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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Tucker County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Salt Sands Marker with trail steps. image, Touch for more information
By Roger Dean Meyer, October 12, 2008
Salt Sands Marker with trail steps.
West Virginia (Tucker County), Davis — Salt Sands
The resistant Homewood and Conoquenessing sandstones, the “Salt Sands” of the driller, form the Canyon Walls and Blackwater Falls. These sands produce oil and natural gas in West Virginia and commercial brines on the Kanawha and Ohio . . . — Map (db m69720) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Montrose — Seneca Trail
The Seneca Trail, or Warriors' Path, was the Indian highway from New York to the South. In West Virginia, it followed in general the Alleghenies and this trail, made by moccasined feet centuries ago, may be seen at many points today. — Map (db m24412) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Williams v. Board of Education Case
In 1892, Coketon Colored School teacher Carrie Williams sued the local school board for equal pay. She was represented by the first African American lawyer in WV, J.R. Clifford, in front of Judge Hoke. Local jury found for her and she won appeal at . . . — Map (db m74854) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corricks Ford
This Stone Commemorates the Battle of Corricks FordFought July 13 - 1861, on Shavers Fork here Gen. Robert S. Garnett fell the first officer killed in the Civil War — Map (db m23653) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corricks Ford — Retreat Becomes Disaster — The First Campaign
Federal victory at Rich Mountain on July 11, 1861, forced Confederate Gen. Robert S. Garnett's 4,000 troops to retreat from Laurel Hill in Barbour County. Garnett, fearing that his escape route was blocked, struck northeast. His goal was to circle . . . — Map (db m23746) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corrick's Ford
After the Confederate defeat in the Tygarts Valley early in 1861, Gen. R.S. Garnett, the Southern leader, withdrew. Here he was overtaken by Federals under his West Point classmate, Gen. T.A. Morris, his army defeated and himself mortally wounded. — Map (db m23646) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corrick's Ford Battle
1861 - 1865 Corrick's Ford Battle engagement between Federal troops under Gen. T.A. Morris and Confederate troops under Gen. R.S. Garnett, one mile south, July 13, 1861. Garnett, mortally wounded in this action, was the first general to . . . — Map (db m33621) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corricks Ford Battlefield — Death of a General and Birth of a State
"They have not given me an adequate force. I can do nothing. They have sent me to my death." Gen. Robert S. Garnet CSA "I have made a very clean sweep of it." Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan USA Confederate Gen. Robert S. . . . — Map (db m23654) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corricks Ford Battlefield — Tale of the Monuments
"No shaft of shining marble, new From the sculptor's hand we raise for you No, here we lay A boulder drawn from the river-side Where brave men battled and bled and died." Karl Myers, Ode to the Battle of Corricks Ford, 1926 On US Route . . . — Map (db m23766) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Corricks Ford Battlefield — First to Fall — General Garnett at Corricks Ford
"How gallantly he died in the discharge of his duty." President Jefferson Davis CSA On July 13, 1861, some 3,500 Confederate soldiers under Gen. Robert S. Garnett crossed Shavers Fork here while chased by Union forces in a desperate bid to . . . — Map (db m23769) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Parsons / Corrick's Ford
(South Side): John Crouch, pioneer settler, established "tomahawk rights" here in 1766, but the town was not incorporated until 1893. Here Shavers Fork and Blackwater unite to form the Cheat River. Hu Maxwell, the historian, lived near. . . . — Map (db m23641) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — The Corrick House — Corricks Ford Battlefield — Silent Witness to War
"We had [the general's] body taken to the house of Mr. Corrick, on the adjacent hill...and the next day we selected Garnett's own ambulance for his remains, which were placed in a box with salt." Capt. Henry W. Benham USA In front of you is . . . — Map (db m23729) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Tucker County Courthouse
Architect - Frank Pierce Milburn Built 1898 - c. 1900The original county seat at St. George was forcibly moved to Parsons at night on August 1, 1893. With the construction of the brick courthouse hopes of the return to St. George were lost forever. . . . — Map (db m34640) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Red Creek — John Wolford
Revolutionary War Soldier John Wolford 1754 - 1839 Built house here about 1805 — Map (db m34639) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), St George — St. George
First county seat. Here John Minear and son, Jonathan, after early visits, settled in 1776. Bot of them were killed by Indians, 1780–1781. Captain James Parsons and brother, Thomas, made settlements in the Horseshoe, 1772–1774. — Map (db m74908) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Thomas — Coketon Colored School
Segregated school located along the North Fork of the Blackwater that served Coketon, center of coal and coke empire of H. G. Davis. In 1892 teacher Carrie Williams, represented by J. R. Clifford, state’s first African Amerian lawyer, sued when . . . — Map (db m82119) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Thomas — Fairfax Stone
The Fairfax Stone (1/2 Mi.E.) marking the Potomac's headwaters, was a corner of Lord Fairfax's vast estate. The line of 1736 was checked in 1746 by a survey on which Peter Jefferson, father of Thomas Jefferson, was engaged. — Map (db m3945) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Thomas — Fairfax Stone
This monument, at the headspring of the Potomac River, marks one of the historic spots of America. Its name is derived from Thomas Lord Fairfax who owned all the land lying between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers. The first Fairfax Stone, marked . . . — Map (db m3946) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Thomas — The Blackwater
To the southwest is Blackwater Falls, 63 feet high, and its rugged gorge. It drains lovely Canaan Valley, which may be seen from the mountain top, 3700 feet high. It was made famous in “Blackwater Chronicles” by “Porte . . . — Map (db m74823) HM

19 markers matched your search criteria.
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