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Kanawha County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Belle Works Marker image, Touch for more information
By Forest McDermott, May 27, 2008
Belle Works Marker
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Belle — Belle Works
At this site, April 1926, E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Co. produced first successful, commercially synthesized ammonia from air and water. This initiated a progression of synthetic products: methyl alcohol, antifreeze, nitrates for explosives and . . . — Map (db m50468) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Belle — Samuel Shrewsbury House
House built circa 1810 by Samuel Shrewsbury (1763-1855) on a 704 acre tract of land received from Colonel John Dickinson. Sandstone and hewn hardwood logs used in construction were obtained locally from the land. Shrewsbury, a revolutionary soldier, . . . — Map (db m76882) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Big Chimney — Simon Kenton
Simon Kenton, the hero of the Virginia and Kentucky borders, with George Strader and John Yeager, camped on Elk River, 1771-73. Attacked by Indians, Yeager was killed, but Kenton and Strader, although wounded, made their escape. — Map (db m49921) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Cedar Grove — Andrew & Charles Lewis March
The nearby highway is part of route traversing W. Va. from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant memorialized by the state to commemorate the march of the American Colonial army of 1,200 men led by Andrew & Charles Lewis. After a month's march this army . . . — Map (db m50409) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Cedar Grove — First Settlers
Walter Kelly settled here about 1773 but was killed by Indians. William Morris came here in 1774 and made first permanent settlement in this valley. He built a fort, had a "boat yard," and started a church and school. — Map (db m50406) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Cedar Grove — Historic Church
Virginia's Chapel was built in 1853 as gift for Wm. Tompkins' daughter, Virginia. Used by both sides during the Civil War, Methodists acquired church in 1901. Building lengthened in 19th cent., cupola added in 1912. Placed on National Register in . . . — Map (db m50407) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — "The West Virginia Coal Miner"
Earl Ray Tomblin President Senate        Bob Wise  Governor       Robert S. Kiss, Speaker House of Delegates                                                       By Resolution of the Seventy-Fourth Legislature            "The West . . . — Map (db m49802) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Abraham Lincoln Walks At Midnight
[East Side] "Abraham Lincoln Walks At Midnight" from poem by Vachel Lindsay Sculptor Fred Martin Torrey 1884-1967 Born in Fairmont, West Virginia Dedicated June 20, 1974 Arch A. Moore, Jr. Governor [South Side] . . . — Map (db m23019) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Baptism By FireTo Arms!
In July 1861, this area swarmed with retreating Confederate troops and pursuing Federal forces. Union Gen. George B. McClelland had ordered Gen. Jacob Cox to march his 3, 000 raw Ohio recruits into western Virginia from Gallipolis, Ohio, to drive . . . — Map (db m59146) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Battle of CharlestonDowntown Battleground — Jenkins's Raid
(Preface): Confederate Gen. Albert G. Jenkins led 550 cavalrymen on a 500 mile raid, Aug. 22-Sept. 12, 1862, attacking Federal forces, capturing prisoners, and destroying military stores. From Salt Sulphur Springs he rode along the Tygart and . . . — Map (db m59137) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Battle of CharlestonLightburn's Retreat — Jenkins's Raid
(Preface): Confederate Gen. Albert G. Jenkins led 550 cavalrymen on a 500-mile raid from Salt Sulphur Springs, Aug. 22-Sept. 12, 1862, attacking Federal forces and destroying military stores. He captured and paroled 300 Union soldiers, . . . — Map (db m59143) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Booker Taliaferro Washington
1856 - Born a lowly slave; 1915 - Died a great American. Famous educator, author, lecturer and advocate of the doctrine of interracial cooperation. Booker T. Washington was born near Hale's Ford, Franklin, County, VA. He spent his . . . — Map (db m23024) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Charleston 's Civil War SitesThe Past is Present
Two significant dwellings that stood elsewhere during the Civil War have been relocated to this park for public use: Craik-Patton House. The Rev. James Craik, son of George Washington’s personal secretary, constructed this house in downtown . . . — Map (db m59136) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Craik-Patton House
Built 1834 as "Elm Grove" by James Craik, grandson of Geo. Washington's personal physician. Sold to George Smith Patton, 1858, and retained by family until end of Civil War. Born here was father of noted World War II general Geo. S. Patton. Moved to . . . — Map (db m50419) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Daniel Boone
Across the Great Kanawha River, lived Daniel Boone, the noted frontiersman, from about 1788 to 1795. He represented Kanawha County in the Virginia Assembly, 1791; was Lieut. Col. of Virginia militia during Indian wars. — Map (db m50466) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Daniel BooneThe Western Virginia Pioneer 1788-1799
1789 Lt. Col. Of Kanawha Militia An Organizer of Kanawha County 1791 Delegate to Virginia Assembly His Cabin was Across the River from Cave in Cliff Above He hunted Deer and Made Salt From a Spring at the Water's Edge

Erected by . . . — Map (db m50467) HM

West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Executive Mansion
In 1924, ground was broken for this magnificent Georgian colonial style mansion, official home of the State's governors since 1926. Designed by W. F. Martens, it was constructed of colonial Harvard brick at an initial cost of $203,000. — Map (db m42673) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — First Gas Well
In 1815 Captain James Wilson while drilling here for salt brine vowed he would drill to Hades if necessary. A large flow of gas was struck that ignited and burned with a huge flame, apparently fulfilling the captain's original vow. — Map (db m50417) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Fort Clendenin1788
[Front] Saved by two historic rides for powder. Ann Bailey on horseback through wilderness to Lewisburg and return. Fleming Cobbs poled down Kanawha River to Point Pleasant and return. [Rear] This boulder is . . . — Map (db m23013) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Fort Lee
A western frontier outpost, guarding settlers against the Indians. Built here in 1788 and named for Gen. Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, one of Washington's most trusted officers. Later Lee was governor of Virginia. — Map (db m50416) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Kanawha Riflemen1861-1865
This memorial erected by the Kanawha Riflemen Chapter United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of the Kanawha Riflemen First organization of the company 1856 Capt. George S. Patton ∙ First Lieut. Andrew Moore ∙ . . . — Map (db m81351) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Lewis’ March
Near this place, the army of Gen. Andrew Lewis camped, Sept. 21, 1774, enroute from Lewisburg. From Charleston, Lewis led his men by land and water to Point Pleasant where Cornstalk’s Indians were defeated, Oct. 10, 1774. — Map (db m76824) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — KA 3/KA 4 — Malden / Booker T. Washington Homeplace
Marker Front: Malden Early salt-making industry that was centered here peaked in the 1850s. In 1755, Mary Ingles and Betty Draper made salt for their Indian captors here at "Buffalo Salt Licks." John Dickinson bought the site in 1785. . . . — Map (db m76880) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Military OccupationA Bitter Pill to Swallow
"I direct you to have guns in readiness to fire on Charleston. If rebels come in here Charleston shall be destroyed, for it is the work of disloyal citizens." - Gen. Eliakim P. Scammon, May 112, 1863, to Col. Rutherford B. Hayes. Union and . . . — Map (db m59139) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Presidential PresenceTending to Family, Fort, and Ferry
Camp White, the main Union camp at Charleston, was located directly across the Kanawha River from here. Col. Rutherford B. Hayes, 23rd Ohio Infantry, occupied the camp and Charleston in March 1863. He ordered his men to build a fort on top of the . . . — Map (db m59521) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Rev. Ruffner's Grave
In cemetery nearby is grave of Dr. Henry Ruffner, eminent theologian and writer, called father of Presbyterianism in the Kanawha region. After his ministry, he became head of Washington College, Lexington, Va. Wrote Ruffner Pamphlet. — Map (db m76879) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — X-2 — Ruffner Well
In 1808 David and Joseph Ruffner near here on the bank of the Kanawha completed a well into solid rock to a depth of 59 feet by a method and with drilling tools they devised, which was further developed in this valley by themselves and Billye Morris . . . — Map (db m76859) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol first located in Wheeling, 1863; moved to Charleston, 1870; back to Wheeling, 1875; and finally to Charleston, 1885. It was located two miles west until destroyed by fire, 1921. Present building was completed in 1931. — Map (db m23018) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol first located in Wheeling, 1863; located in Charleston, 1870; again in Wheeling, 1875, and finally in Charleston, 1885. It was located 2 mi. west until destroyed by fire, 1921. Present building was completed in 1932. — Map (db m42674) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
Constructed of buff Indiana limestone and lined with Imperial Danby marble from Vermont, the State's Capitol is considered one of the world's superb examples of Italian Renaissance architecture. Designed by the internationally prominent Cass Gilbert . . . — Map (db m42676) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol is much traveled; Wheeling to Charleston to Wheeling and then back to Charleston, it moved. At this spot it stood from 1885 until destroyed by fire in 1921. The Capitol now stands two miles east. — Map (db m76738) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The 35th Star* * * West Virginia Statehood
Sectional differences in western and eastern Virginia fueled resentment and political divisions before the Civil War. The divisions soon became irrevocable after the convention in Richmond voted on April 17, 1861, for Virginia to secede and join . . . — Map (db m42895) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Block
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urban . . . — Map (db m76741) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Block
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urban . . . — Map (db m76760) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The New Deal In Your CommunityKanawha Boulevard
Kanawha Boulevard has gone by various names throughout history. The Boulevard was known as Front Street when "Charles Town" was chartered in 1794. Through the years, it has been called First Street, Water Street and Kanawha Street prior to being . . . — Map (db m85208) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Ruffners
Grave of Joseph Ruffner, who bought the site of Charleston from the Clendenins. His son, Daniel, built Holly Mansion on Kanawha Street in 1815. The Ruffners aided oil and gas development by improved drills used in salt wells. — Map (db m23014) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Thomas J. Jackson"Stonewall"
[South Side] Born Jan. 21, 1824 Clarksburg, VA. Now West Virginia, Confederate General Died May 10, 1863 [East Side] This monument first located on original state capitol grounds Sept. 27, 1910; relocated to the present . . . — Map (db m23016) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Union Civil War Monument
[South Side] In memory of the thirty-two thousand soldiers, sailors, and marines contributed by West Virginia to the service of the Union during the Civil War 1861-1865 [East Side] This monument erected A.D. 1930 by the Union . . . — Map (db m23025) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — War At The Front DoorLittlepage Mansion
In July 1861, this area swarmed with retreating Confederate troops and pursuing Federal forces. Union Gen. George B. McClellan had ordered Gen. Jacob Cox to march his 3,000 raw Ohio recruits into western Virginia from Gallipolis, Ohio, to drive . . . — Map (db m59150) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — West Virginia Home Guards
[East Side] Montani Semper Liberi Dedicated to the hallowed memories of the brave men and devoted women who saved West Virginia to the Union. Presented to the state and people of West Virginia through the instrumentalities of the Grand . . . — Map (db m23055) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — William Blizzard
Born in Kanawha County on 19 September 1892. Began work as a miner at age ten, and served as field organizer, UMWA. Noted as leader of 1921 Armed March. Indicted for treason but later acquitted. President of District 17 and vice-president of West . . . — Map (db m23011) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Clendenin — Petrochemical Plant
In 1920, Union Carbide built first plant for the production of synthetic organic chemicals from natural gas on a site directly across Elk River. From this nucleus grew the nation's giant petrochemical industry, employer of thousands. — Map (db m50465) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Clendenin — Town of Clendenin
Area at confluence of Elk and Big Sandy rivers settled late 1700s; town laid out 1877 by W. Chilton; Incorp. May 1904; L. V. Koontz first mayor. Main industries: timber, coal, oil, gas, and railroad, after 1893. South, at Falling Rock Creek, was . . . — Map (db m91225) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Cross Lanes — Kanawha County / Putnam County
Kanawha County. Authorized, 1888; organized 1789 from Greenbrier and Montgomery. Named for the Kanawha River, bearing name of Indian tribe. Salt making brought early settlers into the valley and from it grew vast modern chemical plants. . . . — Map (db m85987) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Dunbar — Andrew & Charles Lewis March
The nearby highway is part of route traversing W. Va. from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant memorialized by the state to commemorate the march of the American Colonial army of 1,200 men led by Andrew & Charles Lewis. After a month's march this army . . . — Map (db m81415) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Dunbar — Indian Mound / Mounds-Earthworks
Indian Mounds Here in the Shawnee Reservation is found an Indian mound which was probably excavated in 1884 by the Smithsonian Institution. The results of the archaeologists' work suggest that the mound was built between A.D. 1 and 500 . . . — Map (db m81414) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), East Bank — Coalburg
Here was the home of W.H. Edwards, naturalist and explorer, who led an important expedition to the Amazon in 1846 and was one of the chief authorities on butterflies and moths. He was a descendant of renowned Jonathan Edwards. — Map (db m34493) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Elkview — Captain John Young/John Young Early Settler
Captain John Young Grave of Revolutionary War Vet. John Young (1760-1850) located in nearby Sand Run Cemetery. Noted soldier, Indian scout & trapper, he came to Kanawha Val., 1780s, named county trustee, 1794, and farmed 225 acres here. . . . — Map (db m50412) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Institute — West Virginia State University
First public black college in state founded in 1891 as West Virginia Colored Institute. In 1927 was first fully accredited black land-grant college in US. In 1915, became West Virginia Collegiate Institute; in 1929, West Virginia State College. . . . — Map (db m81413) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Malden — The Necessary IngredientMalden's Salt Works
In the decades before the Civil War, this region, called the Kanawha Salines, had a booming salt industry. Salt extraction created vast wealth here, and by 1846, this area had led the nation with 3.2 million bushels produced. During the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m59152) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), South Charleston — Indian Mound
In 1883 The Smithsonian Institution excavated the South Charleston or Criel mound. Thirteen skeleton were found, most of them in a large log tomb at the base of the mound, along with a few grave offerings. The mound was built by the Adena Culture, . . . — Map (db m45246) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — Bangor Cemetery
This land, which was owned by George Washington, purchased by Morris Hudson, who in 1819 built a small church on knoll that adjoined this property. As was custom of the times, acres set aside as a cemetery for members of Bangor Parish. The church . . . — Map (db m49922) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — Fort Tackett
Nearby stood Fort Tackett, destroyed by Indians, 1790. Near the fort the day before the attack, Mrs. John Young gave birth to a son, the first white child born in this valley. The Youngs and a few others escaped to Fort Lee. — Map (db m50410) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — George Washington
Acquired 2,000 acres of this land by a patent dated April 12, 1784, issued to him by Benjamin Harrison, Governor of Virginia. Washington obtained this tract upon a survey made by John Floyd, April 18, 1784 with a land warrant issued to Charles . . . — Map (db m81412) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — Morgan Kitchen Museum
Constructed in 1846. This cabin served as kitchen house for the 600-acre estate of John Morgan. The day before the Battle of Scary, on July 16, 1861, Union troops commanded by Gen. Jacob D. Cox camped on the Morgan estate and were fed from this . . . — Map (db m34378) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — St. Albans Archeological Site
Discovered in 1963 by Sam Kessell. Recognized as one of the oldest and deepest stratified sites of the Early Archaic period (8,000-10,000 BC). Artifacts recovered document early inhabitants who camped here along Kanawha River, were small . . . — Map (db m34492) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — St. Albans Covered Bridge
Located at the site of the crossing of the James River and Kanawha Turnpike and Coal River. Covered Toll Bridge, built 1831 by Phillip Thompson and James Teays, replaced a ferry which operated in the same location. Bridge, one of the longest in . . . — Map (db m81411) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), St. Albans — Washington's Land
George Washington's "Cole" River Tract of 2,000 acres was surveyed by John Floyd in 1774 and patented April 12, 1774. Bounded by the Coal and Kanawha Rivers, "5 miles and 88 poles", it embraced the site of St. Albans. — Map (db m50469) HM

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