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Greenbrier County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Wide view of the Alderson Marker image, Touch for more information
By PaulwC3, August 22, 2014
Wide view of the Alderson Marker
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Alderson — Alderson
Settled in 1777 by “Elder” John Alderson, the frontier missionary. He organized the first Baptist church in the Greenbrier Valley. In 1763, the Muddy Creek settlements were destroyed by Shawnee Indians under Cornstalk. — Map (db m76515) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Alderson — Alderson Baptist Academy and Junior College
Alderson Academy opened September 18, 1901, a coeducational secondary school founded mainly through the efforts of Miss Emma C. Alderson. Closely associated with Greenbrier Baptist Church, after 1910 control was assumed by W. Va. Baptist . . . — Map (db m76519) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Alderson — Greenbrier County / Summers County
Marker Front: Formed, 1778, from Botetourt and Montgomery. Named for the river which drains it. This county had many pioneer forts and saw many bloody Indian battles. Here are the world-famed White Sulphur and other mineral springs. . . . — Map (db m76636) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Alta — Andrew & Charles Lewis March
The nearby highway is part of route traversing W.Va. From Lewisburg to Point Pleasant memorialized by the state to commemorate the march of the American Colonial army of 1,200 men led by Andrew & Charles Lewis. After a month's march this army . . . — Map (db m55819) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Alta — Fort Donnally/Border Heroes
Fort Donnally Built by Andrew Donnally a few miles north about 1771. Attack on this fort by 200 Indians in 1778 was second most important frontier engagement in the State. The fort was relieved by force under Colonel John Stuart.

Border . . . — Map (db m55818) HM

West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Asbury — Unknown Soldiers/ Gen. Lewis' Trace
Unknown Soldiers Six miles west, a Confederate regt. from Georgia camped at Blue Sulphur Springs in improvised shelters, during the winter of 1863. Many died of exposure and disease, and are buried on the hill 400 yards north of the . . . — Map (db m100004) HM WM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Caldwell — Berea Sand
The massive pebbly sandstone exposed in the cliff is the Berea of the driller and geologist. This sand produces large quantities of oil and natural gas in West Virginia. — Map (db m76501) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Caldwell — Confederate Saltpeter Works — Civil War Industrial Center
Although saltpeter (potassium nitrate or nitre), an essential element in the manufacture of gunpowder, had been mined at Organ Cave since the eighteenth century, the need for the mineral increased dramatically during the Civil War. Several saltpeter . . . — Map (db m59342) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Fairlea — The Hanging of David Creigh
In November 1863, David S. Creigh, a well-known southern sympathizer, found a Union soldier ransacking his home and harassing his wife. In the ensuing fight, Creigh killed the man, then hid the body. Later arrested, Creigh was tried and, on June 10, . . . — Map (db m110028) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Frankford — Frankford
Col. John Stuart, who came here in 1769 with McClanahan, the Renicks, and companions, bought out earlier claims of William Hamilton. "The Cliffs" to the east offer one of the celebrated beauty spots of Greenbrier Valley. — Map (db m50389) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — A — Battle of Lewisburg — 23 May 1862
The 3rd Provisional Ohio Brigade's camp was on this hill. The Confederate artillery opened the battle at 5 a.m. with a bombardment of the Federal camp. — Map (db m21739) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Battle of Lewisburg — A Brief Fight
Early in May 1862, Union Col. George Crook, 36th Ohio Infantry, led his command from Charleston to raid the Virginia Central Railroad near Covington. After tearing up track and burning a bridge, he and his men arrived in Lewisburg on May 17, with . . . — Map (db m59344) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — K — Battle of Lewisburg — 23 May 1862
Confederate dead were laid out in the Old Stone Church & then buried in the churchyard without ceremony. After the war their remains were moved to the present Confederate Cemetery. — Map (db m75375) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Big Lime
The Greenbrier Limestone in the quarry represent the "Big Lime" of the driller. Fish-egg like oφlitic zones in the "Big Lime" produce oil and natural gas in West Virginia. — Map (db m97799) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall, built in 1902, by Lewisburg Female Institute and citizens of the Greenbrier Valley area. It is one of only three Halls in the U.S. named for Andrew Carnegie who gave $26,750. Local citizens gave $10,000 to complete the Hall. . . . — Map (db m61464) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Col. John Stuart/Mathew Arbuckle
Col. John Stuart Col. John Stuart built Stuart Manor, 1789, near Fort Stuart. He was a military and civil leader and led a company in the Battle of Point Pleasant. As clerk of Greenbrier County, he left many historic records. His first office is . . . — Map (db m50394) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Colonial Army Rendezvous
Here at Fort Union, built in 1770, a frontier army of 1100 men assembled in 1774 under command of Gen. Andrew Lewis. On Sept. 12, the army began a march through 160 miles of trackless wilderness to the mouth of the Kanawha River and defeated . . . — Map (db m75198) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Confederate Cemetery
Remains of 95 unknown Confederate soldiers who fought in the Battle of Lewisburg on 23 May 1862 lie in this cross shaped common grave. It has an upright 80 feet long and cross arms of 40 feet. After the Civil War the unclaimed dead were removed from . . . — Map (db m21740) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Confederate Cemetery / The Civil War
Side A On the hill, 400 yards west, in a common grave shaped like a cross, lie unclaimed bodies of ninety-five Confederate soldiers, casualties of the area, including those of the Battle of Droop Mountain and the Battle of Lewisburg. . . . — Map (db m21748) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Dick Pointer
Enslaved African, noted for bravery in defense of Fort Donnally during Shawnee attack May 29, 1778. He was granted his freedom by James Rodgers in 1801. Land granted to other defenders; his 1795 pension petition, supported locally, denied. . . . — Map (db m21737) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Greenbrier County Courthouse
Constructed 1837 by John W. Dunn, well known local brickmason. All brick was made locally. Building has been in constant use since its completion and is unchanged except for wings added in 1937 and 1963. — Map (db m50471) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Greenbrier County War Memorial
Dedicated to the Greenbrier Countians who were killed in the service of our country, to the former Prisoners of War, and to those who are still Missing in Action World War I • World War II Korean War • Vietnam War [Honor . . . — Map (db m75365) WM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Greenbrier Military School
First established at Lewisburg 1808-09 by Dr. John McElhenney and chartered as an academy in 1812. Used as barracks and hospital during War between the States. Present buildings on north side of town built 1921. — Map (db m19378) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Greenbrier Military School
First school was established 1808-09 by Dr. John McElhenney and chartered as an academy in 1812. Used as barracks and hospital during War between the States. The present buildings were erected in 1921. — Map (db m19382) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Lewisburg — The Battle of Lewisburg
The Battle of Lewisburg was fought on May 23, 1862, between the Southern forces of General Henry A. Heth and the Northern forces of Colonel George Crook, later famous as the captor of Geronimo. The inhabitants of Lewisburg, Virginia, a peaceful town . . . — Map (db m21738) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Lewisburg — Old Confederate Cemetery . A Civil War Burial Ground
The remains of 95 unknown Confederate soldiers from the Battle of Lewisburg, fought May 23, 1862, lie in this cross-shaped common grave. It has a vertical length 80 feet long and a cross arm of 40 feet long, with an overall width of 10 feet. . . . — Map (db m21742) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Lewisburg
Side A Site of Fort Savannah, built in 1755. Here at Camp Union Gen. Andrew Lewis mustered troops which participated in the Battle of Point Pleasant 1774. Lewisburg was incorporated in October, 1782, by the Virginia Assembly. Side B . . . — Map (db m21747) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Lewisburg Battle
Confederate troops under Gen. Henry Heth here, May 23, 1862, were repulsed in attach upon division of Col. Geo. Crook's brigade. The Old Stone Church was used as a hospital. In his retreat, Heth burned bridge over Greenbrier at Caldwell. — Map (db m19380) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Lewisburg Graded School Bell
This bell installed Lewisburg Graded School 1878 Given to park by George L. Lemon — Map (db m75176) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Pontiac's War/Welsh Cemetery
Pontiac's WarMassacre of white families of Muddy Creek and of the Clendenins near here by a band of Shawnee Indians led by Chief Cornstalk, in 1763, completed the destruction of the early settlements in the Greenbrier Valley.

Welsh . . . — Map (db m50395) HM

West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Rev. John McElhenney, D.D. — Born March 1781 • Died Jan. 2nd, 1871
For sixty two years, the Beloved Pastor of Lewisburg Church. A faithful servant of God and a Pioneer of Presbyterianism in a vast part of Virginia. — Map (db m75364) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Lewisburg — Tribute to Men of the Mountains
"Leave me but a banner to plant upon the mountains of Augusta and I will rally around me the men who will lift our bleeding country from the dust, and set her free." ....Washington . . . — Map (db m75200) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Rainelle — Meadow River Lumber Company/United Methodist Church
Meadow River Lumber CompanyEstablished as Raine-Andrew Lumber Co. concern with purchase of 32,000 ac. (1906-08) by John & Tom Raine, namesake of Rainelle, founded 1908. Used logging railroad from woods to mill & Sewell Valley RR (NF&G) to C&O. . . . — Map (db m50391) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Ronceverte — Organ Cave
In this cave, whose beautiful natural formations have long been known, salt petre was manufactured before 1835. When war broke out between the states in 1861, it was a source of powder supply for General Lee's army. — Map (db m76509) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Ronceverte — Ronceverte
From the French word meaning “Greenbrier”. Thomas Edgar settled in Greenbrier County before 1780. His son built first grist mill on Greenbrier River. Three successive mills were destroyed but the fourth plant operates today. — Map (db m76513) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Rupert — Rupert
A post office was established here in 1889 and the village was incorporated in 1945. Named for Dr. Cyrus A. Rupert (1812-1891), a prominent local physician. The first settler here was William McClung (1738-1833) who came in 1766. A soldier in the . . . — Map (db m50390) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Sam Black Church — Sam Black Church
Built in 1901, church building was dedicated in memory of the Rev. Sam Black (1813 - 1899). He preached here in the 1880s - 90s. Born in Rupert & licensed in 1840, Black was a Methodist circuit rider almost fifty years. Sam Black Church, a spiritual . . . — Map (db m55766) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), Smoot — Greenbrier Ghost
Interred in nearby cemetery is Zona Heaster Shue. Her death in 1897 was presumed natural until her spirit appeared to her mother to describe how she was killed by her husband Edward. Autopsy on the exhumed body verified the apparition's account. . . . — Map (db m50356) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — "Oakhurst" Golf Club
Site of the first organized golf club in United States. It was formed, 1884, on the "Oakhurst estate of owner, Russell W. Montague, a New Englander and Scotchmen" George Grant, Alexander m. and Roderick McLeod and Lionel Torrin. — Map (db m21752) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — Dry Creek Battle
A two-day encounter, Aug. 26-27, 1863, between Gen. Sam Jones' Confederates and Gen. W. W. Averell's Federals. Action is also known as Howard's Creek, White Sulphur Springs and Rocky Gap. Losses: 350. — Map (db m76721) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — Greenbrier County / Virginia
Greenbrier County. Formed, 1778, from Botetourt and Montgomery. Named for the river which drains it. This county had many pioneer forts and saw many bloody Indian battles. Here are the world-famed White Sulphur and other mineral springs. . . . — Map (db m84054) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — Kate's Mountain
Named for Kate Carpenter, whose husband, Nathan, was killed by the Indians. fine scenic view. Home of Kate's Mountain Clover and other rare plants, such as the Box Huckleberry, 6000 years old - the oldest living thing. — Map (db m19363) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — President's Cottage
Built in 1834-1835 by Stephen Henderson First Summer White House Occupied by Martin Van Buren John Tyler Millard Fillmore Franklin Pierce James Buchanan — Map (db m85210) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — Tennis and the Outdoor Swimming Pool
When the Golf Clubhouse was built in 1915 clay tennis courts were added in front of the building. The most famous tennis tournaments at The Greenbrier were the Mason and Dixon Championships held each April from 1921 to 1937. One of the final . . . — Map (db m75435) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — The Battle of White Sulphur
Was fought on this site August 26th and 27th 1863. The Confederates, some of Major General Sam Jones' forces were commanded by Colonel George S. Patton and the Federal by Brigadier General William W. Averell. About 4000 troops were engaged. General . . . — Map (db m76728) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — The Greenbrier Clinic and Project Greek Island
The West Virginia Wind atop Copeland's Hill was built in the early 1960's to provide more hotel rooms and a new location for the Greenbrier Clinic. The Clinic had opened in 1948 offering personalized diagnostic medical care in a resort setting. This . . . — Map (db m85209) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — The Old White — 1858 - 1922
Here stood a famous hostelry affectionately known as The Old White Once the pride of the Old Dominion Whose gracious hospitality, beautiful surroundings and healing waters gained national renown and made it the object of many a . . . — Map (db m19360) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — The Springhouse
- symbol of The Greenbrier since 1835 because it sits atop the White Sulphur Spring. "Taking the waters" - either by bathing or by drinking for medicinal purposes - was the foundation of this resort. Earliest recorded use of the mineral water . . . — Map (db m75421) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — The Springhouse
Early European settlers in this Allegheny Mountain valley learned from Shawnee Indian hunters about this sulphur water spring. Health-seekers soon started arriving to bathe in the waters to relieve the aches of rheumatism. By the 1830's the . . . — Map (db m75422) HM
West Virginia (Greenbrier County), White Sulphur Springs — White Sulphur
Side A Large Federal fish hatcheries are located here. A mile east on Howard's Creek the armies of North and South fought in 1863. At "Oakhurst" three miles north the first golf club in America was organized in 1884. Side B Twelve . . . — Map (db m19361) HM

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