Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Park County Wyoming Historical Markers

 
"Corbett's Shebang" at Sinking Water Crossing Marker image, Touch for more information
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2015
"Corbett's Shebang" at Sinking Water Crossing Marker
Wyoming (Park County), Coby — "Corbett's Shebang" at Sinking Water Crossing
On September 10th 1880, Victor Arland and John F. Corbett set up the first mercantile establishment in the Big Horn Basin on the Indian Trace that follows Trail Creek. Looking to the cattlemen for business, they moved to Cottonwood Creek in 1883, . . . — Map (db m91138) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Arland & CorbettIndian Trading Post
Off in the distance in front of you, a large red butte lies against a much larger mountain, Rattlesnake Mountain. Flowing down the valley is Trail Creek, named for the ancient Indian trail that crosses the Shoshone River at the Indian ford in the . . . — Map (db m87571) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Balanced Plunger Hydraulic Valve — Buffalo Bill Dam
Balanced Plunger Hydraulic Valve This 48-inch diameter valve is one of two which were originally installed at the base of the Buffalo Bill Dam in 1922 to supply water to the Shoshone Powerplant and low level river outlet works. The two valves were . . . — Map (db m104003) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Ball Plug — Buffalo Bill Dam
Ball Plug This large wood and concrete ball plug was one of two used to halt the flow of water through the 42-inch diameter power outlet works conduits, located in the base of the dam. The balls facilitated the repair and maintenance of downstream . . . — Map (db m104004) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Belle Drewry1867 - 1897
Belle Drewry was born in 1867, just two years after the Civil War. Her birth place and family are unknown. It is known that she left home at an early age and changed her name. Belle was a rather attractive young woman; about five foot six inches . . . — Map (db m91077) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Buffalo Bill Dam
. . . — Map (db m104005) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Buffalo Bill Reservoir
Buffalo Bill Reservoir The Shoshone Project Story The development by the U.S. Reclamation Service of the great irrigation project in the lower Shoshone valley required sacrifice of their land by the settlers living in the upper part of the . . . — Map (db m104001) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Castle Rock
John Colter, famed among the famous breed of "Mountain Men," passed this landmark late in the fall of 1807 while on business for the fur trader Manuel Lisa. Searching for Indians in order to conduct trade, he also hunted salt caves reputedly located . . . — Map (db m91010) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Cedar MountainIndian Tree Burials and Frost Cave
Cedar Mountain, the mountain in front of you to the left of the canyon, was known to the Crow Indians as “the mountain of spirits.” Early settlers told of finding Indian tree burials on its northeast slope. Unfortunately, those sites . . . — Map (db m87566) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Colter’s HellWyoming
      John Colter, veteran of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, notably self-sufficient mountain man and indefatigable explorer, was the first white man known to have reconnoitered this locale. In 1807, possibly traveling alone but probably escorted . . . — Map (db m86150) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Colter’s Hell & Extinct Geyser Basin
Colter’s Hell is a large, mostly extinct, geyser basin. Today, there are a few hot springs, and vents which release sulphurous gasses along the Shoshone River. This site includes some of the world’s largest extinct geyser cones and thermal pools. . . . — Map (db m86147) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Eagle's Nest Stage Station
In the early 1890s, Thomas Lanchbury was hired by the Bell stage and freight line to build a stage station near Eagle's Nest Springs in Wyoming. The Eagle's Nest Stage Station was the midway point on the run between Red Lodge, Montana and Meeteese, . . . — Map (db m91134) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Indian Names for Land Features
Looking west is the Shoshone Canyon, named for the Shoshoni Indians, who hunted in the region. However, most of the Big Horn Basin had been Crow territory until the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868. West of the canyon, the north and the south forks of . . . — Map (db m87558) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Jim WhiteBuffalo Hunter • 1828-1880 — Reburied May 6, 1979
Jim White was born in Missouri in 1828. He found his way into the southwest as a young man, where he was a freighter with ox-drawn wagons. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Jim White served the Confederate Army as a grain buyer and wagon . . . — Map (db m91080) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston1824 - 1900
John Johnston was born of Scotch-English descent in New Jersey in 1824. Johnston, described as a 6'6", 250 pound giant , came west in the early 1840's as a tapper. He began his career in the Medicine Bow mountains of Wyoming, gradually working his . . . — Map (db m91019) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Lee Street – Cody City
The rocky ridge you are now crossing marks the southern edge of Lee Street, one of the original roads of Cody City. Wagon ruts, phone wires and rock cairn lot markers have been found along its path. In memory of Jerry Housel and Mary Elaine Housel . . . — Map (db m87580) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Old Cody City & Buffalo Bill Cody’s Town in the Rockies
Buffalo Bill Cody and some business partners established the Shoshone Irrigation Co. in 1894. Work began on the Cody Canal to bring water for crop irrigation from the South Fork of the Shoshone River, around the south side of Cedar Mountain. The . . . — Map (db m87556) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Old Trail Town
On this site in 1895, Western scout and showman William F. ("Buffalo Bill") Cody laid out the original townsite of Cody, Wyoming, which he named in his honor. Today Old Trail Town preserves the lifestyle and history of the Frontier West through a . . . — Map (db m91011) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Phillip H. Vetter1855 - 1892
Phillip Henry Vetter was born February 7, 1855 near Woodstock, Shenandoah County, Virginia. He was killed by a grizzly bear on the Greybull River in Wyoming in 1892. A few years after the Civil War, Phillip's family came West by wagon train and . . . — Map (db m91072) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Pioneer Stagecoach Drivers
      The pioneer stagecoach drivers of the Old West were as fiercely independent as any men the country has ever seen. They were men of whang-leather toughness, who were accustomed to the harshness of frontier life. They never failed to laugh in . . . — Map (db m87199) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Sampson E. Stilwell"Comanche Jack"
Sampson E. Stilwell, better known as "Comanche Jack," was born in Kansas in 1850 and served on the frontier during his youth as a scout and hunter. He is best known for his heroic deeds at the Battle of Beechers Island on September 6 (sic), 1868. . . . — Map (db m91074) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Shoshone CanyonWyoming
      Shoshone Canyon is a gorge cut through Rattlesnake Mountain by the wearing action of the Shoshone River. The mountain is a northwest trending uplift in the earth’s crust that rises 3700 feet above the surrounding terrain. Beds of sedimentary . . . — Map (db m86154) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Shoshone River SiphonThe Shoshone Project Story
The Heart Mountain Division of the Shoshone Project receives irrigation water directly from Buffalo Bill Reservoir via the Shoshone Canyon Conduit, a three-mile-long tunnel drilled through Cedar Mountain located to the left. From the conduit, the . . . — Map (db m87589) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Stone CirclesNear the River Crossing
On both sides of the Shoshone River there are many circles made of stones built by the Indians who frequented this area. Some of the sites are simply circles with no doorways, believed to be religious symbols associated with the circle of life or . . . — Map (db m87575) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — The American Mountain ManA Tribute
This monument, erected by the Brotherhood of the American Mountain Men, is "dedicated to all Mountain Men known and unknown for their essential part in the opening of the American West." It consists of two busts and six plaques honoring four . . . — Map (db m91017) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — The Panoramic View
Look to your left and you will see the canyon cut by the Shoshone River. The mountain to the left of the canyon is Cedar Mountain. To the right of Shoshone Canyon you can see Rattlesnake Mountain. The red butte (to the right of Rattlesnake Mt.) is . . . — Map (db m87565) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — The Pony Express1860-1861 -- 1960-1961 — Young Buffalo Bill Cody
Young Buffalo Bill Cody started his famous career with the great freighting firm of Russell, Majors and Waddell as a messenger boy. He became a spectacular Pony Express rider with the same firm and road between Red Buttes and Three Crossings, along . . . — Map (db m91008) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Trail to Old Cody CityFounded by Buffalo Bill Cody in 1895
Here on the prairie there are still visible remnants of several old wagon trails dating back to Cody City in the late 1800’s. The first buildings of Cody City were constructed on the nearby plain to the west, although the town was supposed to be . . . — Map (db m87586) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Upstream Cableway Winch — Buffalo Bill Dam
Upstream Cableway Winch This cableway winch, which was used to install and remove the ball plugs, trash racks, and the bulkhead gate for the left abutment outlet works, dates to the construction of the Shoshone Powerplant in 1922. It was . . . — Map (db m104002) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — W.A. Gallagher and Blind BillMurdered 1894
William Gallagher and his friend, Blind Bill, were killed on Meeteese Creek below the old town of Arland in mid-March of 1894. Both men, about thirty, were born during the Civil War period. Gallagher, who was somewhat of an outlaw, was tall, . . . — Map (db m91076) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — William Garlow Cody“Bill Cody”
Jan. 4, 1913           Sept. 18, 1992 Grandson of the World-Famous Colonel William F. Cody “Buffalo Bill” Bill Cody was born at Buffalo Bill’s “Scouts Rest Ranch” in North Platte, Nebraska. He died in Cody, Wyoming. He was . . . — Map (db m87560) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Cody — Yellowstone Fire Fighters
We the citizens of the Yellowstone gateway communities whose lives and properties were imperiled by the 1988 Yellowstone fires, hereby express our gratitude to those whose courage, skill and devotion tamed the inferno that devastated over 363,000 . . . — Map (db m87200) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Lamar Valley — Soda Butte
This travertine (calcium carbonate) mound was formed more than a century ago by a hot spring. Only small amounts of hydrothermal water and hydrogen sulfide gas currently flow from this once more prolific spring. This formation is very fragile. It . . . — Map (db m88308) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — A Good Duty Station
The lifespan of most Western military posts was measured in months, or several years. Accordingly, their structures were temporary, and many have long since vanished from the landscape. Fort Yellowstone was unusual because of its permanence and the . . . — Map (db m39727) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — A Most Fortunate Thing...
Before the Army arrived in Yellowstone, the park's future was in doubt. Vandals destroyed thermal features, squatters sawed down trees and poachers decimated herds of wildlife. Perhaps the Army's greatest contribution to Yellowstone's history was . . . — Map (db m39745) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — A Sense of Community
Fort Yellowstone was truly a community as well as a military outpost. The small village frequently assembled to welcome new residents or bid farewell to departing neighbors. The joys of births, christenings, and marriages mingles with the sorrows of . . . — Map (db m39742) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — A Soldier's Life
A solider lived with the rest of his company in the Troop Barracks (structure in front of you). A typical day began at 5:30 am, at the stable, just behind the barracks where the horses were fed. From that time until almost noon, soldiers . . . — Map (db m40589) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — At Guard
Protecting Yellowstone's wildlife and natural wonders was the primary function of the Army. An important part of this duty was managing the growing visitation to the park and watching for "shady characters." Park roads were once aligned so that . . . — Map (db m39729) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Boiling River TrailEndangered Stream
This stretch of river runs warmer than most mountain streams. A half mile up the trail, underground discharge from Mammoth Hot Springs enters the current and creates a year-round climate for water birds, trout, and aquatic plants. Over the years, . . . — Map (db m40583) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Fort Yellowstone
. . . — Map (db m103657) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — From Soldier to Ranger
In 1912, President Taft in a special message to Congress said: "I earnestly recommend the establishment of a bureau of National Parks. Such legislation is essential to the proper management of those wonderful manifestations of nature, so . . . — Map (db m40599) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Mt. Everts MudslidesTemporary Scenery
Landslides are epidemic in this valley. In late spring and summer, storm clouds travel through the Gardner River canyon, striking Mt. Everts from brief but intense showers. The dry, layered cliffs have little protective vegetation. Loosened by . . . — Map (db m40588) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Obsidian CliffVolcanic Glass
Yellowstone Plateau glowed red from volcanic activity, with molten rock welling up and spreading from numerous fissures. Obsidian Cliff, a 180,000-year-old lava flow, is part of the evidence. Cooling and shrinking, the lava solidified into large . . . — Map (db m83690) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Sheepeater Cliff
This cliff was named for the Shoshone Indians who lived throughout this mountainous region. Their use of bighorn sheep earned them the name "Tukadika" or "Sheepeaters". The cliff is basalt lava that formed "columnar joints" when it cooled nearly . . . — Map (db m83687) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — The Drill Field
Gathering place, site of ceremonies and parades, training ground - the drill field was the focal point of daily life at Fort Yellowstone. Each day began with a bugler sounding Reveille. Gradually, the Fort came to life and another bugle call . . . — Map (db m39723) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Mammoth Hot Springs — Welcome to Historic Fort Yellowstone
From 1886 until the creation of the National Park Service in 1916 the United States Army was responsible for the administration and management of Yellowstone National Park.

The row of buildings ahead of you is part of Historic Fort . . . — Map (db m40590) HM

Wyoming (Park County), Meeteetse — Arland1884 - - 1897 — Wyoming
      A few miles up Meeteetse Creek from here, stood one of the toughest settlements of Wyoming’s frontier history. The town was founded in the spring of 1884 by Victor Arland, a French businessman, and John Corbett, a buffalo hunter. From 1880 . . . — Map (db m87608) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Meeteetse — Site of Halfway House Stage StopWyoming
      At this spot in 1904, brothers Charles and George Wilson, builders of the Cody-Meeteetse Road, constructed a rock dugout near Dry Creek Spring. The primitive accommodation stood halfway between Corbett Crossing on the Shoshone River to the . . . — Map (db m87149) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Meeteetse — The Building of an IndustryWyoming’s Agriculture
      The agriculture producers of the Big Horn Basin invite you to enjoy our majestic mountains, pristine streams, and lush meadows. These meadows aren’t here for aesthetics; man has strived to irrigate this dry rocky land to make his cows . . . — Map (db m88968) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Meeteetse — The Prairie Rattlesnake
Less conspicuous than the pronghorn antelope and the golden eagle is an even more ancient inhabitant of the high plains and valleys of Wyoming, the prairie rattlesnake. Feared by many and respected by most, these pit vipers (so-called because of . . . — Map (db m88972) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Administrative Area:Relocation Camp Administration & Governance
In front of you stood the Administration Area which consisted of an H shaped Administration building, a small building to the right of the Administration building for the Block Managers Community Council offices, and a building to the south for the . . . — Map (db m91181) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Agriculture and Root Cellars
As you look through the site glass, you will see the only remaining root cellar of the original three. It is on private land and may not be visited. The evacuees cultivated farmland north of the living area, across the highway to the south and . . . — Map (db m91173) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Barracks Living Area:Camp Life at Heart Mountain
You are now overlooking the entire living area of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center. More than 10,000 men, women and children lived in the area bounded on your left by at the red brick home in there distance, the hill ahead of you, the hospital . . . — Map (db m91219) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Daniel K. Inouye
U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye (1924-2012) was a lifelong public servant. A veteran who nearly lost his life in brave service with the highly-decorated, all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team in World War II, has been recognized for his . . . — Map (db m91143) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Heart Mountain High School:Education in Camp
As you look through the site glass, you see a concrete records vault, the only remnant of the high school that stood on this ground. In early August 1942, the Heart Mountain project director hired Clifford D. Carter as superintendent and John . . . — Map (db m91194) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Heart Mountain Relocation Center Honor Roll and Flag Pole
More that 750 young men and women incarcerated during World War II at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, despite being forced by the government to live in wooden barracks surrounded by barbed wire, left to serve their country in the U.S. Armed . . . — Map (db m91608) HM WM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Heart Mountain Relocation Center Memorial
History After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, many parts of the West Coast were declared military defense zones. The government ordered the removal of all persons of Japanese ancestry and the War Relocation Authority was . . . — Map (db m91185) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Heart Mountain World War II Memorial
September 1985 This memorial plaque is dedicated to the more than 750 internees who left Heart Mountain to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II, and to the memory of the 15 Heart Mountaineers who gave their live for our country. . . . — Map (db m91188) HM WM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Heart Mountain, Wyoming - Fall 1943
Rooted in decades of anti-Japanese and anti-Asian prejudice, the internment of 120,000 Nisei, American citizens of Japanese descent, and Issei, Japanese resident aliens, was triggered by the bombing of Pearl Harbor in Dec. 7, 1941. Initiatives . . . — Map (db m91169) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Hospital Complex:Health Service In Relocation Center
Directly in front of you was the hospital complex. The structures remaining are the boiler house and chimney, two slabs that were warehouse foundations, one building that was the kitchen and dining room, and one building that was the ambulance . . . — Map (db m91171) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — M.P. Station, Guard Tower, Rail & Train Station
As you look through the site glass, to the left of the intersection of Highway 14A and Road 19 stood the Military Police complex and one of the guard towers. On the right side of Road 19 were the main gate and the train station. The Chicago, . . . — Map (db m91172) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Norman Y. Mineta
At this location, from 1942 to 1943, Norman Y. Mineta, Son of Kunisaku (Kay) and Kane Mineta and a U.S. Citizen, was interned by the United States Government. Harboring no bitterness, only an abiding love of his country, he . . . — Map (db m91139) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Relocation Center Support Facilities
As you look through the site glass, you see the hill where the water reservoir stood. Across Highway 14A was the water treatment plant and adjacent to the military police complex was the sewage treatment plant. Directly across the intersection in . . . — Map (db m91220) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Ralston — Swimming Hole:Recreation in Camp
As you look through the site glass, you see the camp swimming hole. After an internee Boy Scout drowned while swimming in the canal during the summer of 1943, the Administration ordered a large pit excavated just below the canal. The pit was lined . . . — Map (db m91180) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Wapiti — A Burning Need

The Shoshone National Forest provides a habitat for more Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep than any other national forest. Grazing on nutritious bunchgrasses, bighorn sheep evolved in open, high visibility habitats near steep, rocky cover, making it . . . — Map (db m89018) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Wapiti — Absaroka Volcanic FieldWyoming
Stretching across 9,000 square miles, the Absaroka Volcanic Field forms one of the largest volcanic fields in the continental United States. Between thirty-five to fifty-five million years ago volcanoes in the Yellowstone region erupted, depositing . . . — Map (db m87599) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Wapiti — Is This Forest Healthy?
Red to Dead Trees live and die by natural processes. As you look across the landscape, you may see red needles or dead trees. Natural events such as drought, windthrow, and old age add stress to trees. In some places, where fire has been . . . — Map (db m89032) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Wapiti — Protection Proves Profitable

This valley has sustained life for thousands of years. Early Native Americans were drawn here to hunt buffalo, elk, deer, moose, sheep and bear. It has always been considered a unique place. The establishment of the nation’s first park and . . . — Map (db m89027) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Wapiti — Shoshone National Forest
The Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway stretches 27.5 miles from the Shoshone National Forest boundary to Yellowstone National Park. Originally built in 1901, the byway spans the North Fork of the Shoshone River Valley and divides two vast wilderness areas: . . . — Map (db m89038) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Changing LandscapeMammoth Hot Springs Terraces
Scattered across this unusual landscape are hot springs – hot springs that are reshaping the mountain. Water, heated deep underground, rises to the surface. As it rises, the water percolates through buried limestone, dissolving calcium . . . — Map (db m88449) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Golden Opportunity / Mission 66 in Yellowstone / The Mission Continues
A Golden OpportunityWhen Yellowstone became the world’s first national park in 1872, only 300 people reached its borders.-----------------------------------------For decades, traveling to Yellowstone and other remote parks remained slow and . . . — Map (db m88730) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Sense of Community
The last of the structures built by the army (completed in 1913), the chapel added a finishing touch to the fort and was considered by far its most beautiful structure. The community held religious services in the troop mess hall, the post . . . — Map (db m87140) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Soldier’s Life
Here in Fort Yellowstone, a soldier lived with the rest of his company in the Troop Barracks (structure in front of you). A typical day began at 5:30 a.m. at the stable where the horses were fed and groomed. Activities could also include guard . . . — Map (db m87142) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Wildlife Paradise
Yellowstone’s vast northern range is home to an amazing array of mammals. This wildlife community is one of the largest and most diverse of any on Earth! While visiting Yellowstone, you may see some of these animals. Remember, they are wild and . . . — Map (db m88938) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — An Exploded Bay
West Thumb’s shoreline has suspiciously crater-like contours. Its underwater profile is dramatically deeper than the rest of Yellowstone Lake. Only a massive explosion could have formed West Thumb. Though the blowout occurred 125,000 years ago, . . . — Map (db m88422) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Artist PointGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
A Photographer's Canvas Artist Point offers a magnificent view of Lower Falls plunging 308 feet (93 meters). Framed by canyon walls, forest, and sky, the picturesque scene has been photographed countless times for more than a century. . . . — Map (db m45265) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Beauty and Chromatic Pools
Living Color The vivid colors of Beauty Pool’s basin and runoff channels are created by microscopic lifeforms. Incredibly, these organisms survive and thrive in an environment that would be lethal to us and most other living creatures. . . . — Map (db m88364) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Beehive Geyser
this geyser, named for its 4-foot high cone, resembles an old fashioned beehive. Though its cone is modest by comparison to others in the Upper Geyser Basin, Beehive is one of the most powerful and impressive geysers in Yellowstone. The cone acts as . . . — Map (db m46274) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Black Dragon’s Caldron
This mudpot roared into existence in 1948, blowing trees out by roots and forever changing this once quiet forested hillside. A park interpreter named the new feature for its resemblance to a darkly colored “demon of the backwoods.” For . . . — Map (db m88693) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Black Sand Basin
Black obsidian (volcanic glass) “sand” gives this geyser basin its name. Oranges, greens, and other colors in and around the hot springs come from thermophiles (heat-loving microorganisms). While you walk the trail, watch for one of . . . — Map (db m88865) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Brink of Lower FallsGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
Sculpting Lower Falls Reaching the Brink of Lower Falls overlook requires hiking a steep trail that winds down the canyon wall…a wall of hardened rhyolite lava…a wall exposed by the Yel1owstone River while excavating the canyon. . . . — Map (db m45293) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Brink of Upper FallsGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
Between a Rock and a Hard Place From the Brink of Upper Falls viewpoint you can witness the power of the Yellowstone River as you watch millions of gallons (liters) of water plunging 109 feet (33 meters). From the brink, notice the . . . — Map (db m45291) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Canyon Colors
Mineral stains mark the sites of hot springs and steam vents in the canyon walls. For thousands of years,upwardly percolating fluids have altered the chemistry of the rocks, turning them yellow, red, white, and pink. From the rim, the bright . . . — Map (db m45266) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Captive TouristsThe Nez Perce Encounter
During their fighting retreat toward freedom in Canada, the non-treaty Nez Perce passed directly through Yellowstone National Park in August, 1877. Their route followed this creek. When outriders encountered a party of sightseers camped nearby, the . . . — Map (db m39455) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Castle Geyser
The massive cone is a sign of old age. Eruption after eruption, probably for thousands of years, scalding water has deposited this silica mineral formation. By contrast, Old Faithful’s fledgling cone may only be a few hundred years old. Castle . . . — Map (db m88374) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Chance EncounterNez Perce War
Across the meadow, a fire burned in the campsite of nine tourists on the night of August 23, 1877. The Cowan party had unknowingly camped near hundreds of Nez Perce men, women, and children who were under violent pursuit by the United States Army. . . . — Map (db m86788) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Chittenden Memorial Bridge
General Hiram Martin Chittenden Corps of Engineers     United States Army 1858     -     1917 — Map (db m88149) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Churning Caldron
Frothing and fuming as heat and gas rise from Yellowstone’s magma chamber, this muddy pool churns and cooks. Shaken again and again by earthquakes, the temperature beneath it rises and falls, transforming Churning Caldron. Roiling or Boiling? . . . — Map (db m88689) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Cistern SpringLiving Color
Hot springs create different water temperature environments for living things. Cistern Spring’s brown, orange, and green colors represent species of visible algae and bacteria, each requiring a different temperature environment. Only a . . . — Map (db m89128) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Cooking Hillside
Shake, then Bake Covered by dense forest until 1978, this hillside changed dramatically after a swarm of earthquakes struck the area. In spite of being jolted again and again, the trees remained standing, but met their demise soon afterward . . . — Map (db m88682) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Crested PoolSuperheated Waters
Hot springs are the most numerous type of thermal feature in Yellowstone. More than 10,000 are scattered across Yellowstone’s 2 million acres, but few are as hot and as intensely colored as Crested Pool. Water temperatures within the pool often . . . — Map (db m88373) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Crime in Wonderland
From poachers to stagecoach robbers, soldiers were kept busy enforcing the law in Yellowstone. There were five stagecoach robberies in Yellowstone, with the last occurring on 1914. What is often considered the greatest stagecoach robbery of . . . — Map (db m87141) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Cutthroat
After the ice sheet on Yellowstone Lake breaks up in May and grinds downstream beneath Fishing Bridge, you can witness a spawning frenzy. Cutthroat trout lay millions of eggs in the riverbed gravel within sight of the bridge. Spawning season has a . . . — Map (db m88135) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Daisy Geyser
Daisy Geyser is part of an interconnected group of geysers and hot springs. Underground cracks and fissures allow water and heat to circulate between the various features in this group. When the activity of one feature affects the behavior of . . . — Map (db m88380) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Dragon's Mouth Spring
An unknown park visitor named this feature around 1912, perhaps due to the water that frequently surged from the cave like the lashing of a dragon's tongue. Until 1994, this dramatic wave-like action ofter splashed water as far as the boardwalk. The . . . — Map (db m46269) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — EchinusAcidic Geyser
Millions of spine-shaped deposits surround Echinus Geyser. Iron, arsenic, manganese, and aluminum are all found in the acidic fountain of water that showers the landscape. With each eruption, these metals help build miniature rust-colored sinter . . . — Map (db m89129) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Echinus Acidic Geyser
Millions of spine-shaped deposits surround Echinus Geyser. Iron, arsenic, manganese, and aluminum are all found in the acidic fountain of water that showers the landscape. With each eruption, these metals help build miniature rust-colored sinter . . . — Map (db m89130) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Elk RutThe Sound of Autumn
As the days grow short and temperatures dip, bull elk feel the nudge of autumn. Instinct and experience guide them. Ready to compete, bulls pierce the air with bugling – their distinctive mating calls. Gathering and Guarding a Harem . . . — Map (db m88847) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Emerald SpringThe Secret is Sulphur
A hot spring’s color often indicates the presence of minerals. In a clear blue pool, the water is absorbing all the colors of sunlight except one – blue, which is reflected back to our eyes. Here in Emerald Spring’s pool, another factor joins . . . — Map (db m88440) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fading Glory
Morning Glory Pool is losing its brilliant color. Through ignorance and vandalism, people have tossed objects into the hot spring, clogging its vent and lowering the temperature. Brown, orange, and yellow algae-like bacteria thrive in the cooler . . . — Map (db m88349) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fire – A Fundamental Force
Like wind, rain, and sunshine, fire is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Plants decompose very slowly in Yellowstone’s cool, dry environment. Fire speeds up this process. Wood and other organic material are turned into ash. Minerals and valuable . . . — Map (db m88912) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Forces of the Northern Range Self-Guiding Trail
A Special Place Yellowstone’s northern range is home to a large variety of plants and animals. It is unique – different from other areas in the park. What makes it different? • Elevations are 5,200 – 7,000 feet – lower than . . . — Map (db m88954) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fort Yellowstone
When Yellowstone was established in 1872, the fledgling park was viewed greedily by poachers, railroads, and mining interests. The nineteenth-century way of seeing wilderness as empty land on which to capitalize would need to change before these . . . — Map (db m87112) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fort Yellowstone     National Historic Landmark
This is the only point in the park where an extensive transformation of natural conditions by the work of man has been permitted. Yet, it was unavoidable here, and in yielding to this necessity, the effort has been made to provide a . . . — Map (db m87127) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — From Soldier to Ranger
The National Park Service Act was signed on August 25, 1916. About one month later on September 30th, twenty-three soldiers were discharged from the army to be hired by the civilian agency as the first rangers in Yellowstone. Included with the . . . — Map (db m87144) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fumaroles
Letting off Steam Listen intently for the hiss of steam escaping the mountain. Fumaroles are sometimes barely audible, but sometimes roar as steam rushes upward through narrow vents. during the 1800s, Roaring Mountain was, at times, heard four . . . — Map (db m45383) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — FumarolesHigh Heat and Low Water
The hottest of Yellowstone’s geothermal features are fumaroles (steam vents). Fumaroles in Norris Geyser Basin have measured up to 280°F (138°C). A plentiful water supply would help cool these features; however, steam vents are usually found on . . . — Map (db m88432) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Giant Geyser
When active, Giant Geyser is one of the largest in the world. Historic accounts describe Giant’s eruptions soaring to heights of 250 to 300 feet. However, recent eruptions have ranged from 200 to 250 feet. Giant Geyser displays cycles of activity . . . — Map (db m88352) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Gibbon Falls
Cascading to the Caldera This frothy veil of water plunges 84 feet (26 m), then tumbles toward the Yellowstone Caldera about ¼ mile (.4 km) downriver. As Gibbon Falls erodes the rock below, the waterfall forever grows higher and migrates . . . — Map (db m88339) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Glacial Boulder
The large boulder beside you was left by a glacier – the glacier that sculpted the broad valley you are standing in. A Cold Ride How did this boulder get here? Like many others scattered across Yellowstone, it was scraped from the . . . — Map (db m88935) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Grand GeyserWorld’s Tallest Predictable Geyser
Known for the height and beauty of its eruptions, Grand Geyser’s activity is linked with that of nearby geysers. An intricate sequence of events that takes place over 7 to 15 hours culminates in explosions of boiling water and steam from Grand’s . . . — Map (db m88369) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Grand ViewGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
Deep and Wide The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River is… • More than 1,000 feet deep in most places (305 m) • Up to 4,000 feet wide (1,219 m) • 20 miles long (32 km) • Carved from old rhyolitic lava flows • Thermally . . . — Map (db m45298) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Grizzly Fumarole
Changing with the Seasons All hydrothermal features change, but Grizzly Fumarole changes from day to day, and season to season, reflecting recent weather conditions. What is Hydrothermal? Hydro = Water       Thermal = Heat During dry . . . — Map (db m88698) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Grotto Geyser
Grotto is perhaps the most unusual of Yellowstone’s geysers. Geologists believe that hundreds (or thousands) of years ago, Grotto Geyser emerged in a stand of dead or dying trees and, through time, deposited layer upon layer of siliceous sinter . . . — Map (db m88445) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Guard Duty
Protecting Yellowstone’s wildlife and natural wonders was the primary aim of the army. An important part of this duty was managing the growing visitation to the park and watching for “shady characters.” Park roads were once aligned so . . . — Map (db m87139) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Hayden ValleyWhere the Buffalo Roam
The American bison (Bison bison) symbolizes the spirit of the West. Few other animals inspire such awe and reverence. Hayden Valley, with its broad expanse of grasses and sedges, has been a home to bison for thousands of years. Nearly driven . . . — Map (db m88482) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Inspiration PointGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
A Youthful Glow The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River was born thousands of years ago, but is till young in geologic time. After Yellowstone’s most recent icecap melted about 14,000 years ago, the Yellowstone River began . . . — Map (db m45301) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Land of LodgepolesLiving with Fire
Lodgepole pines thrive in Yellowstone’s harsh climate and thin volcanic soils. These hardy trees cover much of the park and depend on fire to help spread their seeds. Because fire are common in lodgepole forests, Yellowstone residents have learned . . . — Map (db m88862) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Leaping the Rapids
In June and July these rapids fill with cutthroat trout heading upstream to spawn near the lake outlet. Spawning is a life-and-death event; here at LeHardy Rapids you can witness the fierce energy it takes for the species to survive. Watch pools at . . . — Map (db m88346) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Life at the Blowdown
A Flourishing Forest Peering into the forest today, you may see signs of ranging storms. Ravaged by wind and later by the Fires of ’88, the forest here looked devastated. But lodgepole pines are well suited to Yellowstone’s harsh climate and . . . — Map (db m88319) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Life in a Fire Tower
Beginning in the early 1900s, fire towers were built across the nation to protect the forest resources from uncontrolled wildland fire. These towers were manned by rugged individuals who spent their days alone searching the horizon with . . . — Map (db m89351) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Life in the Fort
During the season (June, July, August, September), life at the post was always busy with fire patrol, guarding the thermal features, flirting with the maids of the hotels and camps, and going to dances. There were sports as well. Baseball was . . . — Map (db m87138) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Living on the Edge
At first glance, geyser basins may appear to be stark and lifeless places. Amazingly, they team with both microscopic and visible life year-round. Even the hottest thermal features contain tiny microbes that can live in one of earth’s most extreme . . . — Map (db m88342) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Living Thermometer
Can you imagine living in a geyser? Thermophiles – microorganisms that thrive in heat –are perfectly adapted to living in geysers and their runoff channels. Some live where temperatures are hottest, while others reside in cooler areas. . . . — Map (db m88434) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Lookout PointGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
Welcome to Lookout Point Lookout Point is popular for its lofty view. The trail to the overlook is about 145 yards (133 m) long, and includes 13 steps. A steep descent to Red Rock will take you to the North Rim's . . . — Map (db m45295) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Looks Can Be Deceiving
Bison seem lazy and docile grazing in the sun. They are massive and look as if they can hardly move. Do not be fooled. They are wild animals. They can spring to their feet in an instant if they feel threatened. They can leap over fences and run 35 . . . — Map (db m88859) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Madison RiverRibbon of Life
Twelve miles east, the waters of the Gibbon and Firehole Rivers join to form the Madison River. Flowing through the heart of this valley, rich waters nourish an abundance of wildlife. Trout eat their fill from bountiful insect hatches. Using keen . . . — Map (db m88863) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Mail Carrier’s Cabin
When Alden Roseborough accepted the Mail Carrier’s position in 1895, a long and rugged road awaited. The route – 100 miles round trip – took him from Mammoth Hot Springs through remote northern Yellowstone National Park to Cooke City, . . . — Map (db m87135) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Minute GeyserChoked by Ignorance
Minute Geyser’s eruptions have changed dramatically. Its larger west vent (right) is clogged with rocks tossed in by early visitors when the park’s main road was near this trail – passing within 70 feet (21 meters) of the geyser. Minute . . . — Map (db m88414) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Mission 66A Decade of Modernization
In the late 1950s, Canyon Village was created near the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. Its design and construction showcased a then modern-day plan to host a growing number of travelers. Following World War II, Americans longed for scenic . . . — Map (db m88453) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Mt. Washburn TrailLife Above Treeline
After a steady ascent through whitebark pine and fir forest the trail reaches alpine tundra – a wind-scoured world of stunted trees and briefly blooming wildflowers. Mt. Washburn’s steep slopes and low groundcover are ideal habitat for . . . — Map (db m89353) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Mud Geyser
Imagine walking on a densely forested trail to arrive at Mud Geyser – a trail once shaded by trees now criss-crossing the ground around you. Before 1978, Mud Geyser was hidden by forest except from a platform beyond this point! A Once and . . . — Map (db m88686) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Mud Volcano
Explosive Change In 1870, explorers stood in awe as Mud Volcano spewed mud into the treetops, shaking the ground with each eruption. Two years later it was a pool of bubbling, muddy water. Mud Volcano has blown itself apart!

While returning . . . — Map (db m46272) HM

Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Murky Past . . . Promising Future
Upon its establishment in 1872, approximately 48 percent of Yellowstone’s waters were fishless. This did not go unnoticed. Stocking the park’s waters for anglers became a priority. The result? Over 310 million native and nonnative fish – some . . . — Map (db m88393) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Norris Geyser Basin
Beautiful and Bizarre As you walk through Norris Geyser Basin, you may feel as if you are encountering another world. In the basin—far below the towering peaks of the Gallatin Mountains—water accumulates underground. Heated . . . — Map (db m45316) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Norris Geyser BasinPorcelain Basin
In this raw, acidic land where iron and arsenic abound, thermophiles and extremophiles – microorganisms that live in heat and other extremes – inhabit geysers and hot springs. Many pools are opalescent, or cloudy. Look for murky . . . — Map (db m88437) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Norris Geyser BasinPorcelain Landscape
The sweeping view before you is named for its porcelain-like appearance – smooth sinter deposited by centuries of thermal activity, continually glazed by minerals, hot water, and living microorganisms called thermophiles. Norris Note • . . . — Map (db m88439) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Off the HookHistoric Fishing Bridge
Before Fishing Bridge closed to fishing in 1973, visitors fished here elbow to elbow – their hooks snagging each other as well as passing motorists. Regulations were changed when park managers realized that fishing from the bridge was . . . — Map (db m88134) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Orange Spring Mound
Deep Origins 1. Yellowstone’s volcano heats water deep underground. 2. Under great pressure, the water percolates upward through buried limestone, dissolving a mineral called calcium carbonate. 3. Above ground, the water begins to cool . . . — Map (db m88452) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Petrified TreeSubtropical Yellowstone
This petrified redwood is a clue to a warmer, damper, more violent Yellowstone landscape. Anatomically the trunk is indistinguishable from present-day redwoods in California. When a chain of volcanoes erupted here in Eocene times 50 million years . . . — Map (db m87146) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Plateau of Fire
The cliff in front of you shows a flood of lava in cross-section. It may be difficult to imagine the forested Yellowstone Plateau covered with bubbling, hissing lava, but the rocks contain the evidence. Up close, you can see that the dark rhyolite . . . — Map (db m88409) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Porcelain SpringsInfluencing a Landscape
The milky color of the mineral deposited here inspired the naming of Porcelain Basin and Porcelain Springs. The mineral, siliceous sinter, is brought to the surface by hot water and forms a sinter “sheet” over this flat area as the . . . — Map (db m88436) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Porkchop Geyser
The upended rocks before you are the result of Porkchop Geyser’s hydrothermal explosion in 1989. Porkchop’s vent failed to relieve a surge in underground pressure; it exploded creating another chapter in the geyser’s dramatic history of change. . . . — Map (db m88410) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Porkchop Geyser
Shaped like a porkchop, this quiet spring was named “Dr. Morey’s Porkchop” in 1961. But this calm spring held many surprise, beginning with an eruption in 1971. For the next 14 years, Porkchop occasionally erupted through its tiny . . . — Map (db m88411) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Riverside Geyser
Across the Firehole River is Riverside Geyser, one of the most predictable and consistent geysers in Yellowstone. Beginning an hour or two before an eruption, water pours over the cone’s edge, and splashing and bubbling become more visible. Then, . . . — Map (db m88386) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Road Builders
In 1883, when Lieutenant Dan C. Kingman and the Army Corps of Engineers arrived, the road situation was dismal. When the Corps left 35 year later, there were 400 miles of stable, secure roads which had been designed with the intent of allowing . . . — Map (db m87117) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Roaring Mountain
Living Landscape Amid Roaring Mountain's steam and sulfur-rich gases, microscopic organisms are hard at work. This barren slope, inhospitable to humans, is the perfect home for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Billions upon billions of these . . . — Map (db m45382) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Rut in HaydenBison Romance
Grunts, rumbles, and roars vibrate the air. The summer day sizzles with energy as hundreds of bison mill restlessly. It seems chaotic, but there is a reason for the agitation. One of nature’s most spectacular reproduction rituals is in motion. . . . — Map (db m88849) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Seasons of the Range
A Time of Renewal Northern range wildlife grow strong in spring after a long, cold winter. Melting snow and rain turn the landscape green and lush. Bears emerge hungry from their winter dens, eager to feed on roots and grasses, . . . — Map (db m88915) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Shifting Ground
Before the earthquake on June 30, 1975, the observation platform extended one hundred feet farther into the canyon. The main tremor and numerous aftershocks measuring 6.1 on the Richter scale shattered a portion of this cliff, tumbling it into the . . . — Map (db m45302) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Snow-Movers
For months on end their food is buried. Herbivores – plant-eaters – face the same relentless winter fate: adapt or starve. To reach sedges and dry grass, bison swing their huge heads back and forth, clearing away the drifts. Fields . . . — Map (db m89124) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — SolfataraUnstable Ground
This hillside is venting. As sulfuric acid, gasses, and steam escape, they create a barren and very dangerous landscape called a solfatara: scalding mud and steam are often barely covered by hot, crumbling, decomposed rock. Unlike other . . . — Map (db m88435) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Steamboat GeyserLearning to Love the Unpredictable
When Steamboat Geyser erupts, it can rocket a column of scalding water 90-120 meters into the air – two to three times the average height of Old Faithful. Steam roars for twenty-four hours after. Odds are against your witnessing this drama, . . . — Map (db m88323) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Still Venting After All These Years
The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River slices through an ancient hydrothermal basin. The basin developed in rhyolitic lava and ash that flowed into the Yellowstone Caldera about 500,000 years ago. The river carved this spectacular canyon through . . . — Map (db m88959) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Sulphur Caldron
Ten times more acidic than lemon juice, Sulphur Caldron sits on the edge of one of the most active areas of Yellowstone's buried volcano. Sulphur-rich gasses rise furiously here, filling Sulphur Caldron with sulfuric acid. Incredibly, this muddy . . . — Map (db m46268) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Forest that Needs Fire
Yellowstone’s most common tree is the lodgepole pine. Miles and miles of these tall, straight trees grow close together. Lodgepole pines forests need fire to survive. It helps control disease and insects, and fire is essential for a new generation . . . — Map (db m88911) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone — [Artist Point]
The canyon varies from 800 to 1200 feet in depth and from 1500 to 4000 feet in width. Its length is about 24 miles. The upper 2½ miles is the most colorful section. Hot spring activity has continued through the ages altering the lava rock to . . . — Map (db m41398) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone
The canyon varies from 800 to 1200 feet in depth and from 1500 to 4000 feet in width. Its length is about 24 miles. The upper 2½ miles is the most colorful section. Hot spring activity has continued through the ages altering the lava rock to . . . — Map (db m45299) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Land Tells the Story
The rocky outcropping in front of you tells part of a violent story of Yellowstone’s volcano – one of the largest volcanoes on Earth. About two million years ago Yellowstone’s volcano – so enormous that it is called a “super . . . — Map (db m88930) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Madison Elk Herd
From an elk's perspective, this valley offers everything needed for year-round survival. Food is abundant. These meadows become snow-free relatively early and stay lush longer into summer. During May-June calving season, nearby lodgepole . . . — Map (db m46262) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The National Park System
The national park idea is often referred to as one of America's greatest contributions to world culture. America's natural and cultural heritage—its very character and soul—is preserved in over 360 units of the National Park System. . . . — Map (db m45314) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Norris AreaOrientation
Norris Geyser Basin You are close to a world of heat and gases where microorganisms live in such massive numbers they add color to the landscape. This strange, beautiful place is on the edge of a giant volcano-the Yellowstone Volcano-one of . . . — Map (db m45349) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Parade Ground
Gathering place, training ground, site of ceremonies and parades – the drill field was the focal point of daily life at Fort Yellowstone. Each day began early with a bugler sounding reveille. Gradually, the fort came to life, and another . . . — Map (db m87115) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Post Exchange
At the Post Exchange, a soldier with free time could spend it in the gymnasium or bowling alley, or could play cards and drink beer. There may also have been a billiards table, and movies were shown once a week. The building was informally known . . . — Map (db m87143) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Towers in the Air
Tower Fall is the story of two rocks: easily eroded rocks and rocks that are resistant to erosion. Rock at the brink and underlying the waterfall is a hard volcanic rock. Erosion at the base of the fall causes the upstream migration of the fall. . . . — Map (db m88305) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Trembling Aspens
Roots of Survival The secret of an aspen grove lies hidden beneath the ground. Aspens rarely grow from seeds but spring up abundantly from the roots of their parent. These young shoots are connected to each other underground by an extensive . . . — Map (db m88920) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Uncle Tom’s PointGrand Canyon of the Yellowstone River
Welcome to Uncle Tom’s Point Uncle Tom’s Trail For a memorable descent into the canyon, follow Uncle Tom’s Trail. From there, you can sense the power of Lower Falls as the Yellowstone River thunders over the brink, . . . — Map (db m45272) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Uncle Tom’s Trail
Shortly after 1900, “Uncle” Tom Richardson took visitors down into the Canyon along this trail. Originally with 528 steps and rope ladders; it now descends 328 steps or about ¾ of the way down in to the Canyon for an excellent view of . . . — Map (db m88901) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Upper Falls of the Yellowstone River
A waterfall is a clue that you are standing on a geologic crossroads. A waterfall forms in a river channel where harder rocks meet softer rocks that erode more easily and quickly. Here, volcanic and hydrothermal activity have created the . . . — Map (db m45275) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Volcanic Landscape
You are inside a caldera of one of the largest volcanoes in the world! The volcano has erupted at least three times, and Yellowstone is full of signs that volcanic activity is still very much alive below ground.

On the Rise Magma is moving and . . . — Map (db m46265) HM

Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Volcanic Landscape
The high cliffs around you were created after the last volcanic eruption in the Yellowstone region, about 630,000 years ago. The powerful eruption ejected ash as far away as Nebraska and Texas, expelling magma from an underground chamber more than . . . — Map (db m88343) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Waterfall Makers
Here the Yellowstone River plunges 308 feet over the Lower Falls. Hot springs have weakened the rock jut downstream, where you might see several geysers spouting into the river. As falling water pounds the thermally softened rock, it continues to . . . — Map (db m45297) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — What’s Blooming?
Flowers are scattered throughout Yellowstone’s northern landscape from April through September. During winter they lie dormant, waiting to burst into color. Several factors determine what you might see, and where. • How hot or cold has it been . . . — Map (db m88926) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — White Dome Geyser
White Dome Geyser’s beautifully shaped cone is many centuries old, and is still growing with each eruption. For hundreds of years, thermal water has been building the cone that you see today – one of the largest in Yellowstone. Formation of . . . — Map (db m88390) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Why is there no fishing from Fishing Bridge?
In 1902, the first bridge was built across the outlet of Yellowstone Lake. By 1914, its official name was “Fishing Bridge.” Today’s bridge with walkways was built in 1937. Fishing Bridge had become a popular fishing spot for park . . . — Map (db m88136) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Wilderness ArchitectureFishing Bridge Museum
With massive boulders up to five feet in diameter, the museum’s lower walls appear to rise out of a rocky outcrop. Other structural details – log beams, wooden shingles – relate to the surrounding forest. Wildlife exhibits featuring . . . — Map (db m88467) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Wolf Tracks
Gray wolves (Canis lupus) are the largest member of the canine family. They are well suited to Yellowstone where winters are long and severe. Wolves move easily over the snow on their large paws, their thick fur keeping them warm. Wolves . . . — Map (db m88906) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone has been designated a U.S. Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site, and is one of the largest national parks in the lower 48 states. Its boundaries protect over 10,000 geysers,hot springs, mudpots, and steam vents-the earth's . . . — Map (db m45315) HM

178 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement