Canada, but . . . — Map (db m82167) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Milford — Milford StationLee Avoids A Trap — Lee vs. Grant – The 1864 Campaign
Unable to crack Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s strongly fortified lines at Spotsylvania Court House, Union Gen. Grant ordered Gen. Winfield Hancock’s Second Corps to cross the Mattaponi River here at Milford Station and threaten the Confederate . . . — Map (db m19285) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Moss Neck — N-13 — Skinker’s Neck
Two miles north on the Rappahannock River. There Jubal A. Early, in December, 1862, confronted Burnside’s army on the other side of the river. His alertness prevented a crossing and battle at this point. — Map (db m22576) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Moss Neck — N-8 — The Third Lederer Expedition
In 1669 and 1670, German-born John Lederer led three expeditions to explore Virginia’s Piedmont and the Carolinas that encouraged further European exploration. The third expedition began nearby at Robert Talifer’s house near the Rappahannock . . . — Map (db m22569) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Moss Neck — N-12 — Windsor
This is the ancient Woodford Estate. Governor Spotswood and the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe stopped here on their way to the mountains, August, 1716. Here General William Woodford was born, October 6, 1734. He defeated Governor Lord Dunmore at . . . — Map (db m22577) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Nancy Wrights Corner — E-28 — Nancy Wright’s
A little to the east, at Nancy Wright's, Warren's (Fifth) and Wright's (Sixth) Corps, coming from the east, on May 22, 1864, turned south. Wright camped here on May 22. — Map (db m3318) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — Assassin's End
This is the site of Locust Hill, Richard Henry Garrett's farm. Early on the morning of 26 April 1865, a 16th New York Cavalry detachment cornered John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his co-conspirator, John E. Harold, . . . — Map (db m92832) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Dorothy RoyOne of America's Earliest Business Women
The daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Buckner and the widow of Charles Smith, Dorothy Smith married John Roy in 1719. John Roy was the owner of a tobacco warehouse at Port Royal, Virginia - a facility to which local planters brought their tobacco to . . . — Map (db m57538) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Z-164 — Essex County / Caroline CountyArea 258 Square Miles / Area 529 Square Miles
Essex County. Area 258 square miles. Formed in 1691 from Old Rappahannock County, and named for Essex County, England. R.M.T. Hunter, United States Senator and Confederate Secretary of State, lived in this county. Caroline County. Area . . . — Map (db m7302) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — N-14 — Hazelwood
Here was the home of John Taylor of Caroline, Jefferson’s chief political lieutenant and leading advocate of states rights. He died here in 1824. — Map (db m22582) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — John Wilkes Booth
This is the Garrett place, where John Wilkes Booth, assassin of Lincoln, was cornered by Union soldiers and killed, April 26, 1865. The house stood a short distance from this spot. — Map (db m1584) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — N-17 — Old Port Royal
The town was established in 1744 and was one of the principal shipping points on the Rappahannock River in colonial times. In December, 1862, Burnside, commanding the Army of the Potomac, considered crossing the river here but finally moved up to . . . — Map (db m21457) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Port RoyalBooth Turned Away — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin
In front of you is the Brockenbrough-Peyton House where fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David Herold accompanied by three former Confederate soldiers arrived about 2:30 pm April 24, 1865, 10 days after Booth shot Lincoln. The owner, Randolph . . . — Map (db m4525) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Port RoyalUnion Supply Depot
Port Royal possessed the finest harbor on the middle reaches of the Rappahannock River. Although the town's permanent wharf had been destroyed by Union gunboats before the Battle of Fredericksburg, the excellent harbor made Port Royal an obvious . . . — Map (db m57537) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Port Royal Harbor
This site represents an important part of the heritage and development of Caroline County. After the chartering of the town of Port Royal in 1744, this excellent harbor served the large tobacco trade between local plantations and London. A warehouse . . . — Map (db m22248) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — The Earliest Inhabitants: Native Americans
Based on artifacts excavated in and around Port Royal, archaeologists estimate that the area was inhabited as early as 11,000 years ago. At the time the English arrived, the area was occupied by tribes united in a confederacy ruled by Powhatan. The . . . — Map (db m57545) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — The Fox Tavern: A Colonial Landmark
Until the coming of the railroads in the 19th century, the Rappahannock River town of Port Royal was the commercial center of what is now Caroline County, Virginia. Like many ports, it was a raucous place and boasted a disproportionate number of . . . — Map (db m57543) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — The Sacred Lot
On this lot in 1820 the first church to be constructed in the Town of Port Royal was built. The brick building had 12 windows and was inter-denominational. By 1844 it was known as the Methodist Church, even though ministers of other denominations . . . — Map (db m57503) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — N-16 — Where Booth Died
On this road two miles south is the Garrett place. There John Wilkes Booth, Lincoln's assassin, was found by Union cavalry and killed while resisting arrest, April 26, 1865. — Map (db m22246) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Rappahannock Academy — N-15 — Rappahannock Academy
On this site stood colonial Mount Church, built about 1750. In 1808 the parish glebe was sold and the proceeds were used to establish a school; the church building was turned into Rappahannock Academy, one of the most noted schools in Virginia. — Map (db m22578) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Woodford — Bethel ChurchUnion Command Meets
Lee vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign "At the church…the 9th Corps was marching past, and Burnside was sitting, like a comfortable abbot, in one of the pews, surrounded by his buckish staff whose appearance is the reverse of clerical.” . . . — Map (db m4760) HM

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