Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Hanover County Virginia Historical Markers

259 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 59
 
Marker along Route 1 image, Touch for more information
By Dawn Bowen, August 4, 2007
Marker along Route 1
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-16 — Ashland
In 1838, the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad bought 462 acres bordering its tracks twelve miles north of Richmond in Hanover County. The company created a small summer retreat and passenger rest stop there. In 1858, the area was . . . — Map (db m1991) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — AshlandThe War Years — Lee vs. Grant — The 1864 Campaign
Ashland in 1860 was a quiet, charming village. Its 150 residents lived in cottages on tree-lined streets. A fashionable hotel, a notable racecourse, and a famous mineral springs resort made Ashland a social center. Then came war. In the summer . . . — Map (db m8199) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-17 — Confederate March From the North Anna River
Following the Union army's departure from the North Anna River on 26 May 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee cautiously moved his army south toward Richmond to stay between the Federals and the capital. Lee's wagon trains, using nearby Ellett's . . . — Map (db m17788) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — Downtown Business Growth Fuels Ashland ExpansionAshland Museum Inside Out
Ashland's business district developed after the Civil War around the intersection of England and Thompson streets and Railroad Avenue. The train station was on the east side of the tracks north of England Street, with a passenger shed on the west . . . — Map (db m92677) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-119 — Early Stages of Stuart's Ride Around McClellan
Confederate Brig. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart with his 1,200 cavalrymen rode past this spot on the morning of 12 June 1862, heading west. On a mission to gather intelligence about Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac, Stuart hoped to . . . — Map (db m15837) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-15 — Henry at Hanover Courthouse
Six miles east still stands Hanover Courthouse, in which, December, 1763, Patrick Henry delivered his great speech in the "Parsons' Cause," when he denounced the British government for vetoing an act of the Virginia General Assembly. — Map (db m15849) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-14 — Jackson's March to Mechanicsville
In mid-June 1862, having defeated three Union armies in the Shenandoah Valley, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and his Valley Army joined Gen. Robert E. Lee to defend Richmond. Jackson and his men marched by here on 26 June to strike the . . . — Map (db m16168) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-22 — Lafayette and Cornwallis
The Marquis de Lafayette and his outnumbered colonial troops abandoned Richmond on 27 May 1781 to avoid Gen. Charles Cornwallis's approaching forces. Lafayette marched north from Richmond through Hanover County and likely crossed the nearby North . . . — Map (db m9212) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — M60 Main Battle TankPatton Series
The Patton series of tanks are named after General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. Third Army during WWII, and one of the first American advocates for the use of tanks in battle. The M60 Patton battle tank entered active duty . . . — Map (db m79750) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — Railroad Company Sees Potential For A Town Among The Slash PinesAshland Museum Inside Out
Railroad transportation was still new in 1836 when the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac (RF&P) Railroad Company completed a single track from Richmond to a sawmill 20 miles north in rural Hanover County. At the same time, the RF&P purchased a . . . — Map (db m92674) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — I-10A — Randolph-Macon College
Three blocks west is Randolph-Macon College for men, oldest permanent Methodist college in America. Chartered in 1830 and named for John Randolph and Nathaniel Macon. Originally located at Boydton in Mecklenburg County, it was moved here in 1868. — Map (db m1992) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — I-10a — Randolph-Macon College
Chartered in 1830 in Boydton, this institution is the oldest Methodist-affiliated college in continuous operation in the United States. It is named for statesmen John Randolph of Virginia and Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. The college was moved . . . — Map (db m8213) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — I-10b — Randolph-Macon College
Chartered in 1830 in Boydton, this institution is the oldest Methodist-affiliated college in continuous operation in the United States. It is named for statesmen John Randolph of Virginia and Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. The college was moved . . . — Map (db m8214) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-142 — School Transportation
Virginia public school boards began providing transportation to white students early in the 20th century but frequently denied this service to African Americans. Black children often had to walk miles to school, leading to nonattendance. Across . . . — Map (db m102774) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-105 — Slash Church
Erected in 1729-32 as the Upper Church of Saint Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Slash Church's location next to swampy woods (a "slash" in 18th-century terms) gave it its name. The Reverend Patrick Henry, uncle of the famous patriot, served as rector . . . — Map (db m16167) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-122 — Stuart Turns North
Late in the morning of 12 June 1862, Confederate Brig. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart and 1,200 cavalrymen reached this intersection on a mission to gather intelligence about Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac. Here Stuart's column . . . — Map (db m15842) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-74 — Stuart's Ride Around McClellan
Near here, on Winston's Farm, J. E. B. Stuart, advancing north, camped on June 12, 1862. Stuart was scouting to find the position of the right wing of McClellan's army besieging Richmond. At this point he turned east to Hanover Courthouse. Stuart . . . — Map (db m15834) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — E-121 — Stuart's Riders Skirt Ashland
On the afternoon of 12 June 1862, Confederate Brig. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's column passed here on a mission to gather intelligence about Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac. Riding northeast toward the Richmond, Fredericksburg, . . . — Map (db m15881) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Ashland — Town Of Ashland Historic DistrictAshland Museum Inside Out
The Town of Ashland has two historic districts: the Randolph-Macon College Historic Campus that was made a district in 1979 and the larger Ashland Historic District established in 1983. The Randolph-Macon College Historic Campus encompasses . . . — Map (db m92675) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Asland — E-120 — Stuart's Ride Around McClellan Begins
Here at Elmont (known as Kilby's Station during the Civil War), Confederate Brig. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart assembled the last of his 1,200 cavalrymen and began his ride around Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac on 12 June 1862. . . . — Map (db m15840) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Atlee — ND-11 — Lee’s Headquarters
Just to the east stood the Clarke house (Lockwood), wherein Gen. Robert E. Lee made his field headquarters, 28-31 May 1864. While here, and though ill, Lee deployed troops to key positions in Hanover County, including Haw's Shop, Totopotomoy Creek, . . . — Map (db m15753) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Atlee — 50 — Totopotomoy LineConfederate Works
Fortifications on this hill mark the strong confederate works along Totopotomoy Creek, prepared as a defensive position in General Lee’s withdrawal from the Rapidan to the James. Engagements here May 29-30, 1864, were preliminary to the Second . . . — Map (db m14259) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Atlee — 51 — Totopotomoy LineFederal Works
Crossing the road at this point were Federal entrenchments heavily shelled by the Confederates in the operation of May 29-30, 1864, immediately preceding the Second Battle of Cold Harbor. The nearby Shelton House was mentioned frequently in . . . — Map (db m14261) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Atllee — ND-4 — Patrick Henry's Birthplace
Seven miles east, at Studley, May 29, 1736, was born Patrick Henry, the Orator of the Revolution. — Map (db m73943) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Beaverdam — Beaver Dam School
The original Beaver Dam School was built in 1909 on land acquired by the School Board of Beaver Dam District No. 3 of Hanover County. On 16 Dec 1919, fire destroyed the original two-story frame building that housed both elementary and high school . . . — Map (db m80002) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Beaverdam — W-214 — Scotchtown
A mile north is Scotchtown, Patrick Henry's Home, 1771-1777. Dolly Madison, President James Madison's wife, lived here in her girlhood. Layfayette was here in May, 1781, retreating northward before Cornwallis. Cornwallis passed here in June, 1781, . . . — Map (db m21924) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Beaverdam — 7 — ScotchtownWelcome to Scotchtown
Scotchtown is best known as the site from which Patrick Henry rode to Richmond in March of 1775 to deliver his infamous “Liberty or Death” speech. . Some have even suggested that the house, where he had been forced to confine his wife . . . — Map (db m47453) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Beaverdam — ND-8 — The Depot at Beaver Dam
The first railroad depot at Beaver Dam was built ca. 1840 to serve the farmers of Hanover and Louisa counties. Its strategic location during the Civil War made it a target of many Union raids. The July 20, 1862, raid saw the depot burned and Colonel . . . — Map (db m5186) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-6 — "Come on to Richmond"May 24, 1864 6:00pm — Gray Trail
Despite the disaster that had befallen the 35th Massachusetts, General Ledlie became even more determined to secure Ox Ford. Against the orders of his division commander, the drunken general ordered his unsupported brigade to assault the Confederate . . . — Map (db m20957) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-7 — "Save yourselves if you can"May 24, 1864 6:00 - 7:00pm — Gray Trail
As the imperiled Union brigade huddled in the ravine before you, General Mahone recognized that their bold assault was unsupported and ordered General Harris to send a regiment from these trenches to attack them. At 6:45 p.m. the 12th Mississippi . . . — Map (db m20959) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-6 — A Night of AgonyMay 24, 1864 — Blue Trail
A field hospital was set up beside the river where the wounded were given what little care could be provided in the darkness and rain. The waters of the North Anna were now too high to carry the men to safety, so the Federal soldiers settled . . . — Map (db m75005) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — ACE Roller Coaster Landmark
The American Coaster Enthusiasts recognize Rebel Yell as an ACE Roller Coaster Landmark, a designation reserved for rides of historic significance. Designed by John C. Allen (1907-1979) of the Philadelphia Toboggan Company, the 92-foot high . . . — Map (db m19072) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-10 — Artillery DuelMay 25 - 26, 1864 — Gray Trail
You are standing before the trench line of the 10th Georgia Battalion, which held the right flank of Wright’s brigade. The Florida brigade and Lane’s artillery battalion held the position across the ravine to your right. On May 25 and 26 cannon and . . . — Map (db m20971) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — EA-4 — Attack at Ox Ford24 May 1864
A half mile north, a brigade of Union infantry commanded by Brig. Gen. James H. Ledlie struck the center of Lee’s army, which blocked Grant’s approach to Richmond. Formidable earthworks hastily erected by Brig. Gen. William H. Mahone’s division . . . — Map (db m21054) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-3 — Battle on the Skirmish LineMay 24, 1864 2:00pm - 4:00pm — Gray Trail
Grant misinterpreted Lee’s withdrawal on May 23 and 24 as Confederate weakness and ordered the Army of the Potomac to brush aside any scattered Rebel resistance and advance to Richmond. Major General Ambrose E. Burnside received orders to move his . . . — Map (db m20953) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Boo Boo's Tree Swings
Opened May, 1975 This "Kiddie Chair Carousel" (as named by the manufacturer Intamin AG of Switzerland) has also operated under names "Totem-Go-Round" and "Hickory Limbs" since its opening debut. A concrete "tree" surrounds the original ride . . . — Map (db m22726) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Boulder Bumpers
Opened May, 1975 The Boulder Bumpers is a miniature version of the Dodgem car ride in Candy Apple Grove. It features two-rider cars, built by Bertazzon of Italy, that run on a 59' x 30' steel-plated floor. the ride structure is painted concrete . . . — Map (db m22700) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — E-111 — Church Quarter
The two-room log house, a rare survivor of a once-common house type, was built about 1843 probably by Sarah Thornton, whose father-in-law John Thornton acquired the property in 1790. On 16 July 1862, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and his . . . — Map (db m21921) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-2 — Colonel Weisiger's VirginiansMay 24, 1864 1:00pm - 4:00pm — Gray Trail
The five Virginia regiments led by Colonel David A. Weisiger began construction of the trenches before you on the morning of May 24 and continued to work on them during the next two days. The Virginians had been resting quietly near Anderson’s . . . — Map (db m74893) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Dead of the North Anna Battlefield
This monument honors all the valiant men who lost their lives on the battlefields of the North Anna May 23-26, 1864 “No more shall the war cry sever, or the winding rivers be red; They banish our anger forever when they laurel the graves of . . . — Map (db m15167) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-12 — Dig and Dig Some MoreMay 25-26, 1864 — Blue Trail
The earthworks before you form a unique pattern known as the “V’s”. At first glance, the trenches seem to be without pattern or purpose but they tell the story of the Union defense of the area on May 24-27. The line of trenches on the . . . — Map (db m75011) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — E-5 — Fork Church
Fork Church was first housed in a 1722 frame building near the present church site. It was known as "The Chapel in the Forks" and derived its name from the nearby confluence of the North and South Anna rivers and the Little and Newfound rivers. The . . . — Map (db m21922) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Hanover JunctionCritical Intersection — Lee vs. Grant — The 1864 Campaign
This junction was one of the most pivotal sites for the well-being of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s army. Known during the war as Hanover Junction, it was the intersection of two important railroads. The Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac . . . — Map (db m3748) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — E-21 — Hanover Junction
Two 19th-century railroads crossed at grade level just east: the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac and the Virginia Central, which ran west to the Shenandoah Valley, the Confederacy’s breadbasket during the Civil War. This junction attained . . . — Map (db m14864) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-5 — Ledlie's LegacyMay 24, 1864 — Blue Trail
Ledlie’s men reached safety after uniting with Colonel Elisha Gaylord Marshall's 9th Corps Provisional brigade. Marshall was a tough West Point graduate who fought on the western frontier and was severely wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg. Ln . . . — Map (db m75004) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-2 — Like the Coming of a CycloneMay 24, 6:00-6:30 pm — Blue Trail
The fighting pits before you mark the positions of the skirmishers of the 2nd Georgia Battalion of General Ambrose Wright’s Brigade, defending Ox Ford. The Georgians were in a perfect position to fire into the flank of Ledlie’s . . . — Map (db m74895) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-1 — Men from MassachusettsMay 24, 1864, 6:45pm — Blue Trail
The crack of thunder and flash of lightning echoed across the ravine before you, as the men of Ledlie’s Brigade struggled to survive the relentless Confederate rifle and cannon fire which targeted them with fatal precision. The low . . . — Map (db m74894) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — North Anna River
General R.E. Lee commanding the Army of Northern Virginia crossed here 22d May 1864 and checked the Army of the Potomac commanded by General U.S. Grant "A crisis in the War Between the States" — Map (db m80003) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — EA-1 — North Anna River Campaign21-26 May 1864
Approaching Richmond from the north after the Wilderness Campaign, Lt. General U.S. Grant sought to cross the North Anna River and capture the critical rail center at Hanover Junction (Doswell). General R. E. Lee ordered the construction of a . . . — Map (db m14867) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-4 — One Brigade AloneMay 24, 1864 3:00pm - 4:00pm — Gray Trail
The first unit of the Union Ninth Corps to cross the North Anna was Brigadier General James H. Ledlie’s brigade. His 1,500 infantrymen were ready to advance by 3:00 p.m., despite having been soaked up to their armpits while crossing the river. . . . — Map (db m20955) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-9 — One More River to CrossMay 24 - 26, 1864 — Gray Trail
From the gun pits served by McIntosh’s artillery battalion, you can easily see the natural strength of the Confederate position. The repulse of Ledlie’s brigade served as a warning to Grant that Lee was still on the North Anna in great strength and . . . — Map (db m20967) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Ranger Smith's Jeep Tour
Opened May, 1975 Operating 25 years in the same corner of what was originally called "The Happy Land of Hanna-Barbera", this popular children's jeep ride was manufactured by Intamin AG of Switzerland. This "Kiddie Merry Hunting" ride cost about . . . — Map (db m22724) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-3 — Run for SafetyMay 24, 1864 6:45 pm - 7:30 pm — Blue Trail
The melee resulting from the combination of a pouring thunderstorm, the boiling mix of five regiments of Union soldiers pursued by three regiments of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia infantrymen - accented by the flashes and smoke of . . . — Map (db m74896) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Blue Ridge TollwayOpened May, 1975
Built near a wooded section of the park once known as Shady Grove, guests could walk through the woods and watch these ⅘ scale replicas of classic automobiles. The cars are modeled after 1917 Model T Fords. The top speed is about 6 . . . — Map (db m20886) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The CarrouselKings Dominion — Opened May, 1975
Manufactured by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company, "No. 44" first opened in 1917 at Riverside park in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1938 the ride was sold to Roger Williams Park in Providence, Rhode Island, then came to Kings Dominion in 1973 . . . — Map (db m19074) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Eiffel Tower
Opened May, 1975 Standing on concrete footers extending sixteen feet below ground, the Eiffel Towers is 331'-6" tall, weighs about 800 tones and is a 1/3 replica of the original. The top observation platform is 275 feet high, and offers a . . . — Map (db m21832) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Fight for North Anna / The North Anna Battlefield
(west side of Marker): The Fight for North Anna On May 21, 1864, Union General Ulysses S. Grant directed the Army of the Potomac away from Spotsylvania Court House in a turning movement toward Hanover Junction, today known as Doswell. . . . — Map (db m15164) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-5 — The Heart of DixieMay 24, 1864 3:45pm — Gray Trail
The trenches before you were manned by the soldiers of Brigadier General Nathaniel Harris’ brigade of Mississippians, who had deployed just to the right of Sanders’ Alabamians by 1:00 p.m. on the 24th. The small pits behind the trench line served as . . . — Map (db m20956) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-8 — The Inverted VMay 23, 1864 6:45pm — Gray Trail
You are now standing in the tip of the famous “inverted V” position constructed by Lee’s army along the North Anna River. The trenches on your left continued to the Little River, while those on the right anchored on a bend in the North . . . — Map (db m20961) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Stop-1 — The Ox Ford RoadMay 23, 1864 11:00am - 8:00pm — Gray Trail
At 11:00 a.m. six cannon of Major John Lane’s Georgia artillery battalion, followed closely by Brigadier General Edward A. Perry’s weakened 270-man Florida infantry brigade, moved down this road to cover the vital crossing of Ox Ford. As the Union . . . — Map (db m20946) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Scooby-Doo Ghoster Coaster
The Scooby-Doo Ghoster Coaster opened in 1974 with Lion Country Safari, making it the first ride to operate at Kings Dominion. The figure 8 layout is patterned after a similar coaster that once ran at Cincinnati's Old Coney amusement park. The . . . — Map (db m86390) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Shenandoah Lumber Company
Patterned after the old flumes built to transport lumber out of the west coast mountains at the turn of the century, this is a classic log flume designed and manufactured for family fun. Water flows through the trough at 3,500 gallons per . . . — Map (db m10776) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Shockwave
The second stand-up roller coaster built in the United States, and the first introduced on the east coast. The ride features 2,210 feet of track & a lift hill 93 feet tall. The ride was repainted in 2000 to celebrate our 25th anniversary. . . . — Map (db m10754) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — The Wave Swinger
Opened May, 1975 Built by Zierer, The Wave Swinger is named for its wave-like motion, creating a thrilling experience for guests of all ages. Note the craftmanship of the original oil paintings on the center column and top crown, cleaned and . . . — Map (db m21836) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Turning Lee’s FlankBattle of North Anna River — 1864 Overland Campaign
Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia arrived here at the North Anna River on May 22, 1864. The next day, the Union Army of the Potomac followed, having maneuvered around the Confederates from the Wilderness through Spotsylvania . . . — Map (db m73939) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — VolcanoThe Blast Coaster — Paramount's Kings Dominion
Volcano, The Blast Coaster was introduced in 1998, and in 2000 still reigns as the world's first and fastest suspended blast coaster. Riders are blasted 155 feet vertically through the mouth of an active volcano. Volcano, the Blast Coaster is . . . — Map (db m17796) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Doswell — Water Works
Water Works is 16 acres of wet family fun, offering a total of 28 water slides and attractions, and free with a paid admission to the park. "Hurricane Reef" first opened in 1992 with 20 water slides, then doubled its size in 1999 with the addition . . . — Map (db m20889) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Glen Allen — Z-193 — Hanover County / Henrico County
(Obverse) Hanover County Area 512 Square Miles Formed in 1720 from New Kent, and named for the electorate of Hanover. Patrick Henry and Henry Clay were born in this county. In it were fought the battles of Gaines's Mill, 1862, and . . . — Map (db m25366) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Glen Allen — John Preston Clarke
The Rev. John Preston Clarke (1831-1915), a free black man, and his Madagascar-born wife, Lucy Ann Renibe Winston, were raised in a Quaker community of free blacks in Montpelier. Ordained a minister in 1867, Clarke helped foster black institutions . . . — Map (db m93188) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-6 — Clay's Birthplace
Three miles northwest is Clay Spring, where Henry Clay was born, April 12, 1777. He passed most of his early life in Richmond, removing to Kentucky in 1797. His career as a public man and as a peacemaker between North and South is an important part . . . — Map (db m92712) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-9 — Cornwallis’s Route
Lord Cornwallis, marching northward in pursuit of Lafayette’s American force, camped near here, May 30, 1781. He entered this road from the east on his way from Hanover Town to the North Anna at Chesterfield Ford (Telegraph Bridge). — Map (db m1918) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Hanover Confederate Soldiers Monument
Hanover to her Confederate Soldiers and to her Noble Women who loved them 1861-1865 — Map (db m16228) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Hanover Court HouseErected in 1735
(Obverse) Near here lived in 1610 Machumps, brother-in-law to King Powhatan. Near here were born Patrick Henry and Henry Clay. In this building on 1st December 1763 Patrick Henry lighted the torch of liberty in the Parson’s . . . — Map (db m70490) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — 6 — Hanover Courthouse“Give me liberty or give me death!” — Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775
Hanover County was organized in 1720 and named for George I, King of England and former elector of Hanover in Germany. Seventeen years later (between 1737 and 1738), construction of the courthouse structure began and was completed in 1743. The . . . — Map (db m32691) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — 6 — Hanover Courthouse“Give me liberty or give me death!” — Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775
In December 1763, the Historic Hanover Courthouse was the site of the famous Parsons’ Cause, an opening salvo of the American Revolution. During the Parsons’ Cause trial, Patrick Henry voiced one of the first American objections to denial of the . . . — Map (db m32692) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Hanover TavernWar Comes to Hanover Courthouse
This community’s first real taste of war came in May 1862, when Gen. George B. McC1e11an’s Union army moved from the east to threaten Richmond. On May 25, McClellan ordered troops to reconnoiter the Hanover Courthouse area and push back any enemy . . . — Map (db m15818) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — 5 — Hanover Tavern“Give me liberty or give me death!” — Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775
Hanover Tavern was an essential part of the county courthouse complex during the 18th and 19th centuries, serving as the center of social life. For people living on large farms and plantations, whose closest neighbors could live miles away, taverns . . . — Map (db m32693) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-14 — Hanover Tavern
John Shelton opened the first tavern at the permanent site of Hanover Courthouse about the 1750s. The current tavern’s earliest segment dates from about 1791. The tavern prospered with the establishment of the stage coach line until the railroad . . . — Map (db m62525) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Hanover Veterans Memorial
We honor all who served World War I Buchanan, Levy A. • Collins, Robert F. • Duke, William L. • Fleet, William A. • Gallamore, H. • Harper, George T. • Haynes, James A. • Jenkins, Edwin T. • Melton, Lawrence J. • Mills, Guss W. • . . . — Map (db m53811) WM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-12 — Janie Porter Barrett(9 Aug. 1865-27 Aug. 1948)
Janie Porter Barrett was born in Athens, Ga. She graduated from Hampton Institute and soon began teaching home-management techniques to other young African American women and girls. In 1915, Barrett founded the Industrial School for Wayward Colored . . . — Map (db m22272) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-13 — John Henry Smyth
(14 July 1844–5 Sept. 1908) Born in Richmond, Va., to a free black mother and enslaved father, John Henry Smyth graduated from Howard University Law School in Washington, D.C., in 1872 and worked variously as a teacher, bank cashier, . . . — Map (db m1917) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — ND-3 — Newmarket
Newmarket stood on the Little River near Verdon in northern Hanover County until 1987, when to preserve it Robert W. Cabaniss moved it to this site. The seat of the Doswell family for whom the town of Doswell was named, the house is the sole . . . — Map (db m15852) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Patrick HenryMay 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799
Born at Studley Plantation six miles east of here was licensed to practice law on April 15, 1760. His awe-inspiring power as an orator was first recognized here at Hanover County Courthouse in his charge to the petit jury on December 1, 1766, in the . . . — Map (db m32682) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — The Colonial River Road
(side 1) The Colonial River Road After centuries of use by native people and the colonists of New Kent County, the road along the Pamunkey River was extended past the tobacco ports of Newcastle and Page’s Warehouse (later . . . — Map (db m53801) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Washington-Rochambeau Route
General Washington and General Rochambeau passed her on Sept. 13, 1781 on their way to victory at Yorktown. One mile south, they turned east on state rout 605. The marking of this route is a gift from the French Government. Committee of the . . . — Map (db m70489) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — "Liberty Hall"
Site of the home of Samuel Merdith, Sr., Gent. (1689-1762) Processioner-1708 St. Pauls Parish, Hanover Co. A grandson of Thomas Meredith, Sr. Emigrant in 1636, Virginia His land grant in 1661 — Map (db m70460) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — “The Old Church”Erected on this spot in 1753
Established originally on the Pamunkey River prior to 1684 Subsequently moved to the village of “Old Church” and rebuilt in 1718 The Rev. Patrick Henry officiated 1737-1777 — Map (db m15886) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 11th Mississippi Monument
(front) 11th Mississippi Infantry Regiment Law's Brigade Hood’s Division Jackson’s Corps Lee's Army of Northern Virginia C.S.A. Dedicated 2016 In their honor The men who carried this position were soldiers . . . — Map (db m97264) HM WM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 2nd Connecticut Volunteer Heavy ArtilleryConnecticut Remembers Her Fallen Sons
Late on the afternoon of June 1, 1864, Col. Elisha Strong Kellogg and his 2nd Connecticut Volunteer Heavy Artillery attacked Confederate entrenchments to the west along with other Federal troops from the Sixth and the Eighteenth Corps. Kellogg . . . — Map (db m15228) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 36th Wisconsin
(Front):This monument has been erected by one of their comrades Charles A. Storke in memory of the members of Companies B, E, F and G of the Thirty Sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. who here fought on the first day of June 1864. (East . . . — Map (db m15901) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Bloody Baptism of Fire
“It was the work of almost a single minute. The air was filled with sulphurous smoke, and the shrieks and howls of more than two hundred and fifty mangled men rose above the yells of triumphant rebels and the roar of their . . . — Map (db m40247) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Captured Trench
On the morning of June 1, 1864, Confederate soldiers of Thomas Clingman’s North Carolina brigade frantically dug this trench. They anticipated a Union assault later in the day. Around 6:00 p.m. Federal troops of the VI Corps moved into position near . . . — Map (db m16883) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Deadly Delay
The Union assaults of June 3 failed on nearly all fronts. For the next three days, while Federal wounded lay untended between the lines, Generals U. S. Grant and R. E. Lee struggled over the details of a truce. On June 7, more than 100 hours after . . . — Map (db m16886) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Dreadful HarvestCold Harbor Battlefield Park Walking Trail
The grim drama at Cold Harbor cost some 13,000 Federals and nearly 5,0000 Confederates killed, wounded, or captured. Southern morale soared after the battle, while Grant’s men were embittered by the lopsided defeat. One Union officer wrote that it . . . — Map (db m16188) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Lethal Occupation
From this advanced Confederate line, constructed after the grand Union assault of June 3, Lee’s sharpshooters searched for targets. They were near enough to the Federal line that enemy voices could be heard. Between June 3 and June 12 constant . . . — Map (db m16887) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Powerful Postion
General Porter held an impressive defensive position above Boatswain’s Creek. The first line of battle stood at the base of the hill to your front. The second line was posted nearby, and the third was along the crest behind you, where most of the . . . — Map (db m16393) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — A Well Preserved Union Artillery Position
You are standing in front of a Union artillery battery, located on a commanding hill about 400 yards behind the front lines. From here Union officers watched for activity along the Confederate lines, and opened fire with a barrage of shells whenever . . . — Map (db m16196) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Attacking the High GroundRichmond National Battlefield Park
Totopotomy Creek separated the armies here between May 29 and 31, 1864. Twice the men of the Union 2nd Corps (Barlow's Division) charged down this slope. They hoped to cross the "deep morass" and seize the opposite heights. Darkness halted the first . . . — Map (db m79239) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Balloons Over the Battlefield
“The view I had of the field of battle from the balloon for the first time that afternoon showed me how serious it was…..I was up half an hour in all, when I saw certain movements of our forces which made me hurry down and gallop up to . . . — Map (db m34897) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-12 — Battle Of Bethesda Church
Here stood Bethesda Church, founded about 1830 and used by Baptists and Disciples of Christ until it burned in 1868. In May 1864, during the Civil War, Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren's V Corps formed the left flank of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's . . . — Map (db m15672) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 25 — Battle of Cold HarborPosition of the Federal Sixth Corps
Advancing on June 1, 1864 from Old Cold Harbor, the Federal Sixth Corps occupied this and adjacent positions from which on June 3 the Army of the Potomac delivered repeated assaults against the main Confederate defences, which were approximately 400 . . . — Map (db m14231) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 26 — Battle of Cold HarborThe Field of the Heaviest Losses
This was approximately the farthest point gained and held by the Federals in their assaults of June 3, 1864 on the Confederate main line, 130 yards to the west. The heaviest losses sustained by the Federals were along and on either side of this road. — Map (db m14232) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 27 — Battle of Cold HarborThe Confederate Main Line
Here Longstreet’s Corps, with Breckinridge and A.P. Hill’s Corps to the southward, repulsed on June 3, 1864, fourteen assaults from the East against the confederate main line. The federal losses, about 7000, were the heaviest ever sustained in . . . — Map (db m14234) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 28 — Battle of Cold HarborMain Line of Anderson’s Left Wing
The Confederate earthworks here crossing this road were occupied May 31 – June 12, 1864, by the Left Division “Fields” of the First Corps. Then commanded by R.H. Anderson. Heavily attacked on June 3, this part of the line was held . . . — Map (db m14235) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 29 — Battle of Cold HarborPosition of the Confederate Left Wing
On the main Confederate line, eight miles long, which here crossed the Old Church Road, the Federal Army, June 3, 1864, made numerous futile and costly charges. The heaviest of these were three miles southeastward and were accounted “the worst . . . — Map (db m14236) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — E-130 — Battle of Cold HarborFlag of Truce
On 5 June 1864, two hot days after Gen. Robert E. Lee's bloody repulse of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's frontal assault, Federal Lt. Col. Theodore Lyman met Confederate Maj. Thomas J. Wooten nearby on Cold Harbor Road to initiate written communication on . . . — Map (db m15667) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-11 — Battle of Cold Harbor
The left of Lee's line at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864, crossed the road here. The main battle took place to the east, where Grant attacked Lee's trenches without success. — Map (db m15670) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Battle of Gaines' Mill
“The most terrific fire I ever witnessed, except at Gettysburg.” Col. Eppa Hunton, 8th Virginia Infantry “It was one continued roar of cannons & musketry you could not hear yourself think. Such desperate fighting . . . — Map (db m43319) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Battle of Totopotomoy CreekMay 30 - June 1, 1864
Fighting occurred here and elsewhere around the Polegreen Church as part of the Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, spanning three days from May 30 to June 1, 1864. This ground lay between the opposing lines, and witnessed the ebbs and flows of fierce and . . . — Map (db m69654) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Bayonets Are For Digging
This covered-way, constructed after June 3, connected the main Confederate line behind you to the low ground in front. A South Carolinian stationed near here recalled: To guard against the shells that were continually dropping in our midst . . . — Map (db m16891) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 3 — Beaver Dam Creek
Confederate troops pursuing Federals retreating eastward from Mechanicsville here came under heavy fire from across Beaver Dam Creek and were halted with loss in the late afternoon of June 26, 1862. — Map (db m14220) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Beaver Dam CreekRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Pk – 1862/64
General Robert E. Lee’s plan on June 26, 1862 did not anticipate a direct assault on the Union position here at Beaver Dam Creek. He hoped to maneuver instead of force to drive Fitz John Porter’s troops away from their powerful entrenchments. But . . . — Map (db m14983) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Beaver Dam Creek1862 Seven Days' Battles
(left panel) Visiting Richmond National Battlefield Park The concentration of Civil War resources found in the Richmond area is unparalleled. The National Park Service manages 13 sites, giving visitors an opportunity to examine the . . . — Map (db m37063) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Between the Lines
You are standing now just in front of the main section of Confederate fortifications. The primary line of Union entrenchments is 200 yards to your left. With the end of Grant’s attacks on the afternoon of June 3, the battle followed a less noisy but . . . — Map (db m15257) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-68 — Cavalry Action at Cold Harbor
On 31 May 1864, Brig. Gen. Wesley Merritt’s Union cavalry brigade, operating under Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, advanced along this road and through these fields. Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s Confederate horsemen fought a fluid defensive battle, . . . — Map (db m17558) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Cold Harbor1864 Overland Campaign
(left panel) Visiting Richmond National Battlefield Park The concentration of Civil War resources found in the Richmond area is unparalleled. The National Park Service manages 13 sites, giving visitors an opportunity to examine the . . . — Map (db m40246) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Cold Harbor BattlefieldRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Park – 1862/64
Here Grant and Lee, with combined armies numbering some 180,000 men, fought for two weeks in May and June of 1864. They came here directly after the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and North Anna River. Grant stretched his line to seven . . . — Map (db m15047) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Cold Harbor Battlefield Walking TrailHanover County Parks and Recreation
For thirteen days Union and Confederate armies faced each other around Cold Harbor, their lines separated by only 150 yards of ravaged ground. Twice, on June 1 and June 3 1864, savage fighting erupted when the Federals launched massive assaults . . . — Map (db m16214) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 30 — Cold Harbor CampaignAdvanced Position of Ewell's Corps
The second advanced position held by Ewell’s Confederate Corps here crossed the Old Church Road. This position was evacuated by the Confederates on the night of May 30, 1864. Occupied by the Federals on May 31 and attacked from the West by Southern . . . — Map (db m14237) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 31 — Cold Harbor CampaignAdvanced Position of Ewell's Corps
Across the Old Church road at this point ran the advanced line of about 700 yards held by part of Ewell’s Confederate Corps on May 30, 1864. Abandoned that night, the position was occupied May 31 by troops of the Fifth Federal corps. — Map (db m14238) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Cold Harbor: June 2, 1864Hanover County Parks and Recreation
This drawing (below) by the famous Civil-War artist, Alfred Waud, provides a rare glimpse of the Cold Harbor battlefield, sketched from this very spot on June 2, 1864. Union cannons blazed away at the Confederate lines only a half-mile in front of . . . — Map (db m15279) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Cold Harbor: The Early Actions
On May, 31, 1864, while the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia fought along Totopotomoy Creek, four miles to the north, Federal and Confederate cavalry gravitated toward the Old Cold Harbor crossroads. Following their victory . . . — Map (db m90838) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Confederate Breastworks
This remarkably preserved stretch of the main Confederate line saw little action. Although the land here was much less wooded in 1864, its occupants appreciated the partial shelter offered by the low ground. The soldiers took advantage of it to . . . — Map (db m16890) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Confederate Fortifications
The diary of Edward R. Crockett, 4th Texas Infantry, illustrates the daily pressure of life in these trenches: June 4th “We work hard last night & dawn on the 4th have a heavy work completed. We have quit sleeping almost . . . — Map (db m34613) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Confederate Grand Assault
“All was disorder and excitement; the field was full of men running for their very lives, and it was almost impossible to make any resistance to the tide of humanity pressing down upon us.” John E. Stewart, 44th New York . . . — Map (db m56493) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Confederate PositionCold Harbor - 1864
These earthworks are the center of the Confederate line – six miles of overlapping entrenchments. Taking advantage of the Union delay, the Confederates prepared defenses that swept every approach with cannon and rifle-musket. Across open . . . — Map (db m15230) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Confederate Pursuit
By nightfall Porter’s force had safely retreated across the Chickahominy. Lee had sustained nearly 9,000 casualties in his first victory of the war, while the Federals lost close to 6,000. “I could hear on all sides the dreadful groans of . . . — Map (db m15233) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-13 — Cornwallis's Route
Gen. Charles Cornwallis and his British forces left Petersburg on 24 May 1781 to attack the Marquis de Lafayette and his troops stationed in Richmond. Learning of Cornwallis's movements, Lafayette abandoned the city on 27 May and moved north through . . . — Map (db m22373) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Digging In
By the time the armies reached Cold Harbor soldiers on both sides were adept at building earthworks. The trenches before you are typical of the works that stretched for nearly seven miles and defined the fighting here at Cold Harbor. Union general . . . — Map (db m16207) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-24 — Edmund Ruffin's Grave
Here at Marlbourne is the grave of Edmund Ruffin (1794-1865), one of the leading American agriculturists of the 19th century. He published and edited the Farmer's Register, an agricultural journal, for several years. In 1843, Ruffin moved to . . . — Map (db m22364) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Eighth N. Y. Heavy ArtilleryCold Harbor
. . . — Map (db m16286) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 4 — Ellerson's Mill
From this main position above Ellerson's Mill, the Federal regulars who had stopped the Confederate advance of June 26, 1862 withdrew during the night, having discovered that "Stonewall" Jackson was turning their right flank. — Map (db m14198) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Federal Artillery BatteryCold Harbor Battlefield Park Walking Trail
Under the cover of night, Union artillerists left their horses at the foot of the hill behind you and dragged six rifled cannon up the slope by hand. The guns were then placed side by side inside this redoubt, with earthen mounds known as traverses, . . . — Map (db m16199) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Field HospitalGarthright House - 1864
During the Battle of Cold Harbor in June, 1864, the Union turned this middle-class plantation into a field hospital. The residents – forced to move to the basement – watched blood dripping down between the floorboards. After Grant left . . . — Map (db m15227) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Final Stand
Civil War artillery was a splendid defensive weapon, particularly when the battlefield landscape offered the gunners open fields of fire. At Gaines’ Mill the woods plagued the Union artillery. Several gaps in the trees however, offered a direct line . . . — Map (db m43334) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Firing Blind
The mounds seen here might be improvised mortar positions built by Confederate artillerists in June 1864. Normal cannon pits had fields of fire, often established by keeping the front parapet low or by building a platform on which the gun could sit. . . . — Map (db m79798) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — From Farmland to ForestCold Harbor Battlefield Park Walking Trail
Time has changed this landscape dramatically since the war. In 1864, much of the Co1d Harbor area was cleared farmland. One Federal believed this openness of the land was “the greatest part of the misery” at Cold Harbor. The deadly fire . . . — Map (db m16186) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 9 — Gaines' Mill
Near this spot stood the mill that gave its name to the battle of June 27, 1862 also called “First Cold Harbor”. About 1500 yards SSW was the home of Dr. Gaines, where the United States Army had its balloon station. — Map (db m14205) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Gaines' Mill1862 Seven Days' Battles
(left panel) Visiting Richmond National Battlefield Park The concentration of Civil War resources found in the Richmond area is unparalleled. The National Park Service manages 13 sites, giving visitors an opportunity to examine the . . . — Map (db m40249) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Gaines’ MillRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Pk – 1862/64
The action here on June 27, 1862, was the second-largest battle in American history up to that time. One day earlier General Robert E. Lee had pried the Union Fifth Corps from its position at Beaver Dam Creek. Here he brought 65,000 Confederate . . . — Map (db m15022) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Garthright House
"We charged across the open field under a murdrous storm of balls & canister shot...& soon gained complet[e] possesion of all the buildings....We soon fortified as best we could the aproaches to the house by barrells & farming tools & held the . . . — Map (db m34617) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Grant's Grand Assault
“We did not go far, only for six rods [100 feet]…soon…by the lively use of bayonets, frying-pans, tin plates, and cups, we had a temporary protection, and the satisfaction of holding practically all the ground we had been over.” . . . — Map (db m34615) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Z-147 — Hanover County / Henrico County
Hanover County Area 512 Square Miles Formed in 1720 from New Kent, and named for the Electorate of Hanover. Patrick Henry and Henry Clay were born in this county. In it were fought the battles of Gaines's Mill, 1862, and Cold Harbor, 1864. . . . — Map (db m15455) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-15 — Henry's Call to Arms
One mile east on the river was Newcastle. There, on May 2, 1775, Patrick Henry put himself at the head of the Hanover volunteers and marched against the royal governor, Lord Dunmore, who had seized the colony's powder. — Map (db m22374) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Historic Cold Harbor Road
In this location ran the original road from Mechanicsville to Cold Harbor. The bridge that crossed Beaver Dam Creek was destroyed by Union troops prior to the June 26, 1862, battle. — Map (db m15219) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — E-141 — Historic Polegreen Church
In 1747, the meetinghouse here became vital to the colonists' struggle for religious and civil liberty when Samuel Morris and other Hanover Presbyterian dissenters called the Rev. Samuel Davies (1723-1761) to become pastor. Davies, a great orator . . . — Map (db m15830) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Holding the High Ground
Today’s landscape makes it difficult to appreciate the many strengths of the Union position. The charging Confederates faced more obstacles than they could overcome: open fields, steep slopes, a broad and swampy creek, Union infantry using a . . . — Map (db m37065) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Hood's Attack
Fitz John Porter's troop had repulsed Confederate attacks throughout the afternoon. With daylight waning, Lee turned to John Bell Hood to spearhead the final assault. Personally leading the 4th Texas and the 18th Georgia, General Hood instructed his . . . — Map (db m16396) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — In Reserve
You are standing among entrenchments built by soldiers of the Union Eighteenth Corps less than ¼ mile from the front lines. At Cold Harbor regiments typically rotated out of the front lines every other day. This explains the many layers of reserve . . . — Map (db m16522) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Intensity of Battle
“By the time we had gotten across, the front line, broken by our fire, frightened … which sounded like forty thousand wild cats, had reached their second line, … confusion, and they, panicstricken, left their works and croded to the top of . . . — Map (db m43320) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — June 3, 1864 — 18th Corps: A Disastrous Attack
General John H. Martindale’s division of the 18th Corps deployed on this ground prior to its participation in the Federal attack on the morning of June 3, 1864. At 4:30 a.m., the roughly 3,400 men of the division advanced toward strong Confederate . . . — Map (db m90841) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Keep Digging
These trenches represent a dramatic change in battlefield tactics. When the two armies met on this ground in 1862, soldiers fought shoulder to shoulder; victory was often dependent upon the success or failure of a dramatic charge. By 1864 field . . . — Map (db m16882) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Keep Your Head Down
This shallow, winding depression is all that remains of a “zigzag” constructed by Union troops in June 1864. In trench warfare, soldiers dug ditches, called zigzags or covered-ways, to provide protection from sharpshooters as they moved . . . — Map (db m16881) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Keitt’s Attack — Morning, June 1, 1864
On the morning of June 1, General Lee was anxious to regain control of the Old Cold Harbor Crossroads and ordered two Confederate infantry divisions to attack the outnumbered Union cavalry troopers defending the intersection. Colonel Laurence M. . . . — Map (db m90842) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Killing Fields
“The men bent down as they pushed forward, as if trying … to breast a tempest, and the files of men went down like rows of blocks or bricks pushed over by striking against each other.” John L. Piper, 12th New Hampshire Infantry . . . — Map (db m34609) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Lee’s First Strike
The Confederate plan did not call for an attack against the Union position along Beaver Dam Creek. Instead, a series of manuevers would make the Union defenses here untenable. But poor communication and unexpected obstacles caused delays. Lee felt . . . — Map (db m40243) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Lee’s First Victory: At a Huge Cost
“Yesterday evening we was in one of the hardest fought battles ever known. I never had a clear conception of the horrors of war until last night….In going round that battlefield with a candle searching for friends I could hear on all sides . . . — Map (db m43335) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 2 — Mechanicsville
Near this village on June 26, 1862, Confederate troops under General R.E. Lee attacked and drove eastward the right wing of the Federal army commanded by Major-General George B. McClellan. This action began the Seven Days' Battle. — Map (db m14219) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Misery In The Trenches
The earthworks before you were home to Union soldiers for nearly two weeks during the fighting at Cold Harbor. One Federal officer described the suffering that these troops endured living and working in the trenches: “The work of intrenching . . . — Map (db m16208) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Mistaken Identity
“It was now sun down and the air was dense with smoke, so that we were realty not certain whether the column before us were friends or enemies….Their banner was furled, and we could not get any clue from that….Just at this time Colonel . . . — Map (db m16401) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Morell’s Division, USA
“The rebels rushed down the hill in line of battle, but it wasn’t quite so easy rushing across a swamp, waist deep in thick mud, and as they tried it we tried Sharp’s rifles at eight rods, firing as fast as we could put in cartridges, the . . . — Map (db m16398) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 6 — New Cold HarborWhere Two Battlefields Meet
Around this crossroads is bloody ground. To the right is the field of Gaines' Mill or First Cold Harbor, fought June 27, 1862, with 14,800 casualties. To the left is Second Cold Harbor, near which 17,00 fell, May 30 - June 12, 1864. — Map (db m14200) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Nowhere To Go
For nearly two weeks, from June 3 to June 12, the soldiers endured the agony of trench warfare. One Virginian recalled: Thousands of men cramped up in a narrow trench, unable to go out, or to get up, or to stretch or to stand, without danger . . . — Map (db m16895) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Pennsylvania MonumentCold Harbor
. . . — Map (db m16285) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Pickett’s Brigade, CSA
“As soon as this advancing brigade reached the summit of the hill it was met by a storm of shot and shell I never saw exceeded except in the famous charge of Pickett’s men at Gettysburg.” Col. Eppa Hunton 8th Virginia Infantry . . . — Map (db m16397) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 4 — Pine SlashWelcome to Pine Slash and the Honeymoon Cottage
Upon Patrick Henry’s marriage to Sarah Shelton in 1754, he received for her dowry a 300-acre tract of land and six slaves. Like many Virginians with small farms, Henry labored in the fields with his slaves. Much of the soil at Pine Slash had been . . . — Map (db m46754) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Polegreen ChurchStalemate at Totopotomoy Creek — Lee vs. Grant – The 1864 Campaign
Following the cavalry fight at Enon Church on May 28, 1864, Lee moved to block Grant’s advance toward Richmond. He stationed his army along a ridge protected by swampy Totopotomoy Creek. When Union infantry arrived they found Lee’s soldiers solidly . . . — Map (db m15829) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 2 — Polegreen ChurchReverend Samuel Davies and a young Patrick Henry
For more than a century the Polegreen Church stood as a monument to the Hanover Dissenters and Samuel Davies in the struggle for religious liberty. Though Davies died fifteen years before the American Revolution, his influence and revolutionary . . . — Map (db m32674) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 2 — Polegreen ChurchCradle of Religious Freedom in America
From Virginia’s founding until the American Revolution 170 years later, the Anglican Church was the only state recognized religion. The government built the churches and the parsonages and paid the clergy with tax money. All other religious groups . . . — Map (db m32679) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Powerful Position
On the morning of June 27, General Fitz John Porter’s men arranged their formidable defenses along the slope of Boatswain’s Creek, where you are standing. Orders directed him to resist Lee’s advance, “even to my destruction,” remembered . . . — Map (db m34900) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Preparation For Battle
On June 2, 1864, the night before the grand assault at Cold Harbor, Union staff officers passed among the battle lines issuing orders. One officer, Major Horace Porter, was in this vicinity when he witnessed a scene of foreboding. Porter recalled: . . . — Map (db m16195) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Read’s Battalion CSA ArtilleryRichmond National Battlefield Park
These cannon mark the approximate position of a four-gun battery belonging to the Richmond Fayette Artillery, part of Major J.P.W. Read’s Battalion that held strategic points along the Confederate main line. The battery supported General Alfred . . . — Map (db m15231) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Read's Batallion
These cannon mark the approximate position of a four-gun battery belonging to the Richmond Fayette Artillery, part of Major J.P.W. Read’s Battalion that held strategic points along the Confederate main line. The battery supported General Alfred H. . . . — Map (db m34050) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 3 — Rural Plains"Give me liberty or give me death!" — Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775
Rural Plains, home of the Shelton family for nearly three centuries, stands on the northern bank of Totopotomoy Creek. Eighteen-year-old Patrick Henry married Sarah Shelton in 1754. Family tradition places the wedding ceremony in the first floor . . . — Map (db m35014) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Rutland
Rutland was the home of the Timberlake family for 200 years, built circa 1790-1810 as a one-and-one-half-story hall-and-parlor house. July 12-21, 1862, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart headquartered in the house, with an encampment of 3,000 cavalry. . . . — Map (db m20972) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Scars of Conflict
Twelve days of combat transformed this once pastoral landscape. With every shift of a line of battle, the soldiers dug new works. Reserve troops dug too, well behind the front lines. By battle’s end, earthworks gouged the landscape in every . . . — Map (db m16200) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-4 — Seven Days BattlesMechanicsville
Down this slope in the late afternoon of June 26, 1862, A. P. Hill moved to attack the Unionists holding the east side of Beaver Dam Creek. Pender’s Brigade was on the left, Ripley’s on the right. Exposed to a terrible fire from entrenched troops, . . . — Map (db m14985) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-8 — Seven Days BattlesPorter’s Withdrawal
Along this road Fitz-John Porter withdrew from Beaver Dam Creek in the early morning of June 27, 1862. McClellan, having learned that Stonewall Jackson was approaching Porter’s rear, late at night ordered the withdrawal to another position. This was . . . — Map (db m14994) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-16 — Seven Days BattlesGaines’s Mill
This is the site of Gaines’s Mill, which gave its name to the Battle of June 27, 1862. Here A. P. Hill’s advance guard, following Porter, came in contact with the Union rearguard. After a short action the Unionists withdrew to a position on . . . — Map (db m14996) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-25 — Seven Days BattlesGaines’s Mill
Along the slopes of Boatswain Creek, facing north and west, extended Porter’s position in the afternoon of June 27, 1862. The line was held by Sykes’s division facing north, and Morell’s facing west. Later McCall was thrown in to assist Morell. At . . . — Map (db m15008) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-10 — Seven Days BattlesGaines’s Mill
Here Lee and Stonewall Jackson conferred in the morning of June 27, 1862. Jackson’s troops halted here until A. P. Hill arrived from Beaver Dam Creek. Hill then moved southward by Gaines’s Mill and Longstreet turned to the east. All three columns . . . — Map (db m15053) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-2 — Seven Days BattlesMechanicsville
Mechanicsville was held by Union outposts when, in the early afternoon of June 26, 1862, A. P. Hill reached it coming from the north. The Unionists were quickly driven back to their position on Beaver Dam Creek. Then D. H. Hill, followed by . . . — Map (db m15211) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-80 — Seven Days BattlesGaines’s Mill
On this hill, facing north, Sykes’s division was posted in the afternoon of June 27, 1862, holding the eastern end of the Union line. Here Jackson attacked, while to the west A. P. Hill and Longstreet renewed their assaults. When the Union line was . . . — Map (db m15225) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-60 — Seven Days BattlesGaines's Mill
Stonewall Jackson reached this point in the afternoon of June 27, 1862, after a circuit of Gaines's Mill. When he learned that A. P. Hill and Longstreet to the west were hard pressed, he moved south to join in the attack. — Map (db m15464) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-70 — Seven Days BattlesGaines's Mill
The hill to the south, part of the Union line, was assailed by Stonewall Jackson (with D. H. Hill) in the late afternoon of June 27, 1862, after A. P. Hill's and Longstreet's first assaults on the west had failed. Jackson's men carried the Union . . . — Map (db m16169) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-12 — Seven Days' BattlesNew Bridge
Leading up to and during the Seven Days' Battles from 25 June to 1 July 1862, bridges and roads played an important role in the movement of the Union and Confederate armies. New Bridge on the Chickahominy River was 1.5 miles south of here, and was . . . — Map (db m15675) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-9 — Seven Days' BattlesJackson's March to the Battlefields
Confederate Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and his troops passed through this intersection on 27 June 1862, having arrived from the Shenandoah Valley. Jackson's troops united with Gen. Robert E. Lee's forces just south of here at Walnut Grove . . . — Map (db m96723) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-23 — Seven Days' CampaignGaines's Mill
On 25 June 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee led his Army of Northern Virginia in the Seven Days' Campaign to drive Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan and his Army of the Potomac from the gates of Richmond. By 27 June the Union left flank rested atop Turkey Hill . . . — Map (db m15463) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-6 — Seven Days’ BattlesBattle of Beaver Dam Creek
The Civil War battle of Beaver Dam Creek (Mechanicsville) began on the afternoon of 26 June 1862. Confederate Maj. Gen. Ambrose P. Hill’s division crossed the Chickahominy upstream at Meadow Bridges and encountered Union skirmishers. The Federals . . . — Map (db m14988) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA-20 — Seven Days’ BattlesGaines’s Mill
Half a mile south is Boatswain Creek. The battle that was begun at Gaines’s Mill by A. P. Hill, following Porter’s rear guard, culminated at the Union position on Boatswain Creek. There A. P. Hill and Longstreet, moving eastward, and Jackson coming . . . — Map (db m14998) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Shelton House Under FireMay 30, 1864
Shelton House Under Fire May 30, 1864 (caption) For details about the scenes depicted in this image, please visit www.nps.gov/rich/sheltonhouse. — Map (db m84943) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O-8 — Sheridan's Raid
Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan from 9 to 14 May 1864 led three cavalry divisions on a raid around Richmond. His forces severed vital Confederate communication lines, destroyed railroad tracks, and captured stores and supplies. On 11 May . . . — Map (db m15214) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Site of Ellerson’s Mill
The foundation of the mill was located in the depression below the road bed. The millrace that supplied water to power the mill was built along the base of the hill and remnants can be seen today. The mill pond was located just beyond the modern . . . — Map (db m15220) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Site of PolegreenPresbyterian Church
Founded 1748 by Rev. Samuel Davies Presbytery of New Castle synod of New York. Seven years before the organization of Hanover Presbytery 1755 Destroyed June 1st 1864. Erected by Woman's Auxillary East Hanover . . . — Map (db m32681) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Springfield Plantation
In 1862 this farmhouse was home to the widow Sarah Watt, her granddaughter, Mary Jane Haw, and a maid. It was a typical Hanover County plantation of several hundred acres with some 28 slaves who produced a modest income from grains, potatoes, and . . . — Map (db m34618) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Stand Guard And Stay Awake
This well preserved rifle pit is one of many that extended across this hilltop and along the entire front. It marks the most advanced Federal position in this sector, only 50 yards from similar Confederate pits on the opposite crest. Soldiers . . . — Map (db m16885) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 1 — StudleyBirthplace of Patrick Henry
Only archaeological remnants of Studley survive today, but in the 18th century this was the site of an impressive two-story brick house. Studley was built by John Syme in the 1720s for his wife Sarah Winston. After his death, she married John Henry. . . . — Map (db m46775) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Texas
(front) Remembers the valor and devotion of its soldiers who participated in the battle of Gaines’ Mill, Virginia - June 27, 1862 Here, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee continued his attacks against Union Maj. Gen. George B. . . . — Map (db m55604) HM WM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Armies Gather at Cold HarborAfternoon — June 1, 1864
Following the Federal cavalry’s successful defense of the Old Cold Harbor Crossroads against Confederate infantry attacks on the morning of June 1, 1864, hard marching soldiers of the 6th Corps and 18th Corps arrived to solidify the Union army’s . . . — Map (db m90839) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Battle Begins
Porter’s soldiers rested their muskets across a make-shift breastwork of felled trees, bales of hay, and knapsacks. A Union soldier remembered “an ominous silence” that covered the battlefield moments before Lee launched his first . . . — Map (db m16392) HM

259 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 59
Paid Advertisement