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Barbour County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Skirmishing at Laurel Hill image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
Skirmishing at Laurel Hill
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Battle of Laurel HillTempest on the Turnpike
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Union and Confederate forces clashed along the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike (the narrow paved road in the foreground) on July 7-11, 1861. Union General Morris was ordered to "amuse" General Garnett at Laurel Hill - to make him believe the main attack . . . — Map (db m34439) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Belington
On Philippi Pike (U.S. 250) at Watkins Street (County Route 15), on the right when traveling north on Philippi Pike.
Union troops under Brigadier General T.A. Morris, advanced from Philippi on July 7, 1861 and established a fortified camp near this site. Battle of Belington took place July 7-11. Confederates were two miles to east at Laurel Hill. — Map (db m34424) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Laurel HillA Key to Victory — The First Campaign
On Philippi Pike (U.S. 250) at Watkins Street (County Route 15), on the right when traveling north on Philippi Pike.
On the nearby heights, Confederate General Robert Garnett's Army of Northwestern Virginia built fortifications to defend the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike in June 1861. Many received their baptism of fire here as Garnett's 4,000 Confederates skirmished . . . — Map (db m34423) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Laurel Hill
On Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Fortified camp occupied by Confederates under Brig. Gen. Robert S. Garnett. June 16 - July 12, 1861. The scene of sharp skirmishes July 7-11. Garnett retreated early in the morning of July 12 after the Rich Mountain defeat. — Map (db m34425) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — CannonsGrim Weapons of War
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Confederate artillery was posted here. The cannons were placed behind protective earthworks, still faintly visible today. Their fire swept the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike below. Model 1841 6-pounder field guns were used at Camp Laurel Hill. Although . . . — Map (db m34440) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
To honor all who served North and South April 12, 1861 to April 9, 1865 donated by Laurel Mountain Post 410 Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Belington, West Virginia March 1, 1999 — Map (db m34447) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War on the Beverly & Fairmont Turnpike
On Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
"A few dozen of us who had been swapping shots with the enemy's skirmishers, grew tired of the result less battle and by a common impulse - and I think without orders or officers, ran forward into the woods and attacked the Confederate works. We did . . . — Map (db m34456) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Confederate CemeteryFallen Heroes of Laurel Hill
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Within this fenced burial ground lie Confederate soldiers who died at Laurel Hill. Their number is unknown. Inscribed headboards once marked the graves. During the Civil War, disease killed more men than bullets. One soldier reported 14 graves in . . . — Map (db m34441) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Forced FlightConfederates Abandon Laurel Hill
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
By July 10, 1861, Federal cannons bombarded the interior of Camp Laurel Hill. Confederates may have sought shelter among the boulders nearby. On July 11, General Garnett learned of defeat at Rich Mountain. Fearful of being trapped, Garnett ordered a . . . — Map (db m34445) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Laurel Hill
On Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Battle of Laurel Hill, July 8, 1861, between Confederates and McClellan's army, followed by actions at Rich Mountain and Corrick's Ford, gave Federals control of State and established communication lines to the West. Fine view from peak. — Map (db m34426) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Laurel HillConfederate Encampment, 1861
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Soldiers of the Confederate Army of the Northwest occupied this ground from June 16 to July 11, 1861. Led by General Robert S. Garnett, a West Point instructor of tactics, they dug fortifications on the Mustoe farm to block the Beverly-Fairmont . . . — Map (db m34437) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Meadowville
On Morgantown Pike (State Highway 92) at Slate Road, on the right when traveling east on Morgantown Pike.
Meadowville, on the site of an Indian fort built in 1784, is a few miles north. New Jersey colonists settled there before 1800, and tavern, mills, and stores made it a trading center of the Tygarts Valley for a hundred years. — Map (db m34448) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Welcome to Camp Laurel HillGateway to the Northwest
Near Laurel Mountain Road (County Route 15), on the right when traveling east.
Confederate forces retreated from this area after the "Philippi Races" (June 3, 1861), first land battle of the Civil War. At Huttonsville, 26 miles south, Confederate General Robert S. Garnett took command of the Army of the Northwest. His goal was . . . — Map (db m34455) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Junior — Barbour County / Randolph County
On Junior-Philippi-Grafton Road (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling south.
(South Facing Side): Barbour CountyFormed from Harrison, Lewis, and Randolph in 1843. It is named for a distinguished Virginia jurist, Philip Pendleton Barbour. Scene of opening hostilities on land between the armies of the North and . . . — Map (db m33928) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County Korean War Memorial
On Court Street at North Main Street (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling south on Court Street.
Barbour County Post 44 Dedicated to all Barbour County Veterans who served in the Korean War. July 29, 1989 — Map (db m33701) WM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial
On North Main Street (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling east.
This monument and park are dedicated in sincere appreciation of all Barbour County Vietnam era Veterans who served this great nation - United States of America 1961 - 1973 Dedicated on May 25, 1987 by United States Senator John D. Rockefeller IV . . . — Map (db m33758) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County War Memorial
On North Main Street (U.S. 250) at Church Street, on the right when traveling north on North Main Street.
(Front):1917 - 1919 In Memory of Oscar Granville Alexander Clayton Bosworth Brandon Jesse Gordon Cole Quincy C. Dadisman Okey E. Duckworth James Blaine Hovatter Everett Earl Ice David Oren Jones Fred E. Jones John Irvin Kramer Andrew . . . — Map (db m33708) WM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Battle of PhilippiTalbott's Hill — The First Campaign
On Circle Drive East, on the right when traveling north.
(Preface):In the spring of 1861, Union forces rushed into northwestern Virginia to secure the vital Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, protect important turnpikes, and support Unionists against Confederates. The two sides fought numerous . . . — Map (db m58700) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Birthplace - W.D. Zinn
On Beverly-Fairmont Pike (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling south.
One mile east is Woodbine Farm, birthplace of W.D. Zinn, noted farmer, writer and lecturer. He contributed much to scientific farming in this and adjoining states. "The Story of Woodbine Farm" is an autobiography of his work. — Map (db m33776) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — First Land Battle
On Beverly-Fairmont Pike (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling south.
First land battle between the North and South here, June 3, 1861. Confederates under Col. Porterfield were dislodged by Federal troops from Gen. McClellan's army under Col. Kelley. The old covered bridge here was used by both armies. — Map (db m33777) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Historic Campbell School
On Graystone Drive, on the right when traveling south.
(Front): After the Civil War, Barbour County residents built this one-room school house near Volga, 8 miles SW. As one of the county's first free schools, it was the center of education for hundreds of children, providing instruction for . . . — Map (db m33815) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Confederate Retreat — The First Campaign
On Main Street (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling east.
Col. George A. Porterfield moved his newly recruited Confederates from Grafton on May 28, 1861, after receiving word of a Federal advance on the B&O Railroad. Porterfield's force a Philippi totaled no more than 775 volunteers. Few were fully trained . . . — Map (db m33672) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Philippi
On North Main Street (U.S. 250) at Court Street, on the right when traveling north on North Main Street.
Originally called Anglin's Ford for William Anglin but later named Booth's Ferry for Daniel Booth. Near by in 1780, Richard, Cottrill, and Charity Talbott settled. Philippi was named for Judge Philip Pendleton Barbour. — Map (db m33702) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Commands — The First Campaign
On Mansfield Drive (U.S. 250) at North Main Street (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling east on Mansfield Drive.
Col. Benjamin F. Kelley Kelley, a railroad agent in Philadelphia and former resident of Wheeling, was called back to command the First Virginia (Union) Infantry - the first Union regiment raised in the South. He planned and led the attack on . . . — Map (db m33760) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Federal Attack — The First Campaign
On College Hill Drive, on the right when traveling south.
On June 2, 1861, Federal troops advanced on Philippi from the Baltimore & Ohio rail hub at Grafton in two columns of about 1500 men each. The left column, under Col. Benjamin Kelley, took the train six miles east to Thornton, and then marched south . . . — Map (db m33816) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Casualties
On Main Street at Church Street on Main Street.
As Col Benjamin Kelley’s Federals pursued the Confederates through Philippi, he was shot in the upper right chest by Col. George A. Porterfield’s quartermaster. A surgeon declared it a mortal wound but Kelley recovered. In a show of respect, his men . . . — Map (db m63852) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — The Covered Bridge
On Main Street (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling east.
The Philippi Covered Bridge across Tygart Valley River was built in 1852 by Lemuel Chenoweth of Beverly. Made of wood, with the exception of the iron bolts used to hold the segments together, it is an example of the best in covered bridge . . . — Map (db m33665) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — The Philippi Covered BridgePhilippi, WV — Scene of the First Land Battle of the Civil War
On Mansfield Drive (U.S. 250) at North Main Street, on the right when traveling east on Mansfield Drive.
Constructed in 1852 by Lemuel Chenoweth; masonry by Emanuel J. O'Brien, cost $12,151.24. The covered bridge, erected in 1852, is the only two-lane bridge in the federal highway system. During the Civil War the bridge served both North and South in . . . — Map (db m33762) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Valley Furnace — Valley Furnace
On State Highway 38, on the right when traveling west.
Iron ore was discovered here, 1835, by John Johnson. The Old Iron Furnace, built, 1848, was operated for six years by C.W. Bryant and Isaac Marsh. In 1850, a steam engine replaced the water power used to run fan air blast. Charcoal was fuel used. . . . — Map (db m33929) HM

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