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First Government House Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Coughlin, July 21, 2017
First Government House Marker
Bermuda, St George’s, St. George’s — First Government House
The back garden of the First Government House was on this site. In 1700, Samuel Day, governor, erected this building. For more than a century, it was in possession of the Tucker Family. During the American Civil War it was occupied by the agent of . . . — Map (db m106350) HM
Bermuda, St George’s, St. George’s — Midshipman Richard Sutherland Dale
In this building then known as Stennett’s Hotel died on February 22, 1815 in his twenty-first year, Midshipman Richard Sutherland Dale, of the American frigate, President, severely wounded when that vessel, commanded by Commodore S. Decatur, . . . — Map (db m106348) HM
Bermuda, St George’s, St. George’s — Settlement of Bermuda
1609   -   1909 In commemoration of the settlement of these islands on the 28th of July 1609 and in honor of Admiral Sir George Somers Kt. at whose instance largely the settlement was effected. This memorial has been erected out of a grant made by . . . — Map (db m106353) HM
Bermuda, St George’s, St. George’s — Thomas Moore
1779 – 1858 Irish Poet and Lyrist Byron’s Friend That little bay, where winding in from ocean’s rude and angry din. The billows missed the shore, and then flow calmly to the deep again. — Map (db m106355) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailFlag Waving at Fawn Street — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6208) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailBarricade at Jones Falls Bridge — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6209) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailCombat on Pratt Street — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface) On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m71978) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead
Within this cemetery is buried Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead Born New Bern, N.C. Feb. 16, 1817 Died at Gettysburg, Pa. July 3, 1863 Where men under his command made the farthest northern advance by any Southern troops Captain U.S. Army . . . — Map (db m21366) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — British Bomb
Fired by the British Naval Forces during the bombardment of this fort Sept. 13-14, 1814 when by the light of “Bombs bursting in air” the National Anthem – The Star Spangled Banner had its birth. — Map (db m10882) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Evolution of Fort McHenry
After the Battle of Baltimore in 1814, Fort McHenry continued as a military post for more than a hundred years. The U.S. Army constructed buildings outside the star fort and modified existing structures to serve the needs of the time. During the . . . — Map (db m10881) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mortars vs. Guns
When the British attacked in 1814, guns of this type – but larger – were fired from the ramparts and the water batteries near the riverbank. They kept the British warships from entering Baltimore Harbor, but they could not shoot far . . . — Map (db m10885) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812
Among the illustrious men interred within this enclosure who assisted in the achievement of National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812 are the following Samuel Chase, 1741 – 1811, Signer of the Declaration of Independence . . . — Map (db m21364) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Outer Battery
This complex of earthen embankments and masonry structures has been the site of Fort McHenry’s heaviest artillery since about 1840. The U.S. Army kept this battery heavily armed during the Civil War to discourage any Confederate attempts to take . . . — Map (db m10891) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Remember 1814
Fort McHenry protected the water approaches to Baltimore for more than a hundred years, but was attacked only once. On September 13-14, 1814, British ships fired rockets and mortars at the fort for twenty-five hours. Fort McHenry withstood the . . . — Map (db m10875) HM
Mississippi (Alcorn County), Corinth — Corinth
Began 1854 as Cross City. Proximity to Tennessee River and the railroads made it of great strategic value during Civil War. Battle of Corinth fought here, Oct. 3-4, 1862. — Map (db m21305) HM
Mississippi (Alcorn County), Corinth — Grant’s Headquarters
Site of hq. of Gen. Ulysses Simpson Grant in June, 1862. In mid-July Grant removed to plantation home of F. E. Whitfield, Sr., about 1 mi. S. of Corinth. — Map (db m21157) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — Absecon Lighthouse
Over the years, these grounds contained a variety of buildings that supported the Lighthouse operation. As you look around, envision the oil storage house with a greenhouse and sheds behind it, a square brick building housing the Weather Bureau to . . . — Map (db m46297) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — Assistant Keepers’ DwellingAbsecon Lighthouse
When Absecon Lighthouse was first lit in 1857, a principal keeper and assistant keeper lived on site with their families. The dwelling for an assistant keeper was built during the original Lighthouse construction. Interior alterations in 1887 . . . — Map (db m46288) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — Keeper’s DwellingAbsecon Lighthouse
The light from Absecon Lighthouse first beamed out across the Atlantic Ocean in 1857. At that time, the Lighthouse consisted of the original keeper’s dwelling, a thirty-foot connecting passageway and the tower. In 1903, adding a two-story addition . . . — Map (db m46304) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — Lighthouse HistoryAbsecon Lighthouse
The ocean waters off Absecon Inlet were considered some of the most deadly along the East Coast. Between 1847 and 1856, at least sixty-four ocean-going ships were lost off the coast of Absecon Beach. Dr. Jonathan Pitney, who promoted the development . . . — Map (db m46273) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — The Life-Saving StationAbsecon Lighthouse
By 1872, the first life-saving station was in operation on the corner of the Lighthouse property. This simple building, with some periodic renovations, served until the second, larger and more ornate station was constructed in 1884. The new . . . — Map (db m46289) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Atlantic City — The Whaling Bark StaffordAbsecon Lighthouse
Before construction of Absecon Lighthouse, many ships and many lives were lost off the coast of Absecon Island. Even though the beam from this light lessened these losses, other disasters plagued seagoing vessels. The anchor you see here, weighing . . . — Map (db m46291) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — A Pane in the Glass FactoryWharton State Forest
In the 1840s, Batsto’s iron industry was failing due to competition from new iron industries using coal and iron ore (magnetite) rather than charcoal and bog ore (limonite). Looking for another industry to keep Batsto profitable, Jesse Richards . . . — Map (db m76154) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — Auxiliary Power System
. . . — Map (db m76162) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — Bog OreLimonite – Fe2O3-3H2O
Ore of this type was used in the Batsto Furnace. It can still be found in the coves, swamps and bogs of the Pine Barrens. — Map (db m76160) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — Ore Boat or Barge
This boat is typical of the barges used to carry bog iron ore to the Batsto Furnace. It is estimated to be 150 years old and is 43 ft. long, with an 11 ft. beam. The boat was excavated from the north side of the Batsto Dam in 1957. — Map (db m76159) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — Swimming the Ladder to SuccessWharton State Forest
While the Batsto Dam provided power to a once prospering village, it halted the natural migration of spawning fish. The Batsto River Fishway Project provides a pathway over the dam. This project improves the aquatic ecosystem and provides increased . . . — Map (db m76157) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — Wagon
Although the exact date and manufacturer of this wagon are not known, it is possible that it was made by the Auburn Wagon Works in Martinsburg, WV around 1900. Wagons were used to transport goods both on the farm and to local markets, boat landings . . . — Map (db m76163) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Hammonton — William K. Phillis War Memorial
All Wars Memorial in honor of Veterans of all Wars who served and gave their lives in an effort to protect our country and to preserve out freedom justice and democracy. Dedicated as the William K. Phillis War Memorial World War II Korean War . . . — Map (db m76169) WM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — 3rd Battalion Gloucester County Militia
In honor of the men of the 3rd Battalion Gloucester County Militia Col. Richard Somers – Commanding Killed in Action Pvt. Forrest Bellangy (Killed at Trenton #2) Pvt. John Cain (Murdered while POW in Tuckerton) Lt. John Lucas (Killed in . . . — Map (db m76164) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Battle of Chestnut Neck
In honor of the Brave Patriots of the Revolutionary War who defended their liberties and their homes in a battle fought near this site October 6, 1778 ---------- Dedicated October 6, 1911 Lower Plaque: Erected by the State of New Jersey . . . — Map (db m10811) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — British Anchor
This anchor, believed to be from a British Merchant ship captured by Privateers and sunk during the Battle of Chestnut Neck, October 6, 1778 Has been donated to the Col. Richard Somers Chapter, New Jersey Society, Sons of the American Revolution by . . . — Map (db m76165) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Franklin Inn
Eighteenth century inn possibly built 1750 One time home of Sea Captain and privateer Micajah Smith — Map (db m10869) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Meeting House
In 1800, Micajah Smith built a Methodist Church on this site. Smith, a Revolutionary privateer captain, is buried here. — Map (db m10870) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Privateers1776 – 1783
In honor of the “Privateers” who sailed and fought for American Independence “1776 – 1783” “Captains”                    “Ships” Samuel Allen John Badcock                  Rainbow John . . . — Map (db m40339) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Ship’s Rib
Thought to have been sunk during the Battle of Chestnut Neck, October 6, 1778. Recovered during extreme low tide, 1971. — Map (db m76167) HM
New Jersey (Atlantic County), Port Republic — Welcome to Port Republic, New Jersey
The first settlement in what is now known as Atlantic County was made at Chestnut Neck, on the west bank of the Mullica River, near where the village of Port Republic is now located. In 1637, John Mullica sailed up the river that took his name, . . . — Map (db m76179) HM
New York (Albany County), Cohoes — Van Schaick Island
Military encampment   1777 Here, in the days leading up to the Battles of Saratoga, 5,000 – 8,000 Continental soldiers were garrisoned. — Map (db m37454) HM
New York (Albany County), Cohoes — Van Schaick Mansion
In 1777, this mansion was the headquarters for the Northern Department of the Continental Army, and the site where the victorious Saratoga Campaign was planned. Revolutionary War Heritage Trail — Map (db m37455) HM
New York (Albany County), Cohoes — Van Schaick MansionRevolutionary War Heritage Trail
The plans for the Battle of Saratoga were drawn up in this house in the summer of 1777, when the American Army was headquartered here. That April General Philip Schuyler and 5,000 troops retreated from Fort Edward in advance of Burgoyne’s superior . . . — Map (db m37457) HM
New York (Albany County), Glenmont — This is the Capital DistrictHistoric New York
          The Capital District has long been important as a trading post, military objective and governmental center. Located near the juncture of the Hudson and Mohawk rivers, Albany has been the “crossroads” of the northeast since . . . — Map (db m56854) HM
New York (Albany County), Menands — Historic Albany Rural CemeteryEst. 1841
Burial site of Pres. Arthur, governors, statesmen and private citizens. Noted for it’s natural beauty, sculptures & architecture. — Map (db m37463) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Alamance — First Battle of the Revolution
[ Rear of Monument ] Here was fought the Battle of Alamance between the British and the Regulators ------------- [ Right of Monument ] Liberty [ Left of Monument ] 1880 — Map (db m33797) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Alamance — The Battle of the Alamance
The first battle of the Revolutionary War, was fought in Orange County, North Carolina May 16th, 1771. [ Right of Monument ] 1771 – 81             1901 James Hunter “General” of the Regulators. “The country is as . . . — Map (db m33799) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Occaneechi in the ServicePiedmont Indians in the Civil War
When North Carolina passed laws in 1833 to restrict the rights of free blacks; they also limited the rights of Indians. In old Orange (later Alamance) County, many Occaneechi Indians including Dixon Corn, Jesse Jeffries, Enoch Jones, and Andrew . . . — Map (db m58335) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 60 — Tryon’s Camp
Before and after the battle of Alamance, the militia of Governor William Tryon camped nearby, along Alamance Creek, May 13-19, 1771. — Map (db m37373) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Biglerville — Biglerville
Bendersville – 4 Biglerville Named for Gov. William Bigler Founded 1817 — Map (db m64409) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Biglerville — October 24, 1794
George Washington returning from expedition to quell Whiskey Insurrection spent the night ¼ mile west of here at Russell’s Tavern — Map (db m67676) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Biglerville — Russell’s Tavern
- This is the original building - George Washington spent the night here Oct. 24, 1794. — Map (db m64297) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Cashtown — Gettysburg Campaign
Crossing South Mountain from Chambersburg, Gen. Hill's Corps of Lee's army assembled here on June 29-30, 1863. On July 1, his advance guard moved up from near Marsh Creek and met Union Troops west of Gettysburg. — Map (db m5814) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “ . . . I Am Going To Die” Saint Francis Xavier Roman Catholic Church
Erected in 1853, this church served as a field hospital during and after the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. While the church was substantially altered in 1925, much of the original Civl War era structure remains intact. Within its walls some 200 . . . — Map (db m65783) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “ . . . in less than half an hour . . . ”
The original German Reformed Church located here in 1814, served as a “Union brick church” with the town’s Lutheran congregation until 1848. The core of the present building, erected in 1851, was newly refurbished at the time of the . . . — Map (db m65780) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “. . . your sister is dead.”
On the morning of July 1st, Gettysburg resident Jennie Wade and her family fled their town home to this brick double house shared by her sister Georgia McClellan, to distance themselves from the fighting. The Union retreat to Cemetery Hill soon . . . — Map (db m37616) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “… the battle itself proved a relief.”
In 1863 this was the home of James and Catherine Foster and their daughter, Catherine. Prior to the battle the town was cut off from communications, and rumors of approaching “Rebels” and the whereabouts of the Union army prompted the . . . — Map (db m16353) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “bullets . . . rattling against our hospital . . . ”
The High Street or “Common” School was Gettysburg’s first consolidated public school building. Prior to its erection in 1857 classes were held in individual buildings, often the home of the teacher. Like the rest of the town’s public . . . — Map (db m65781) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “I can see them yet . . . ”
This building was the home of the James Pierce family during the Battle of Gettysburg. Tillie Pierce, a 15 year old school girl at the time, provided a vivid account of events from those days. The alarm that “The Rebels Are Coming!” . . . — Map (db m65775) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — “The National Homestead at Gettysburg”
This building was constructed in 1869 as a dormitory for “The National Homestead at Gettysburg,” a school for soldiers’ orphans established in 1866 in the brick building to your right. Among its first students were Alice, Frank and . . . — Map (db m37620) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Family Who Would Not Leave Their Home
When the Eleventh Corps took over the farm to serve as a hospital, the Spangler family was forced to live in just one of the six rooms of their home. Wounded soldiers and medical staff occupied the other rooms. One noted patient who was treated in . . . — Map (db m78900) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Farm Transformed by War
The barnyard and fields in front of you filled with wounded men and medical supplies in the days and weeks after the battle. Pvt. Justus Silliman, 17th Connecticut Infantry, wrote “All the hospital tents have been put up and are filled, . . . — Map (db m78895) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Herd of Modest SizeEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
If I can, from time to time, add an animal . . . I can in this manner accumulate . . . a future herd of modest size.           President Eisenhower The farm grew as the herd grew. Originally housed in the bank barn (to your . . . — Map (db m64397) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Hospital Under Fire
As the threshing floor in front of you filled with wounded, W. R. Kiefer, 153rd Pennsylvania, noted, “The maimed were placed with heads next [to] the bays and middle partition (of the threshing floor) leaving a passageway at the feet of . . . — Map (db m78897) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — a pathway to safety
Members of the beaten Union 11th Corps fled pursuing Confederates along this portion of Stratton Street in the late afternoon of July 1, 1863, seeking the protection of friendly lines on Cemetery Hill, a quarter mile beyond the crest in the . . . — Map (db m37625) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Temporary Resting Place
The field in front of you contained the hospital graveyard where some 185 Union and 20 Confederate soldiers were buried. Some of Spangler’s own wood supplies were used to make coffins for these soldiers and even a fence around the graveyard itself. . . . — Map (db m78898) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — A Union General Escapes Capture
In 1863, this building to your right, was the home and cabinetmaker’s shop of Henry Garlach and family. Cut off during the Union retreat to Cemetery Hill, General Alexander Schimmelfennig was able to avoid capture by the Confederates, when he hid . . . — Map (db m6176) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Adam Butt Farm & SchoolhouseCivil War Hospital
Adam Butt Farm & Schoolhouse Wilcox & Wright Brigade July, 1863 — Map (db m64319) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Ankonian has been invaluable. – President EisenhowerEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
Here in the bull pens and breeding shed, Eisenhower’s plans for the next generation of cattle unfolded. Much of the herd’s success rested on Ankonian 3551. From his pen (on your left), Ankonian served as principal bull from 1956 to 1965. But . . . — Map (db m64402) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Annoying “ . . . the enemy very seriously ”
Confederate sharpshooters in this area built a barricade across Baltimore Street at the intersection with Breckenridge Street to gain an open field of fire towards the Federal troops on Cemetery Hill. From behind this barricade and from windows of . . . — Map (db m65779) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Armistead Death Site
Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, CSA, died here on July 5, 1863 of wounds received in Pickett’s Charge on July 3. This summer kitchen was part of the U.S. Army’s 11th Corps Field Hospital, located here on the George Spangler farm. This plaque is . . . — Map (db m65734) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Baltimore Street Facade
341 Baltimore well represents the evolutionary style of many Gettysburg buildings. This three story front building, built in the 1890’s, replaced the original one story wooden structure that stood during the battle and dates back to the 1820’s. The . . . — Map (db m75640) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Barnyard DiplomacyEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
Dad preferred to take visitors over to the show barn to show his ribbons. Dad would climb into the corral with his bull and poke him in the rump with his shotgun until the bull would stand up. The Secret Service were petrified, but didn’t dare . . . — Map (db m64405) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Catherine Guinn FarmCivil War Hospital
Catherine Guinn Farm ♣ Second Corps July 2-3, 1863 — Map (db m64348) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Christian Byers FarmCivil War Hospital
Christian Byers Farm July-August, 1863 — Map (db m64318) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Civil War Soldiers in the Great Conewago Cemetery
In memory of the soldiers of the War of the Rebellion interred in the Great Conewago Cemetery Robert Bell                          Major, 21st Pa. Cav. Boreas Deatrick                   K Co., 184th Pa. Peter Decker                       F Co., . . . — Map (db m64711) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Col. Strong Vincent
Col. Strong Vincent fell here com’g 3d Brig. 1st Div. 5th Corp July 2nd 1863 — Map (db m64360) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Confederate Sharpshooter?
“…some mother may yet be patiently waiting for the return of her boy, whose bones lie bleaching, unrecognized and alone, between the rocks at Gettysburg.” Alexander Gardner Civil War photographer In front of you is the setting of . . . — Map (db m5809) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Confederate Stronghold
In the afternoon of July 1st, 1863, after Union troops retreated south to Cemetery Hill, this 2½ story brick house was occupied by Confederate sharpshooters. Catherine Sweney and daughter, Lizzie, residents of the house, fled to safety. The . . . — Map (db m6174) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Daniel Lady FarmCivil War Hospital
Daniel Lady Farm Ewell’s Second Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64345) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Daniel Sheaffer FarmCivil War Hospital
Daniel Sheaffer Farm Gen. Sickles’ Leg Amputated July, 1863 — Map (db m64306) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Dwight D. Eisenhower
The future President of the U.S., General of the Army, and Supreme Commander in Europe in WW II lived in this house with his wife Mamie and infant son Icky in the spring and summer of 1918. An Army captain, he was then commanding Camp Colt at . . . — Map (db m6179) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Edward McPherson FarmCivil War Hospital
Edward McPherson Farm First Corps July 5, 1863 — Map (db m64299) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Follow in the FootstepsEisenhower National Historic Park
When my father was president, he developed the habit of bringing visiting world leaders to the farm. Such informality, he reasoned, would make them feel at home.John Eisenhower Walk in the footsteps of presidents, prime ministers and kings as . . . — Map (db m37554) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Food Preservation of the Past
You are now standing near the Spangler’s original smokehouse, more than 160 years old. Although several changes have been made over the decades, such as the tin roof, a vast majority of the original structure still survives. Smokehouses had been . . . — Map (db m78902) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Francis Bream Black Horse TavernCivil War Hospital
Francis Bream Black Horse Tavern McLaw’s Division July, 1863 — Map (db m64317) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Franklin Street “Colored” School 1884-1932
On this corner stood the only building built for the sole purpose of educating the Colored children of the Borough of Gettysburg. In 1834 Pennsylvania mandated public education. On September 19, 1934, citizens of Gettysburg met and chose six . . . — Map (db m75467) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — George Bushman FarmCivil War Hospital
George Bushman Farm ★ Twelfth Corps July 2 – August 5, 1863 — Map (db m65738) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — George Spangler FarmCivil War Hospital
George Spangler Farm ☽ Eleventh Corps July – August, 1863 — Map (db m65735) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Gettysburg Campaign
The Battle of Gettysburg began here the morning of July 1, 1863, when Union cavalry scouts under Gen. Buford met Gen. Hill's army advancing from the west. Arrival of Gen. Ewell's army that afternoon drove Union troops to south of the town. — Map (db m5810) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Great Conewago Presbyterian ChurchCivil War Hospital
Great Conewago Presbyterian Church Dressing Station and Burial Site July 2 and 3, 1863 — Map (db m64341) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Guest House Railings
Railings removed from Mrs. Eisenhower’s girlhood home 750 Lafayette St., Denver, Colo. — Map (db m64412) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Henry Spangler FarmCivil War Hospital
Henry Spangler Farm ★ Twelfth Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64322) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — I shall leave the place better than I found it.Eisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
The fields in front of you demonstrate Eisenhower’s skill in farming. Using a system of crop rotation and contour plowing, Eisenhower slowly improved the productivity of the land. To prevent soil erosion and water run-off, fields were plowed . . . — Map (db m64400) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Isaac Lightner FarmCivil War Hospital
Isaac Lightner Farm ☽ Eleventh Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64307) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — J. Hummelbaugh FarmCivil War Hospital
J. Hummelbaugh Farm ● First   &   ♣ Second Corps July 2-3, 1863 — Map (db m37955) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Jacob Grass HotelCivil War Hospital
Jacob Grass Hotel July 2, 1863 — Map (db m64343) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Jacob Kime FarmCivil War Hospital
Jacob Kime Farm July 1863 — Map (db m65743) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Jacob Swisher FarmCivil War Hospital
Jacob Swisher Farm Hays’ Division ♣ Second Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64353) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Jacob Weikert FarmCivil War Hospital
Jacob Weikert Farm ♦ Third & ✠ Fifth Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64326) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Jennie Wade Birthplace
In this modest weatherboard house, constructed ca. 1820, Mary Virginia “Jennie” Wade was born on May 21, 1843. Wade, the second of six children of James and Mary Filby Wade, spent her childhood here, attending local schools and helping . . . — Map (db m8169) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — John L. Burns
Citizen Hero Patriot was in the Battle of Gettysburg July 1st 1863 He joined this church Jan. 28th 1866 — Map (db m65785) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Josiah Benner FarmCivil War Hospital
Josiah Benner Farm Union Gen. Barlow Treated July 1-3, 1863 — Map (db m64303) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — July 1, 1863
General Reynolds was the first Union General killed in the Battle of Gettysburg. He was carried by aides to this house. — Map (db m64296) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Leonard Bricker FarmCivil War Hospital
Leonard Bricker Farm
July 2, 1863 — Map (db m64324) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Lincoln Cemetery
Established in 1867 by the Sons of Good Will for the proper burial of Gettysburg’s African American citizens and Civil War veterans. Some thirty members of the US Colored Troops are buried here, having been denied burial in the National Cemetery . . . — Map (db m31189) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Lydia Leister FarmCivil War Hospital
Lydia Leister Farm July 3-4, 1863 — Map (db m64298) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Major Gen. John F. Reynolds
Commanding Left Wing 1st. 3rd. & 11th. Corps Army of the Potomac July 1st. 1863 Erected by the State of Pennsylvania July 1886 (back of monument) Here Gen. Reynolds Fell — Map (db m6146) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Mary Virginia Wade
A heroine of the Battle of Gettysburg was born in this house ---------------------- May 21, 1843 This tablet was unveiled by her sister Georgia Wade McClellan May 21, 1922 Middle Plaque: Historic Gettysburg Birthplace Jenny Wade 1820 . . . — Map (db m8166) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Mary Virginia Wade
Jennie Wade Aged 20 yrs. 2 mos killed July 3, 1863 while making bread for the Union soldiers. < Right of Monument: > What soever God willeth must be though a Nation mourn. < Left of Monument: > With a courage born of loyalty, she hath done . . . — Map (db m37949) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Michael Crist FarmCivil War Hospital
Michael Crist Farm July, 1863 — Map (db m64320) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Michael Frey FarmCivil War Hospital
Michael Frey Farm Union Hospital & Aid Station July, 1863 — Map (db m64352) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Michael Trostle FarmCivil War Hospital
Michael Trostle Farm ♣ Second, ♦ Third, ✠ Fifth & ✚ Sixth Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m65742) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Nathaniel Lightner FarmCivil War Hospital
Nathaniel Lightner Farm ✚ Sixth & ★ Twelfth Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64308) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Parish HouseChrist Lutheran Church
Family home of Dr. Lawrence Hill 1851 – 1957 July – 1863 Supply depot of Northern Army for temporary hospital in Christ Lutheran Church — Map (db m67675) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Pres. George Washington
Pres. George Washington stopped at the Tate Farm on October 25, 1794. — Map (db m64358) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — President Eisenhower’s Gettysburg Farm
Eisenhower National Historic Site The farm has never looked better, mainly by virtue of the frequent gentle rains we have had since we have been here, and I have been happily renewing my acquaintance with my tiny Angus herd. Eisenhower . . . — Map (db m6196) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Public SchoolCivil War Hospital
Public School July 1863 ( Upper Marker : ) Civil War Building July 1863 — Map (db m65745) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Revolutionary Soldiers in Great Conewago Cemetery
In honor of the Revolutionary Soldiers buried in this cemetery Lt. Col. James Chamberlain • Lt. Col. William Gilliland • Major William Bailey • Capt. Hugh Campbell • Capt. John Graft • Capt. Hugh King • Capt. John McIlvain • Lt. Samuel Gilliland • . . . — Map (db m64714) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Samuel A. Cobean FarmCivil War Hospital
Samuel A. Cobean Farm Ewell’s Corps July, 1863 — Map (db m64321) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Sarah Patterson FarmCivil War Hospital
Sarah Patterson Farm July, 1863 — Map (db m64355) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second best, he didn’t want. – Robert Hartley, herdsmanEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
Cattle housed in the show barn (in front of you) lived in bovine luxury. Designed in 1957 for Eisenhower’s Angus show herd, the barn included a heated office and washroom. The washroom gave herdsmen a warm place to groom cattle even during . . . — Map (db m64403) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Secret Service OfficeEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
Originally the barn’s milk house, this building was established as an office for President Eisenhower’s Secret Service detail in 1955. During the presidential years, one of the 8 – 10 agents who worked each shift would be stationed in the . . . — Map (db m64168) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Sisters of Charity of Emmitsburg
During the Battle of Gettysburg this house of God became a hospital for wounded soldiers. Within its hallowed walls brave men of North and South foes on the field of battle through weeks of pain were nursed with tender and equal care by the Sisters . . . — Map (db m65796) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Adams County Prison
As part of a deal to establish Gettysburg as county seat in 1800, James Gettys donated this lot for a county prison. This two story “bastille-like” building with its 16’ foot stone wall enclosing the prison yard was erected in 1851 to . . . — Map (db m65782) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Coster Avenue Mural
      The Coster Avenue Mural depicts the fight between the Union brigade of Col. Charles R. Coster and the Confederate brigades of Brig. Gen. Harry T. Hays and Col. Isaac E. Avery on the afternoon of July 1, 1863. Coster’s three small regiments . . . — Map (db m64410) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Dobbin House
      The Dobbin House is the oldest building in Gettysburg. It was built by Reverand Alexander Dobbin in 1776. The structure originally served as a home for Mr. Dobbin, his wife, and 19 children, as well as the Reverand’s Classical School, the . . . — Map (db m65788) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The George Spangler Farm Civil War Hospital Site
From Home to Hospital About the George Spangler Farm The George Spangler Farm Civil War Hospital Site is one of the most intact Civil War field hospitals used during the battle of Gettysburg. When George Spangler bought the farm in 1848, he had . . . — Map (db m75494) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The George Spangler Farm Civil War Hospital Site
From Home to Hospital About the George Spangler Farm The George Spangler Farm Civil War Hospital Site is one of the most intact Civil War field hospitals used during the battle of Gettysburg. When George Spangler bought the farm in 1848, he had . . . — Map (db m75508) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Guest House
Remodeled from the previous owner’s garage, “The Little House”, was completed in March 1956. Inside are a sitting room, bedroom and bath. Although used for guests such as Field Marshall Bernard L. Montgomery and Eisenhower’s business . . . — Map (db m64173) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Helicopter Landing PadEisenhower National Historic Park
The smoothest ride I ever had in my life. Eisenhower referring to his first helicopter ride President Eisenhower was the first president to travel by helicopter. His first ride was in 1957 during Operation Alert, a Cold War exercise to . . . — Map (db m37557) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The John Rupp House and Tannery Site
The house on your left was constructed in 1868 for John Rupp. Described as “one of the finest on Baltimore Street, if not the town,” this Gothic Revival style “cottage” reflected the success of Rupp’s “Valuable Steam . . . — Map (db m75503) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The PondEisenhower National Historic Site — National Park Service
When Eisenhower would come (to the farm), and especially if he had a hard day or a hard week at the office, . . . we’d walk down by the flag pole all the way down to the creek, over to the pond.           CPO Walter West, U.S. Navy, who was . . . — Map (db m64394) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The StablesEisenhower National Historic Park
The entire family is eagerly awaiting the arrival at Gettysburg of the Quarter Horse. David is beside himself with joy and although he scorns any danger, I have assured his mother and grandmother that you are sending a gentle and tractable . . . — Map (db m37559) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Stevens Log House
The 1830s Stevens Log House is a fine, intact example of early 19th century village life with few amenities. From this primitive site, its residents observed the great conflict and Confederate occupation of West Middle Street during the Battle of . . . — Map (db m75462) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Trademark of Craftsmen
It is not difficult to imagine the wear on a barn from years of active farming and the changing Pennsylvania seasons. In the spring of 1875, two brothers, Samuel F. Frey and William H. Frey, painters by trade, and Hiram C. Lady, a carpenter’s . . . — Map (db m78901) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Wagon Hotel on Cemetery Hill
On July 1, 1863, when the Federal 1st and 11th Corps were routed on the fields north and west of Gettysburg, the defeated soldiers hurriedly fled towards the citadel of Cemetery Hill. They passed through the town via Baltimore, Washington and . . . — Map (db m75506) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — U.S. Field Hospitals at Gettysburg“The Wounded of Gettysburg”
No written nor expressed language could ever picture the field of Gettysburg! Blood! Blood! And tattered flesh! Shattered bones and mangled forms almost without resemblance of human beings! Faces torn and bruised and lacerated . . . . . . — Map (db m64357) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — U.S. Field Hospitals at Gettysburg“The Wounded of Gettysburg”
No written nor expressed language could ever picture the field of Gettysburg! Blood! Blood! And tattered flesh! Shattered bones and mangled forms almost without resemblance of human beings! Faces torn and bruised and lacerated . . . . . . — Map (db m64387) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — U.S. Field Hospitals at Gettysburg“The Wounded of Gettysburg”
No written nor expressed language could ever picture the field of Gettysburg! Blood! Blood! And tattered flesh! Shattered bones and mangled forms almost without resemblance of human beings! Faces torn and bruised and lacerated . . . . . . — Map (db m64388) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — W.H. Monfort FarmCivil War Hospital
W.H. Monfort Farm July, 1863 — Map (db m64305) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Well, Look What We Found!
At the height of preservation work on the Spangler summer kitchen, this previously unknown well was discovered. After further investigation and interviews with previous caretakers of the property, it was revealed that the well was used for many . . . — Map (db m75496) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Western Maryland Station
. . . — Map (db m35686) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — William Patterson FarmCivil War Hospital
William Patterson Farm July, 1863 — Map (db m64350) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — William Ross FarmCivil War Hospital
William Ross Farm July 1863 — Map (db m64301) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Witness Tree
This sycamore is a living witness to the Battle of Gettysburg. Abraham Lincoln passed by this tree on his way to give the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863. — Map (db m75637) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — American Blockhouse – 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site
“I have also provided timber for two Blockhouses.” - Col. Anthony Wayne, February 4, 1777 In the summer and fall of 1776 American forces concentrated on fortifying the northern point of the rocky Mount Independence . . . — Map (db m19321) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — British Blockhouse - 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site
“Blockhouses, none of them finished.” - Lt. John Starke, Royal Navy, September 1777 After the British captured Mount Independence on July 6, 1777, their military engineers decided to build six new blockhouses to augment . . . — Map (db m19332) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Burial SiteMount Independence State Historic Site
“ . . . this Day there was two men Buried from our Regt.” - Lt. Jonathan Burton, October 4, 1776 This small stone, engraved “N. Richardson of Staddard Eng died 1760,” may mark the only identified grave on . . . — Map (db m17849) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Fort Ticonderoga and Mount DefianceMount Independence State Historic Site
“ . . . a perfect mousetrap.” - Col. Alexander Scammell, September 21, 1777 From here are seen nearly all the powerful forces of nature that made this spot on Lake Champlain the Gibraltar of the North as well as its . . . — Map (db m17846) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Foundation -1776 or 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site — What do you think? -
This is one of the best-preserved stone foundations on Mount Independence. It was built during the Revolution, but historic maps and documents do not refer to it. Who built it? Did the Americans have time to build it during the two weeks in June . . . — Map (db m19441) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — General Hospital – 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site
. . . the new Hospital . . . 250 long & 24 wide.” - Rev. Enos Hitchcock, June 14, 1777 This shallow, dry-laid stone foundation was for the largest building at Mount Independence – a 250-foot long by 24-foot wide, . . . — Map (db m19319) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — German Hut – 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site
Our men built huts out of boards to protect themselves from the cold weather.” - Lt. Von Hille, October 22, 1777 During the American occupation from July 1776 to July 1777, soldiers constructed a breastwork of logs and . . . — Map (db m19436) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Heritage Travelers over the Years
Some of the intrenchments are still visible.” – John Disturnell, 1857 After the American Revolution, numerous visitors curious to see the places that figured so prominently in the war for independence visited Mount . . . — Map (db m19501) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Lake Champlain and the American RevolutionMount Independence State Historic Site
. . . the possession of every thing here depends upon keeping the Command of the Water.” - Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates, July 16, 1776 In front of you is Lake Champlain, at 120 miles long the sixth largest lake in the United . . . — Map (db m19440) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Military Road
Military Road from Mount Independence to Hubbardton 1777 Marked by Hands Cove Chapter D.A.R. 1933 — Map (db m9234) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Mount IndependenceBastion of the Revolution
Fortification was begun in June of 1776, and the name Mount Independence was bestowed following the Declaration of Independence. Lieut. Col. Jeduthan Baldwin was the chief construction engineer. Here the exhausted American Army, Northern Department, . . . — Map (db m9275) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Mt. Independence Military RoadRoute to Hubbardton, 1777
After Ethan Allen seized Fort Ticonderoga, the Americans built Fort Mt. Independence, northwest from here on the Lake. Following Burgoyne’s invasion, Gen. St Clair evacuated the Forts, retreating across these hills to Hubbardton. Vermont . . . — Map (db m9232) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Officers Quarters – 1776Mount Independence State Historic Site
“ . . . some of the officers have good framed houses.” - Dr. Lewis Beebe, September 30, 1776 This fifteen-foot square, well-defined stone foundation may be the remains of quarters for one or more American officers in the . . . — Map (db m17863) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Southern Battery – 1777Mount Independence State Historic Site
began the works at 3 places on Mount Independence.” - Col. Jeduthan Baldwin, June 20, 1777 On June, 1777, American Chief Engineer Jeduthan Baldwin wrote in his journal, “in the afternoon went with Col. Kosiusko . . . — Map (db m19437) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Southern Defense Trail
This walkway is a loop approximately 0.2 mile long with stairs and gentle slopes. It leads you past the remains of a blockhouse (near the parking area), provides a look at the Mount’s rock formations, and provides a vista of the lake south of the . . . — Map (db m19536) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Storehouse - 1776Mount Independence State Historic Site
ordered a large Stoer House to be built.” - Col. Jeduthan Baldwin, August 17, 1776 At least one of the storehouses constructed on Mount Independence during the Revolution stood in this area. Portions of the remaining . . . — Map (db m19366) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — The American Southern Defenses – 1776-1777
we are Building a Large & Long Breast work on the South Side.” - Pvt. Thomas Killam, August 19, 1776 When the American Northern Army arrived at Ticonderoga in mid-July 1776, the 300-acre peninsula opposite on the Vermont . . . — Map (db m19543) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — Third Brigade Encampment – 1776Mount Independence State Historic Site
. . . our Men is clearing the Encamping Ground over the Lake.” - Sgt. Timothy Tuttle, July 23, 1776 In July 1776 Northern Army commander Gen. Horatio Gates organized regiments at Mount Independence and Ticonderoga into . . . — Map (db m19318) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Orwell — To Repel the Enemy
The Generals have Fix’d on a spot . . . to be fortified.” - Lt. Col. Matthias Ogden, July 19, 1776 On July 5, 1777, Thomas Anburey, who was traveling with British Lt. Gen. John Burgoyne on Lake Champlain, observed as they . . . — Map (db m19480) HM
Vermont (Addison County), Shoreham — Larrabee’s Point
John Larrabee established the first regular ferry here under a grant from the Vermont Legislature when the only business at the site was his tavern. In 1823, the year that the Champlain Canal opened, Larrabee and Samuel Holley built a store and a . . . — Map (db m15580) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Hillsman HouseLee’s Retreat — April 6, 1865
Union forces assembled along this ridge while Confederate troops prepared on the opposite slope. Federal forces crossed Little Sailor’s Creek for a fierce battle which compelled many Southerners to surrender. The house served as a hospital for both . . . — Map (db m11795) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Holt’s CornerLee’s Retreat — April 6, 1865
While passing through this intersection, the Confederate column was attacked by Union cavalry. Consequently, part of Lee’s army, and the main wagon train, turned north onto the Jamestown Road while the main portion continued straight ahead to Rice’s . . . — Map (db m11799) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — W. R. Turner Memorial Trek
Erected in memory of W. R. Turner, historian of Blackstone, Virginia, for his work to preserve the historic battlefields and routes of General Robert E. Lee’s retreat Centennial Year 1961 Piedmont Area Explorer Scouts B.S.A. Erected by . . . — Map (db m11800) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — OL---10 — Lee’s Retreat
Here Custer, commanding advance guard of an Army of the Potomac, struck and drove back Fitz Lee, left flank guard of Army of Northern Virginia, April 3, 1865. — Map (db m6156) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — Namozine ChurchPursuit Cathces Up — Lee’s Retreat
When Gen. Robert E. Lee evacuated the Army of Northern Virginia from Petersburg and Richmond on April 2-3, 1865, he ordered the army’s wings to unite at Amelia Court House, where trains would meet them with food and other supplies. The army would . . . — Map (db m6049) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — Namozine ChurchLee's Retreat
April 3, 1865 As Lee's men continued their morning march toward Ameila Court House, cavalries skirmished around this church. Forced to withdraw, the armies continued a running battle that ended near Deep Creek. Namozine Church also served as a . . . — Map (db m6071) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K-158 — Appomattox Court HouseNew and Old
This building, erected in 1892 when the county seat was moved to this location, should not be mistaken for the original, built in 1846 and destroyed by fire in 1892. Three miles northeast is old Appomattox Court House and the McLean House where Lee . . . — Map (db m15514) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Battle of Appomattox StationFinal Blow — Lee's Retreat
You are standing near the site of Appomattox Station Depot on the South Side Railroad. Here, on the afternoon of April 8, 1865, Union cavalrymen under Gen. George A. Custer dealt the Army of Northern Virginia a final blow. First, they captured . . . — Map (db m3837) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Battle of Appomattox StationLee's Retreat
April 8, 1865 Union cavalry arrived early in the evening and captured three of Lee’s four supply trains. Advancing toward Appomattox Court House, they encountered the surplus Confederate wagons and artillery train. After a brief conflict, . . . — Map (db m6075) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K-159 — Battle of Appomattox Station — 1865
Near this building stood the station of the South Side Railroad where, on April 8, 1865, three trains unloading supplies for the Army of Northern Virginia were captured by units of Sheridan’s Union cavalry under Gen. Geo. Custer. Significant for its . . . — Map (db m3605) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — “Message of Peace”
From near his headquarters atop the rise in front of you, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant sent a message that jolted a nation. After finishing his meeting with Lee at the McLean House, Grant paused along the road and scribbled an unassuming note . . . — Map (db m5914) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — “Salute of Arms”
On April 12, 1865, Union Brig. Gen. Joshua Chamberlain watched the distant ridge as the Confederates prepared for the surrender. They formed into column, marched into the valley, then up the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road toward the village. As the . . . — Map (db m5968) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — A Strategic DelayAppomattox Court House Nat’l Hist Park
As Lee’s Confederate Army retreated west, Federal forces blocked their way. Near this spot, Union artillery pieces commanded by Lieutenant James H. Lord and a cavalry brigade led by Brevet Brigadier General Charles Smith proved a strategic delay to . . . — Map (db m15524) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — After the Surrender
The depression before you is the trace of the old Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road. Gen. Robert E. Lee rode this route both to and from his meeting with Grant on April 9, 1865. His return to the army – as he passed towards his headquarters atop . . . — Map (db m6004) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — ANV Headquarters
On this spot were established the headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A, commanding, from April 8th to April 11th, 1865. — Map (db m15533) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox
Here on Sunday April 9, 1865, after four years of heroic struggle in defense of principles believed fundamental to the existence of our government, Lee surrendered 9000 men, the remnant of an army still unconquered in spirit. — Map (db m6005) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox Court House
Here, amidst the once-quiet streets and lanes of Appomattox Court House, Lee, Grant, and their tired armies enacted one of the great dramas in American history. “General, this is deeply humiliating; but I console myself with the thought . . . — Map (db m15530) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — MG-1 — Appomattox Court House Confederate Cemetery
Here are buried eighteen Confederate soldiers who dies April 8 and 9, 1865 in the closing days of the War Between the States. The remains of one unknown Union soldier found some years after the war are interned beside the Confederate dead. About 500 . . . — Map (db m5987) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox River
Near this site General Lee crossed the Appomattox River and proceeded up the hill to the McLean House where he met General Grant to draft the terms of surrender. April 9, 1865. — Map (db m6006) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Clover Hill Tavern
Built in 1819, this was the first building in what would become the village of Appomattox Court House. The Clover Hill Tavern served travelers along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road. For several decades, it offered the village’s only restaurant, . . . — Map (db m5989) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Confederate Cemetery
Buried here are nineteen men (out of perhaps 100) killed during the last two days of war in Virginia. These men were at first buried where they died – at hospitals or in farm fields and woodlots around Appomattox Court House. But in 1866, the . . . — Map (db m5990) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Confederates TrappedAppomattox Court House Nat’l Hist Park
For most of the war, Lee and his army had tormented their Northern enemies – at Gaines’ Mill, Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. But here, on April 9, 1865, the once-mighty Army of Northern Virginia found itself trapped. Lee faced . . . — Map (db m15526) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Final Combat
“It seems to me every one was more scared than ever, from the fact that we knew the war was nearly over, and we did not want to be killed at the end of the war.” Private John L. Smith, 118th Pennsylvania Late on the morning of . . . — Map (db m5970) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Grant and Lee Meeting
On this spot Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, U.S.A. and General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A. met on the morning of April 10th, 1865. — Map (db m15535) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Grant’s Pursuit
The four-year effort to vanquish the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia came to its climax in the fields before you. “Legs will win the battle men …. They can’t escape, if you will keep up to it.” Maj. Gen. E.O.C.Ord, . . . — Map (db m15516) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Last Artillery Shots
From this spot was fired last shot from the artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia on the morning of April 9th, 1865. — Map (db m15534) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee and Grant Meet
On the knoll before you, Lee and Grant held the second of their two meetings at Appomattox Court House. They met here on the morning of April 10. Grant hoped to enlist Lee’s support in urging the surrender of other Confederate armies, and Lee was . . . — Map (db m5966) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee’s Last Headquarters
A short distance inside these woods stood Robert E. Lee’s last headquarters. Here on April 8, 1865, he held his final council of war. Here on April 10 he issued his farewell order to his army. And from here, on April 12, he departed for home – . . . — Map (db m5960) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — McLean House
At midday on April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee rode into this yard, dismounted, and disappeared into the McLean House. Grant, surrounded by generals and staff officers, soon followed. Dozens of officers, horses, and onlookers waited outside. . . . — Map (db m5962) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — North Carolina
The last Federal battery taken by the Confederates was captured by the North Carolina cavalry brigade of Brig. Gen. W.P. Roberts at this place. — Map (db m5972) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Raine Cemetery and Monument
The 30-foot obelisk marks the Raine family cemetery. Erected in 1912 by C. Hunter Raine, the monument honors past family members, including C. Hunter’s father, Charles James Raine, who served as a captain in the Lee Battery of Virginia Artillery. . . . — Map (db m36257) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Raine Memorial
(Front):Erected by C. Hunter Raine in loving memory of his father Chas. J. Raine captain of Lee Battery, Co. A, Virginia Artillery, C. S. A. Killed in the Battle of Mine Run Va., November 30th, 1863 and the members of the family buried . . . — Map (db m15520) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — The Surrender Ceremony
“As my decimated and ragged band with their bullet torn banner marched into its place, someone in the blue line…called for three cheers for the last brigade to surrender… [F]or us this soldierly generosity was more than we could bear. Many . . . — Map (db m5965) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Wartime Landscape
The road trace in front of you is the remnant of the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road – on April 9, 1865, the most important road in Virginia to Robert E. Lee. Along this road he planned to escape west, hoping eventually to turn south and join . . . — Map (db m5984) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Vera — Lee’s Rear GuardFinal Blow — Lee’s Retreat
You are standing where Gen. James Longstreet’s corps entrenched early in the morning of April 9, 1865, to protect the rear of the Army of Northern Virginia. Gen. Robert E. Lee and most of the army bivouacked about four miles south, just short of . . . — Map (db m6051) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Vera — Lee's Rear GuardLee's Retreat
April 8, 1865. General Longstreet built breastworks here to protect the rear of Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. On the morning of April 9, General Lee arrived hoping to meet General Grant. After learning that he was approaching from . . . — Map (db m6073) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Maury School
The Clarendon Elementary School was built in 1910 to serve the growing Clarendon neighborhood. The two-story symmetrical building was designed with a central hall and four classrooms on each floor. The school was renamed in 1925 to honor Matthew . . . — Map (db m49434) HM

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