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Lake Hartwell image, Touch for more information
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 11, 2009
Lake Hartwell
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — White Oak United Methodist Church
(Front): First known as White Oak Chapel this church was dedicated on October, 18, 1859 by Rev. Issac I. Tatum of the Alabama Conference Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Society was organized by Rev. John J. Cassady who served as pastor . . . — Map (db m82873) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Holtville — Holtville School
In the late 1930's and early 1940's Holtville School won national acclaim as one the foremost examples of the progressive education movement in the U.S. It was one of 33 southern schools in 1938 chosen to receive financial support in developing new . . . — Map (db m83689) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — William Patrick Lay — (1853-1940)
William Patrick Lay (1853-1940), founder of Alabama Power Company, built his first hydroelectric plant on Big Wills Creek about 2 miles east on Simmons Lane. Lay purchased the Old Wesson Mill in 1902 and built a small hydroelectric generating . . . — Map (db m73995) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Jefferson — Jackson Trail
This is the same road over which marched the famous Gen. Andrew Jackson. This marker erected April 1926 By Georgia Daughters of The American Revolution. Atlanta Chapter, Atlanta, and Sunbury Chapter Winder. — Map (db m19769) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — Butts County Confederate Monument
In memory of the Confederate Soldiers of Butts County, whose undying devotion to duty and self sacrifice in their country's service, we cherish; and whose heroic deeds and patriotism, we embalm in stone, as they are enshrined in our hearts. — Map (db m24591) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — A Changing Landscape
How old is this forest? Prior to the early 1800's Cockspur Island was primarily a grassy salt marsh interspersed with a few, small, forested hammocks. But things were about to change. In 1829 the army began installing drainage canals and a dike . . . — Map (db m63708) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — Telfair Academy
Site of home or Royal Governor Sir James Wright, Where, in 1776, By Authority of Councle of safety, Governor Wright was Arrested by Joseph Habersham. — Map (db m63711) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Confederate Dead — 1861 - 1865
Elbert County To Her Confederate Dead — Map (db m22043) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Dedicated to the Memory
Dedicated To the Memory Of All Citizens Of Elbert County, Georgia Who gave their lives In the Service Of Our County World War I World War II Korean Conflict Vietnam Era 1917 - 1975 "If ye break faith,we shall . . . — Map (db m21912) WM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — 052-13 — Elbert County
Created from Wilkes County by Act of Dec, 10, 1790. Elbert County was settled in 1784 by Gen. George Mathews and a group from Virginia and Carolina. The site of Petersburg, the original settlement and third largest town in Georgia in its day, is . . . — Map (db m21893) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Elbert County Courthouse
The Elbert County Courthouse was built in 1894 and opened in a formal ceremony at the beginning of January 1895, as the third county courthouse building and fourth County site in Elbert County. After the private home of Thomas A. Carter, on . . . — Map (db m21904) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Elbert County's Dead in the Civil War
[Center]: In characters of living light That tell a wondrous story. Their deeds have brightened many a page With never-dying glory. [Left panel]: Thomas J. Ayres Clement Brewer Thompson H. Dye Elijah Allgood John R. . . . — Map (db m21909) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — 052-14 — Grave of General Wiley Thompson — ← 4 bl. E.
General Wiley Thompson, considered the ablest and most humane of the agents to the Seminole Indians of Florida, was ambushed and killed near the agency at Fort King, Florida, December 28, 1835, by Osceola and a band of warriors who opposed removal . . . — Map (db m21903) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Memorial Park History
On April 4, 1923 Ora Eugene Tate, Sr. deeded this 1.8 acre tract of land to the ladies of the Service Star Legion of Elbert County. The deed stipulated that the parcel of land must be perpetually used and maintained as a memorial park. The . . . — Map (db m21941) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — My American Soldier
Inscription appears on reverse side of monument. Remember me as you walk away For you I lived and died this day and in this moment I can recall That as I fell I still stood tall Into the falling night I cry tell them I love them and . . . — Map (db m21910) WM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Navy Seabees Can Do
Erected by and Dedicated to Navy Seabee Veterans of Elbert County Jim Humphry - Joe Deadwyler - David Smith - Claude E. Ray,JR. - Cecil Smith - Ed Cartldge - Hogan Brown - P. Mattox Glenn - Ross Brown - Richard Brady - George A. Grogan • . . . — Map (db m21927) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — 052-3 — Old Post Road
This Road is older than Elberton. Mail was carried over it by Post Riders before Falling Creek Church was built in 1788 and during Washington's Administration. Later a stage coach ran between Elberton & Lexington three times a week, stopping at . . . — Map (db m21902) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Old Seaboard Airline Depot
[Stone Marker]: Home of Elbert County Historical Society Built 1910 - Restored 1986 - 1989 [Separate Plaque]: This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States . . . — Map (db m21907) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Revolutionary War Soldiers
In Honor of Revolutionary War Soldiers whose graves and/or estates are in Ebert County, Georgia A project of Stephen Heard Chapter, NSDAR Historical Research Committee Historical Research Committee Helen Fleming Stone, . . . — Map (db m21913) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — Samuel Elbert
Elbert County was named in honor of General Samuel Elbert, an outstanding military leader in the Revolutionary War and distinguished Governor of the State of Georgia in 1785-86. Born in 1740, Elbert was orphaned at an early age; achieved . . . — Map (db m21908) HM
Georgia (Elbert County), Elberton — The Christmas Tree House
The Christmas Tree House at 305 Heard Street was built as the home of the George Loehr family, who introduced to Elberton and the Rest of Georgia their native German practice of celebrating Christmas with a candle-lit tree; and the house received . . . — Map (db m21940) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Atlanta — 060-167 — Mt. Gilead M. E. Church — Organized 1824
In 1864, the building at this location was a prominent landmark in the final phases of Federal military operations against Atlanta. Three Federal army corps marched this way enroute to Red Oak and Jonesboro; 4th and 14th of the Army of Cumberland . . . — Map (db m19896) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 68 — Biltmore House
Designed for George W. Vanderbilt by Richard M. Hunt. Constructed, 1890-1895. Opened to public, 1930. Three miles west. — Map (db m12704) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Buncombe County Court House — 1927
1927 Buncombe County Court House Erected by the People of Buncombe County Board of County Commissioners Hon.E.M.Lyda Chairman Hon.W.E.Johnson~Hon.W.E.McLean Burgin Pernnell County Attorney L.E.Jarrett County . . . — Map (db m18694) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Civic Pride
Asheville's central square has long served the needs of government and commerce. From 1892 to 1926 a massive city hall with a bell tower dominated the east end. The building housed police and fire departments in addition to municipal offices. . . . — Map (db m17062) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 57 — Confederate Armory
Manufactured Enfield-type rifles. In 1863 Plant moved to Columbia.S.C. Building was located 1/4 mi.SE.Burned in 1865. — Map (db m30269) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 32 — Jeter C. Pritchard
United States Senator, 1895-1903. Republican leader, newspaperman, federal judge. His home is 3/10 mile east; grave is 1.3 mi. west. — Map (db m12708) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 79 — Lillian Exum Clement Stafford — 1894 - 1925
First female legislator in the South. Elected to N.C. House, 1920. Her law office was 400 yds west; home ½ mi. NE. — Map (db m12707) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 38 — Rutherford Trace
The expedition led by Gen. Griffith Rutherford against the Cherokee, September 1776, passed nearby. — Map (db m17056) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 9 — Stoneman's Raid
On a raid through western North Carolina Gen. Stoneman's U.S. Cavalry occupied Asheville on April 26, 1865. — Map (db m12768) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P-53 — Sulphur Springs
Health & social resort during the nineteenth century; patronized by low-country planters. Springs are 600 yds. S. — Map (db m17093) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — The County of Buncombe
Near and West of this spot at Gum Spring The County of Buncombe was organized on April 16, 1792 under act of the General Assembly of North Carolina Erected by The National Society of the Colonial Dames Of America In the State of . . . — Map (db m12831) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 17 — Thomas Wolfe
Author of "Look Homeward Angel" (1929)."Of Time and the River", and other works. Home stands 200 yards N., birthplace 500 yds. N.E. — Map (db m12706) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Thomas Wolfe House / Dixieland — Old Kentucky Home
Dixieland Asheville native Thomas Wolfe achieved international fame with the publication of his first full-length novel, Look Homeward, Angel, in 1929. Many of the incidents in the book took place in his mother's boardinghouse, "Old . . . — Map (db m12757) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — To Honor the Revolutionary Soldiers — Buried in Buncombe County, N.C.
James Alexander • Zebulon Baird • Willian Brittain • Adam Cooper • Samuel Davidson • Willian Davidson • Lot Harper • Joseph Harrison • William Moore • John Patton • Daniel Smith • Valentine Thrash • David Vance • Robert Williamson . . . — Map (db m37193) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — War with Spain
This marker is erected in loving memory of the men of Buncombe County who volunteered and served in the War with Spain, the insurrection in the Philippines and the China Relief Expedition, 1898 - 1902 — Map (db m37194) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Hominy — P-39 — Rutherford Trace
The expedition led by Gen. Griffith Rutherford against the Cherokee, Sept., 1776, camped near-by along Hominy Creek. — Map (db m17094) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Weaverville — Brothers In Service — Zebulon and Robert Vance Brithplace
Here were born two notable Buncombe County brothers, Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) and Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899). Zebulon Vance was a Whig and supporter of the Union who opposed secession until the last moment. At the outbreak of war in . . . — Map (db m23138) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Weaverville — P 2 — Zebulon B. Vance
Governor, 1862 - 5, 1877 - 9; U.S. Senator, 1879 - 94. Birthplace 6 Miles Northeast. — Map (db m22782) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), West Asheville — "End of Car Line" — 1890-1934 — Built by Edwin G. Carrier
The west Asheville & Sulphur springs electric railway ran from the springs to Government Street, at what is now Pritchard Park Fare 5¢ — Map (db m17055) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), West Asheville — P-86 — Electric Streetcars
First electric trolley system in N.C. opened, Feb. 1, 1889, bolstering regional tourism. Served train depot 1/4 mile S.E. — Map (db m17058) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Morganton — Morganton — Rocky Ford Engagement — Stoneman's Raid
(Preface): On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m20348) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Morganton — N 40 — N.C. School for the Deaf
Opened 1894 under superintendent Edward McKee Goodwin. Main building designed by A.G. Bauer. — Map (db m20338) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Morganton — N 13 — Stoneman's Raid
On their raid through western North Carolina Gen. Stoneman's U.S. cavalry skirmished with Confederates near here on April 17, 1865. — Map (db m20346) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Rutherford College — N 29 — Rutherford College
Evolved from private school opened c. 1853 by R.L. Abernethy. Operated 1900-1933 by Methodist Church. Closed 1935. The original site 1.3 mi N. — Map (db m20391) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Rutherford College — N 29 — Rutherford College
Evolved from private school opened c. 1853 by R.L. Adernethy. Operated 1900-1933 by Methodist Church. Closed 1935. The original site 8/10 mi N. — Map (db m20393) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — Historic Valdese Foundation Heritage Millennium Clock Tower
For the European Waldensian settlers of Valdese, a clock tower served as a landmark or beacon for a town's inhabitants. This landmark honors and memorializes all these founders, leaders, citizens and organizations who have greatly contributed to the . . . — Map (db m20406) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — The Waldensian Colony
To the Waldensian Colony from the Cottian Alps. who settled here first in 1893 numbering in all 427, in recognition of their Christian ideals, integrity, industry and good citizenship this monument is erected, by the Town of Valdese. And . . . — Map (db m20336) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — Valdese Centennial Park — Legend of Plaques
First Marker:Centennial Seal Official Seal of the 100th Celebration of the founding of Valdese Future From an agrarian beginning through Industrial growth, comes a bright horizon Civic Citizens Band together . . . — Map (db m20396) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — N 2 — Waldenses
A religious body dating from the middle ages. The town of Valdese was founded by members of this group in 1893. — Map (db m20335) HM
North Carolina (Caldwell County), Lenoir — N 11 — Stoneman's Raid
On a Raid through western North Carolina Gen. Stoneman's U.S. Cavalry passed through Lenoir, Mar. 28, and there again, Apr. 15-17 1865. — Map (db m20388) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — 210MM German Howitzer — Surrendered to U.S. 1918,
Placed here in Memory of the Men from this community who participated in the World War Insert Rededicated by American Legion Post 48 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1957 to all veterans man and women of this area May 24, 1998 — Map (db m18540) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Frame Church
To your right stood a frame church built by First Presbyterian Church. The first service was Nov. 2, 1878, and was their house of worship until 1905, when it was purchased by Christ Lutheran Church. The Lutherans worshiped here until 1926. It was . . . — Map (db m18567) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Henry Weidner Robinson
Commemorating the memory of Henry Weidner Robinson This marks the town of Hickory Tavern as incorporated December 12, 1863. The city of Hickory Commemorates Henry Weidner Robinson who in 1859 gave this site as a public common. The citizens of . . . — Map (db m18544) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Old Hickory Tavern — Birthplace of Hickory
To the rear of this spot stood a log house known in 1799 as Hickory Tavern. This tract of 640 acres was surveyed by Col. Christopher W. Beekman on June 8, 1779 and was granted to William McMullen Oct. 28, 1783 on the south side of this tavern ran . . . — Map (db m18538) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Tower of Miracles — 2001
Maryrose Carroll Millennium Art Committee City of Hickory — Map (db m18542) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Fallston — Fallston Veterans Memorial
We did it not for the glory but for God, country and each other forever brothers and sisters — Map (db m44604) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Grover — O 6 — Cornwallis
Entered North Carolina near here. January, 1781, on his second invasion of the state, Pursuing Morgan and Green — Map (db m16819) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Grover — O 22 — North Carolina/South Carolina
North Carolina Colonized, 1585-87, by First English Settlers in America; Permanently Settled C.1650; First To Vote Readiness For Independence, Apr. 12, 1776 South Carolina Formed in 1712 from part of Carolina, which . . . — Map (db m16820) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Kings Mountain — O 1 — Kings Mountain Battleground
Scene of Decisive British defeat, Oct. 7, 1780. Seven miles south in S.C. National Park — Map (db m17658) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Kings Mountain — O 5 — Kings Mountain Battleground
Site of decisive British defeat on Oct. 7, 1780. National Military park located 5 mi. southeast in South Carolina. — Map (db m17659) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Kings Mountain — William Andrew Mauney House — Local Historic Landmark
An early settler to Kings Mountain, William Andrew Mauney built a store on this site circa 1870. When Mr. Mauney moved his business to a location in downtown Kings Mountain, he turned the store ninety degrees and added a two story structure to the . . . — Map (db m17703) HM
North Carolina (Columbus County), Whiteville — D 74 — Millie ~ Christine McKoy
Black Siamese twins born near here, 1851. exhibited in U.S. and Europe. Died in 1912. Grave is five miles N. — Map (db m20458) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Cherryville Veterans Memorial
World War I Dourus Dalton Beam • Guyser Canipe • John Q. Homesley • Alfonso L. Mauney • Clarence leonard Waters • Phillip S. Hullet

World War II H. Clinton Adams • David Alferd Baxter • Francis Wayne Baxter • Thomas Quay . . . — Map (db m44603) WM

North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — City Jail
This nineteenth century building was used only for the incarceration of an occasional drunk. Logs are joined with square notches, with weatherboard gable ends and a gable roof. — Map (db m44472) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Federal Bonded Liquor Warehouse
The log building was built by Benaja Black in the 1800's, when the area was known as White Pines. Corn was the main crop at this time. Farmers received permits to make corn whiskey. It was brought to this warehouse, put into barrels, and shipped . . . — Map (db m44468) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — John F Black School House
This simple schoolhouse, built in 1898, is typical of small schools built in the turn of the century. Was built on land belonging to John F. Black and served until 1912 when a larger school replaced it. — Map (db m44464) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Noah Benjamin Kendrick House — 1922
The home of business, civic, religious and educational leader and member of the North Carolina Legislature. Designed to demonstrate the quality of the products of Kendrick Brick and tile. — Map (db m44480) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Orignal City Hall — Cherryville, N.C.
First used as city hall in 1892 Built by M.L. Rudisill, Mayor at that time Prior to 1892, the city council met in store buildings or in homes of members. The town paid $15.00 per year rent until the building was donated to town . . . — Map (db m44470) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Smoke House
The log building was built by Benaja Black in 1847, when the area was known as White Pines. The logs are securely joined with pegs. Meat was cured here by subjecting it to dense smoke, and it was stored here during the winter or until used. — Map (db m44474) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Confederate Soldiers Monument
(Front): Confederate Soldiers monument On these grounds between 1861-1865 over 1500 men from Gaston County answered the call of their State and County to Defend the South in the War between the States. (Back): Co. 1-11 87th . . . — Map (db m18586) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — O 50 — Dallas
Named for G.M. Dallas. First seat of Gaston County, 1846~1911;site of Gaston College, now extinct. Courthouse built 1848 is here. — Map (db m18573) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Eli Hoyle House — C.1832
One of the finest surviving federal style houses in Gaston County. Built as the seat of a 356 acre plantation. Part of the Ancestral Hoyle Family Lands. Listed on the local & National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m44380) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — First Gaston County Courthouse
On This square was located the Courthouse of Gaston County from 1847 until the County seat was moved to Gastonia in 1911. The first structure, built of logs, was replaced by a brick building in 1848. The interior of this latter building, together . . . — Map (db m18582) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Gaston County Courthouse (former) — -1848-
This Greek Revival structure served as the county courthouse from 1848 to 1911, when the county seat moved to Gastonia. It marks the center of the Dallas Historic District, a Federal Register site. — Map (db m18577) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Gaston County Home — 1904
On this site c.1874 structures existed to provide for the upkeep of the less fortunate, an imposing structure for its time and purpose, it gives physical and concrete evidence of the caring qualities of the people of Gaston County. — Map (db m18616) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Hoffman Hotel 1852
Hotel provided lodging for visitors to town and court sessions, and for male students of the original Gaston College. Jury was sequestered on the third floor "Bull Pen." Daniel Hoffman was the builder, Jonas Hoffman, Second proprietor, structure . . . — Map (db m18610) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Jail - 1848
This building with the West addition served as the Gaston County Jail until 1911 when the County seat was moved to Gastonia. The Sheriff and his family had living quarters on the first floor. The second floor still contains the main cell block. — Map (db m18614) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Rhyne Store — 1850
Built as a General Store with living quarters upstairs by cotton manufacturing industry pioneer Moses H. Rhyne this structure also served as a Post Office and as a site of County Court during rebuilding of the Court House damaged by fire in 1874. — Map (db m18609) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Smyre - Pasour House — 1850
Built by Dr. J.F. Smyre This building was sold in 1851 to Ely Pasour, State Legislator, Postmaster and First Mayor of Dallas. The northern addition was used as a classroom for privately tutoring boys. The granite upping block near the street was . . . — Map (db m18612) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Vietnam Memorial — July 4, 1974
This Monument is given by the town of Dallas and the Dallas Jaycees and is Dedicated to the memory of the brave young men of Dallas who Sacrificed their lives in the Vietnam Conflict. Jerry L. Addis, U.S. Army, Jun 24, 1969 Roy Neal Burris, . . . — Map (db m18608) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — William C. Friday — Educator
As President of the University of North Carolina from 1956-86, he developed it into a 16 campus system and a national model. Respected nationwide for his compassion, vision, leadership and integrity. Born July 13, 1920 to Lathan and Beth Friday, . . . — Map (db m18580) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Gastonia — King's Pinnacle
King's Pinnacle is named for the unique formation at its summit resembling a king's crown. The pinnacle is the highest peak in the park at 1,705 feet in elevation. It towers more than 800 feet above the surrounding landscape. It's elevation is . . . — Map (db m23399) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), High Shoals — O 54 — John Fulenwider
Founder of High Shoals Iron Works about 1795. One of first producers of pig iron by charcoal process. Revolutionary patriot. Buried 20 yds. W. — Map (db m18571) HM
South Carolina (Anderson County), Anderson — The Wilton E. Hall Bridge
Named in honor of Wilton E. Hall Publisher of The Anderson Independent and Daily Mail For his dedicated service to Anderson County and South Carolina — Map (db m19493) HM
South Carolina (Anderson County), Pendleton — Dr. Don C. Garrison — President of Tri-County Technical College — November 1, 1971 - July 31, 2003
In recognition of Dr. Don C. Garrison for his thirty-two years of devoted service as the second president of the College for his dynamic leadership within the College, the State technical college system, and community colleges nationwide; for his . . . — Map (db m18857) HM
South Carolina (Anderson County), Pendleton — Tanglewood Mansion
This property was this site of a private residence as early as 1830's. In 1860, John Baylis Earle Sloan and his wife, Mollie Seaborne Sloan, established a home that became known as Tanglewood. The columns and the ruins seen today are all . . . — Map (db m16616) HM
South Carolina (Anderson County), Pendleton — Thomas Green Clemson Parkway
Dedicated in 1979 in Honor of Thomas Green Clemson 1807-1888 A Native Philadelphian and Leading Agriculturist. Mr. Clemson was U.S. Charge D'Affaires to Belgium, U.S. Superintendent of Agriculture, and the 1868 President . . . — Map (db m16617) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Calhoun
This Monument was erected by the women of South Carolina in 1896 to John Caldwell Calhoun in commemoration of his eminent Statesmanship during the many years of his public life - it replaces one formerly on the same spot which proved . . . — Map (db m19133) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 1948 — Charleston Gas Light Company
This Building, erected in 1878 by the Charleston Gas Light Company, A pioneer in Public Service, was Designed by Edward Brickell White Soldier-Engineer-Architect The South Carolina Power Company is the outgrowth of the Charleston gas Light Company, . . . — Map (db m19218) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — City Hall
This building, designed by Gabriel Manigault and built in 1801 for the Charleston branch of The First Bank of the United States, Stands upon the site which was set apart as a market place in 1672 and used for that purpose . . . — Map (db m19539) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — City Market
Here was erected between 1788 and 1804 a public market on land ceded to City Council by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Et Al...work of filling in low ground and creek completed in 1807; and six blocks of buildings constucted extending . . . — Map (db m19178) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Col. Othneil Beale's House — 99 - 101 East Bay — C. 1723 - 1740
Othneil Beale, sea Captain from New England, Colonel of Provincial Troops, Engineer, Successful merchant, built this house about 1740, with ground floors for mercantile use, and living rooms above Finely Cypress Paneled. The previous owners, . . . — Map (db m19665) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Farmers and Exchange Bank
has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1980 Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service United States Department of the . . . — Map (db m19673) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Historical Sketch
This site was the home of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer. In 1745, Chief Justice of South Carolina Charles Pinckney purchased the property known as Collenton Square. In 1853 Miss Pinckney donated property for a chapel to be built where . . . — Map (db m19177) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Hurricane Hugo
On the night of September 21, 1989, Hurricane Hugo struck the South Carolina Lowcountry. During that night winds reached 125 miles per hour and a storm surge of 15 feet swept over nearby McClellanville. The eye of Hugo passed over Charleston at . . . — Map (db m19171) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John P. Grace Tower
The John P. Grace Memorial Bridge Named to Commemorate The former Mayor of Charleston And President of the Cooper River Bridge CO. The Grace Bridge (Modeled Here) Spanned Charleston from 1929 to 2005. Built by the Cooper River Bridge . . . — Map (db m19216) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Marion Square — Named in Honor of — General Francis Marion
At the time of the Revolution the town-gates stood near this spot across what is now King Street, originally the high way into Charles Town and formerly called the "Broad Path". In 1780 these gates were enclosed in the "Horn-Work", the post of honor . . . — Map (db m30197) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — One Broad Street
This building is one of America's finest crafted Italianate structures. First opened in 1853 as State Bank of South Carolina, it has survived Bombardment, Hurricanes and a Major Earthquake, and Twice been restored along its original plans - . . . — Map (db m19668) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ordinance of Secession
This Building stands on the site formerly occupied by S.C. Institute Hall where, on December 20, 1860, was signed and ratified the Ordinance of Secession Which withdrew the state of South Carolina from the Union and led to the formation of the . . . — Map (db m19240) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Richard Hutson — 1745 - 1795
Herein Lie the Remains of Richard Hutson 1747 - 1795 son of Rev. William and Mary Woodward Hutson South Carolina Patriot, Statesman and Jurist Graduated Princeton 1765 Founding Body The College of Charleston 17-72 - 1794 Member S.C. general . . . — Map (db m19238) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — St Michael's Episcopal Church
. . . — Map (db m19105) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-5 — St. Michael's Church
Here in the churchyard of St. Michael's lie buried two Signers of the U.S. Constitution Charles Cotesworth Pickney (1746-1825) Lawyer and Legislator Major General, U.S. Army Minister to France Presidential candidate . . . — Map (db m19102) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Stede Bonnet / Richard Worley
Near this spot in the autumn of 1718, Stede Bonnet, Notorious "Gentleman Pirate", and twenty nine of his men, captured by Colonel William Rhett, met their just deserts after a trial and charge, famous in American history, by Chief Justice Nicholas . . . — Map (db m19172) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 195 — The Independent or Congregational Church of Charlestown — Founded 1681 — American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
The brickwork below is thought to be from the second of four buildings to house the church. Constructed in 1732, it was replaced in 1804 by a Robert Mills designed sanctuary, circular in shape. Said to be the largest domed building in the U.S., it . . . — Map (db m121855) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — The Site of Carteret Bastion
The Plan of Charles Town Prepared by Edward Crisp about 1704, gives the location of the several Bastions A. Granville B. Craven C. Cartaret D. Colleton E. Ashley F. Blake G. The Half Moon I. Johnson's Cover'd Half Moon L. The . . . — Map (db m19229) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — The Site of Colleton Bastion
The Plan of Charles Town Prepared by Edward Crisp about 1704, gives the Location of the several Bastions A. Granville B. Craven C. Cartaret D. Colleton E. Ashley F. Blake G. The Half Moon I. Johnson's Cover'd Half Moon L. The . . . — Map (db m19231) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — The Site of Craven Bastion
The Plan of Charles Town Prepared by Edward Crisp about 1704, gives the location of the several Bastions A. Granville B. Craven C. Cartaret D. Colleton E. Ashley F. Blake G. The Half Moon I. Johnson's Cover'd Half Moon L. The . . . — Map (db m19228) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — The Site of Granville Bastion
The Plan of Charles Town Prepared by Edward Crisp about 1704, gives the location of the several Bastions A. Granville B. Craven C. Cartaret D. Colleton E. Ashley F. Blake G. The Half Moon I. Johnson's Cover'd Half Moon L. The . . . — Map (db m19230) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-3 — Thomas Smith — Governor of Carolina — 1693~1694
Planter, Merchant, Surgeon, arrived in Charles Town in 1684 with his first wife, Barbara Atkins, and sons, Thomas and George. A cacique by 1690, he was created Landgrave by the Lords Proprietors on May 13, 1691. He died in his 46th year on . . . — Map (db m19107) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — To the Defenders of Fort Moultrie
[Front of Monument:] [Upper Plaque:] Second South Carolina Regiment Army of the Revolution Organized June 17, 1775 [Lower Plaque:] “To the Defenders Of Fort Moultrie June The 28th . . . — Map (db m19167) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — U.S. Custom House
Entered on the National Register of Historic Places October 9, 1974 U.S. Custom House Charleston, South Carolina Ammi Burnham Young E. B. White Architects 1853 This property significantly contributes . . . — Map (db m19126) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — USS Pringle (DD-477)
Launched at Charleston, S.C. on May 2, 1942 Lost to Enemy Action off Okinawa on April 16,1945 In Memoriam Vella Lavella - August 21, 1943 John Villani • Ernest F. Whitehead Mindoro - December 30, 1944 James F. Bennett • . . . — Map (db m19170) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Walker, Evans & Cogswell Company
Distinguished for Achievement as Stationers, Book Binders, and Printers, Since its founding in 1821 by John C. Walker. Appointed Lithographers and Printers to The Confederate Government in 1861. The company in this building produced stamps, Bank . . . — Map (db m19667) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — William Gilmore Simms
William Gilmore Simms 1806 - 1879 Author, Journalist, Historian — Map (db m19169) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Channel 2 & Suzie Q
[Side A] In 1954, Drayton Hastie, owner of WUSN, purchased Suzie Q, an Asian elephant, for $2,700 from a New York importer. A gimmick to lure viewers from WCSC, Suzie Q became QUSN's mascot in residence sharing the grounds with an . . . — Map (db m19100) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Milton's Ferry Tavern
By 1832, Milton's Ferry offered a ferry service to and from Charleston by way of a canal dug through the marsh. The ferry tavern was a two-sided house with stables and carriage houses to serve travelers. A bi-weekly stage ran from the tavern to . . . — Map (db m19099) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum/The Medal of Honor Museum
Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum The South Carolina General Assembly passed legislation in 1973 enabling the establishment of the Patriots Point Authority to develop a portion of Hog Island as a national naval museum. The museum . . . — Map (db m19200) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — 10-32 — Rifle Range Road
A U.S. Navy rifle range was built near here during World War I on the site of an old S.C. National Guard firing range. Included were 100 targets, 2 armories, a 600-seat mess hall, 12 barracks and auxiliary buildings. After 1918 the 100-acre site . . . — Map (db m19116) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Shem Creek
The name of this deepwater tidal creek is derived from the Indian word "Shemee." The creek has been an important site for shipbuilding, fishing, transportation, and milling industries since the early 1700's. Shem Creek also was known as Sullivan's, . . . — Map (db m75234) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Silas N. Pearman Tower
The Silas N. Pearman Bridge Named to Commemprate The former Cheif Highway Commissioner The Pearman Bridge (Modeled Here) Spanned the Cooper River from 1966 to 2005. Built by the South Carolina Dapartment of Transportation Designed by . . . — Map (db m19215) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Talos Missile
The Talos Series of shipborn missiles was one of the most powerful in the U.S. Navy. It's main function was anti-aircraft for fleet defense. But later versions had surface-to-surface capability. Range: Over 75 miles Speed Mach 2.5 Weight: . . . — Map (db m19217) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — Vaughn Edward Kee — August 13, 1960 - December 13, 1985
On December 13, 1985, at 2:35 am, Mount Pleasant Officer Kee stopped an intoxicated driver near this site. During the traffic stop, a second intoxicated driver struck officer Kee as he stood near his patrol car. Officer Kee gave his life to protect . . . — Map (db m19113) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mt. Pleasant — Cold War Submarine Memorial — 1947 - 1989
A Tribute to Professional Excellence Dedication, Sacrifice, and National Will Our submarines went to sea a silent invisible force solemnly dedicated to maintaining peace, but ready to fight if necessary to defend our nation and allies . . . — Map (db m19581) WM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — 1860 Flanking Caponniere
On the fort wall you can see the outline of a doorway and traces of two walls that tied into the brick on either side of it. This is all that remains of one of two structures built by the United States in garrison in 1860 to protect the fort's low . . . — Map (db m19832) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — 10-46 — Battle of Fort Sullivan
[Side A] On June 28, 1776, a British and Loyalist force seeking to capture Charleston advanced to Sullivan's Island with 9 ships and 2,500-3,000 infantry. The American defenders, 435 men under Col. William Moultrie of the 2nd S.C. . . . — Map (db m19122) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — Civil War Armament — 1861 - 1865
The row of cannon in front of you dates from the Civil War, when radical advances in technology increased power, range, and accuracy. Union armories produced new, larger rifled cannon; the South had few foundries and used existing weapons, often . . . — Map (db m19245) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — Civilian Conservation Corps
Marker Front:Civilian Conservation Corps March 31, 1933 to June 30, 1942 The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established by the 73rd Congress in order to put young men to work restoring the natural resources of this country . . . — Map (db m19119) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — 10-27 — CS H.L. Hunley
(Side A) The CS H.L. HUNLEY, the first submarine to sink an enemy warship, left from a point near here on the evening of February 17, 1864, and proceeded out Breach Inlet toward the USS HOUSATONIC, anchored nearby. The . . . — Map (db m19124) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — Fort Moultrie
Military reservation Named in Honor of Col. William Moultrie who commanded Fort Sullivan (now Fort Moultrie) comprising the 2nd South Carolina Regiment of infantry and a detachment of the 4th South Carolina Regiment (Artillery) during the . . . — Map (db m19125) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — Sergeant Jasper
A Memorial to the Valor of Sergeant Jasper who at Fort Moultrie on June 28, 1776 gallantly rescued his regimental flag during heavy cannonading by the British Fleet under Sir Peter Parker . . . — Map (db m19120) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — This is Sullivan's Island
A place where...Africans were brought to this country under extreme conditions of human bondage and degradation. Tens of thousands of captives arrived on Sullivan's Island from the West African shores between 1700 and 1775. Those who remained in . . . — Map (db m19123) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivan's Island — African American Cemetery
[Marker Front]: In this cemetery are the remains of some of Sullivan's Island's original Islanders, people of predominantly African American descent whose history parallels that of the Island. Buried here are Carpenters, Cooks, . . . — Map (db m19117) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — A Race for the Grasshopper
Near the end of the battle, as the Americans swept forward, two Continental officers sought to capture the enemy's light 3-pounder "grasshopper" cannons. Captain Anderson of Maryland won the race when he used his spontoon to vault forward onto . . . — Map (db m13029) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Battle of Cowpens Monument
South Inscription: The Congress of the United States has caused this Monument to be erected on the site of the Battle of Cowpens as a testimonial to the valor and in appreciation of the services of the American Troops on this field in . . . — Map (db m11186) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Cherokee County Veterans Monument
World War I Allen, Landrum • Allen, Loyd • Bobo, Jesse • Burgess, Arthur • Camp, Oscar • Chesney, Coke T. • Collins, Ed • Crocker, Alexander • Dickson, Leander T. • Dowdle, Glenn • Edwards, Arthur • Ellis, Grier • Gallman, Richard . . . — Map (db m11166) WM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order
After firing twice, the militia retreated behind the Continentals who were awaiting the British advance in this area. British reinforcements, Fraser's 71st Highlanders, threatened the Continentals' right flank. Lt. Col. Howard ordered his right . . . — Map (db m13031) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Double Envelopment
On this field, the Continentals blunted the British advance, then charged with bayonets flashing. Cavalry hit the left and right of the 71st. The militia reformed and surged against the right and left. British troops found themselves overwhelmed . . . — Map (db m13030) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Form the Line of Battle
Today Tarleton's force would be called a combined arms task force. It contained all the elements to conduct a quick movement and "engage an enemy." Ranks of redcoated fusiliers, regulars, and raw recruits of the 7th Regiment formed in this . . . — Map (db m13423) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — From Cow Pasture to Battlefield
The view seen beyond was a frontier pasturing ground, known locally as the Cow Pens. The name came from the custom of wintering cattle in the lush area around Thicketty Mountain. General Daniel Morgan chose this ground for its tactical . . . — Map (db m126716) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — January 17, 1781 — A Decisive American Victory Fought in Less than One Hour
The British soldiers arrived at the Cow Pens about dawn. The right flank of the British army formed in this general area with the rest of the troops stretching across the Green River Road. Ahead, in the distance, Morgan's army awaited. — Map (db m11356) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Let 'em Get Within Killin' Distance
The American second line of defense stood in position here. About sunrise,the British appeared. The militia, though not trained to stand against massed British bayonets, fought well and shot with deadly effect. "At first it was pop, pop, pop . . . — Map (db m77693) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Morgan's Flying Army
Morgan's army came from many states-the two Carolinas, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, and Virginia. They were joined by the militia, some of whom had helped destroy the British army of loyalist Americans under Ferguson at Kings Mountain. They . . . — Map (db m13035) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Race to the Dan River
General Morgan's army secured a great victory on the field before you: "Our loss was inconsiderable, not having more than twelve killed and sixty wounded. The enemy's loss was 10 commissioned officers and over 100 rank and file killed and 200 . . . — Map (db m13034) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Sharpshooters at the Skirmish Line
The sharpshooters at the skirmish line waited until Tarleton's army got within shooting distance. Their orders were to slow Tarleton's advance with well-aimed rifle fire and then fall back to the militia second line. As the British came within range . . . — Map (db m13065) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Skirmishers Retreat, British Advance
After firing as ordered, the American skirmishers melted back to the second line of defense. Seeing this, the British troops moved forward at quickstep, raising a great shout as they advanced. — Map (db m13028) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Spirit up the People
"Sir-you are appointed to the command of a corps of Light Infantry, a detachment of Militia, and Lt. Col. Washington's Regiment of Light Dragoons...The object of this detachment is to give protection to that part of the country and spirit up . . . — Map (db m13061) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Sword Clash on Green River Road
Nearby, retreating British officers of the 17th Light Dragoons, clashed with pursuing American horsemen led by Lt. Col. William Washington. He quickly outpaced his troops, broke his weapon at the hilt when he got into a sword fight with a British . . . — Map (db m13025) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — The British Army
British commander, Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton, ordered a detachment of cavalry forward to scatter the American skirmishers. The green-uniformed British Legion - Americans loyal to the king - awaited the order to advance. — Map (db m11357) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — The Cavalry (Dragoons) at Cowpens
The open forests proved well-suited for cavalry action. Fast-moving, hard-hitting mounted troops called Light Dragoons bolstered the 18th century infantry. At least seventy South Carolina and Georgia mounted militiamen, armed with pistols and . . . — Map (db m13063) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — The Continental Army at Cowpens
This line consisted of Continentals from Maryland and Delaware as well as militia from Virginia and North Carolina. Seasoned veterans under Lt. Col. John Eager Howard of Maryland, they had served at least one year and were Morgan's most reliable . . . — Map (db m13064) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail
The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail preserves and commemorates the route of Patriot militia during the 1780 Kings Mountain campaign. During that historic event, on October 6, 1780, American forces stopped here at the Cow Pens to rest . . . — Map (db m108660) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — The Robert Scruggs House
Robert Scruggs married Catherine Connell, and in 1828 his father, Richard Scruggs, gave them 200 acres of land. They had eleven children and added onto the house as the family grew. Life at the time was hard; yeomen farmers raised corn, . . . — Map (db m126717) HM
South Carolina (Cherokee County), Gaffney — Washington Light Infantry Monument
This Monument was erected by The Washington Light Infantry Of Charleston S.C. L.M. Hatch. Capt April. 1856 Cowpens Chapter D.A.R. 1936 — Map (db m13385) HM
South Carolina (Florence County), Florence — 21-26 — Atomic Bomb Accident at Mars Bluff, March 11, 1958
[Marker Front] In 1958, in the midst of the Cold War, the U.S. Air Force accidentally dropped an atomic bomb near here. The unarmed 7,600-lb., 10'8"-long bomb was aboard a B-47E bomber on a training mission headed for England. Its . . . — Map (db m23628) HM
South Carolina (Florence County), Florence — 21 10 — Christ Episcopal Church
Marker front: First organized as a chapel in 1843 by the Rev. N.P. Tillinghast of Trinity Church, Society Hill, this church was formally established as Christ Church, Mars Bluff, in 1856. The Rev. Augustus Moore, who took over the chapel in . . . — Map (db m20488) HM
South Carolina (Florence County), Florence — 21 21 — William H. Johnson Birthplace
Marker Front: William Henry Johnson (1901-1970), one of the most important African-American artists of the 20th century, was born nearby on Cox Street. His family later lived on the corner of Cheves and Kemp Streets. In 1918, at the age of . . . — Map (db m20490) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Point of View
The View from the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area Located in northwestern South Carolina. The Blue Ridge Escarpment ends with an abrupt drop of some 2,000 feet to the foothills below, where the state's Piedmont region begins. The escarpment . . . — Map (db m12533) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Tommy Wyche
. . . — Map (db m12470) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Beattie E. Huff Highway
That part of U.S. 25 between Saluda Dam Road and U.S. 276 Named in 1986 by action of the General Assembly and highway commission in recognition of his 24 years of dedicated service to Greenville County and South Carolina as . . . — Map (db m17792) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Crenshaw's Battery — Charles L. Crenshaw, Jr 1921-2002
This authentic 12-pound brass Napoleon, a favorite of the Confederate artillery, was constructed by Charles Crenshaw Jr. Gharlie co-founded the "Southern Guns of Thunder" and for years built and fired cannons to lend a thunderous salute at memorial . . . — Map (db m56844) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Eighty Unnamed Soldiers
In Grateful Memory of Eighty Unnamed Soldiers of The Southern Confederacy Whose Remains Lie Buried In This Block — Map (db m13480) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-24 — Fountain Fox Beattie House / Greenville Women's Club
Fountain Fox Beattie House This house, built in 1834, first stood a few blocks south on East North St. It was built by Fountain Fox Beattie (1807-1863), a textile merchant, for his new bride Emily Edgeworth Hamlin. Their son Hamlin Beattie . . . — Map (db m11036) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Fred W. Symmes Hall of Science
This Hall of Science is Dedicated to the Memory of Fred W. Symmes 1879-1957 Textile Manufacturer, Public Servant, Seeker after Knowledge, who throughout a long life labored unceasingly for the cause of Education Constructed through the . . . — Map (db m10981) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — General Robert E. Lee
A tribute to the memory of General Robert E Lee "His monument is the Adoration of the South, his shrine is in every Southern Heart." Thomas Nelson Page. Erected 1935 By the Greenville Chapter and Fort Sumter Chapter of the United . . . — Map (db m10778) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville County Veterans Memorial / Greenville County Medal of Honor
[Veterans Memorial]: Veterans Memorial WWI 1917-1918 WWII 1941-1946 Korea 1950-1955 Military Branch Seals: United States Army, United States Marine Corps, United States Navy, United States Air Force, United States Coast Guard, . . . — Map (db m19842) WM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Herbert C. Granger Interchange
Named by action of the General Assembly and Highway Commission in recognition of his distinguished public service during 24 years as a member of South Carolina House of Representatives and in particular his role in the . . . — Map (db m19489) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Kershaw Brigade
Erected by the City of Greenville, South Carolina in commemoration of the "Project Southland" Monument erected on the Gettysburg Battlefield honoring The Kershaw Brigade of South Carolina. ————— A . . . — Map (db m10779) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Major Rudolf Anderson Jr.
Dedicated to Major Rudolf Anderson Jr. U.S.A.F. Sept. 15, 1927 - Oct. 27, 1962 By the Citizens of Greenville State of South Carolina The United States of America In a period of great international stress he performed this duty of . . . — Map (db m11059) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Pelham Mill — The Buena Vista Factory, Hutchings Factory, Lester Factory
• First Textile Mill in Greenville County. • Site used for textile manufacturing from 1820-1935. • The mortared stone dam spanning the Enoree River was built with six sluice gates in the 1880's. Rocky Field Creek runs from the North to the . . . — Map (db m51061) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Second Baptist Church World War II Memorial
In Honor and Memory Of the Members of the Second Baptist Church who served in World War II Herman A Arrowood - Fred A Johnson Willard W. Batson - J.Clyde Jones R.Douglas Bishop - Glover Y.Jones Hubert E.Bishop - Ray F.Jones Charles . . . — Map (db m51277) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 23 — Oak Ridge
In 1943, Oak Ridge was created as the residential center for the Clinton Engineering Works. Located on the northeast corner of a 59,000-acre reservation acquired by the government in 1942, the community was designed by Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill, . . . — Map (db m81358) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C 22 — Grace Moore
Born in a house which stood just across the creek, on Dec. 5, 1901, she was educated at Ward Belmont College, in Nashville, and after further musical study in Washington and New York, she became one of the outstanding operatic sopranos of her day. . . . — Map (db m40736) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C 73 — John Floyd Arrowood — 1891-1925
Born two miles west April 1891, Arrowood was one of the first American soldiers to be decorated for bravery in World War I. The French government, on Nov. 14, 1917, awarded him the Croix de Guerre for the rescue of several men under his . . . — Map (db m40735) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C2 — Tennessee / North Carolina
(obverse) Tennessee Cocke County Established 1797, named in honor of SENATOR WILLIAM COCKE (1796, 1797, 1799 to 1805) An officer of the Revolutionary Army; one of the leaders of the State of Franklin and member of the . . . — Map (db m40739) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C 57 — Governor Ben Walter Hooper
Born in Newport on October 13, 1870, Hooper was a successful Cocke County attorney. He was elected governor and served two terms, 1911-15. His election is attributed to the influence of fusion, the coalition of the prohibition factions of both . . . — Map (db m61778) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — 2 C 20 — Kemmer Stand / Tavern
In 1817, John Kemmer purchased land here and built Kemmer Stand, a wayside inn, at the intersection of Burke Road. It was two-story, two-section structure that housed many travelers traversing the Cumberland Plateau. At the crest of this hill lies . . . — Map (db m18194) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Andrew Johnson — National Historic Site — Andrew Johnson National Cemetery
Welcome to the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site. This site commemorates the life and work of the seventeenth president of the United States, Andrew Johnson. Born in poverty, Johnson rose from Greeneville tailor to the nation's highest office. . . . — Map (db m23680) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Andrew Johnson Homestead
The Andrew Johnson Homestead was the last home of Andrew Johnson (1808-1875), 17th President of the United States (1865-1869). Congressman Andrew Johnson purchased the house and half-acre lot from James Brannan in September 1851. Built directly upon . . . — Map (db m23679) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 53 — Benjamin Lundy
Here from 1822-1824 Lundy, a Quaker, published the "Genius of Universal Emancipation," a small monthly paper devoted exclusively to the abolition of slavery. While here he also published a weekly paper, the "Economist and Political Recorder." After . . . — Map (db m23121) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 70 — Capitol of State of Franklin
This is a replica of the building which is believed to have served as the capitol of the State of Franklin from 1785 until 1788 and which originally stood near the intersection of Main and Depot Streets. At constitutional conventions held there, . . . — Map (db m81608) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan — "... bring Morgan out dead or alive."
On September 3-4, 1864, Lt.Col. William H. Ingerton led the 13th Tennessee Cavalry (USA) to Greeneville's outskirts, where he learned that Gen.John Hunt Morgan was at the Dickson-Williams Mansion. He told his company commanders, Capts. C.C. Wilcox . . . — Map (db m23081) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 76 — Dickson - Williams Mansion
Designed and constructed (1815-21) by Irish craftsmen Thomas Battersby and John Hoy, this house was built by Greeneville's first postmaster, William Dickson, for his daughter, Catharine (Mrs.Alexander Williams). Marquis de LaFayette, Presidents . . . — Map (db m81610) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 59 — First Presbyterian Church
Founded in 1780 under the trees at the Big Spring by the Rev. Samuel Doak, it was originally called Mount Bethel Presbyterian Church. The first settled pastor was the Rev. Hezekiah Balch in 1783. Fifteen years later the name was changed to . . . — Map (db m23027) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 77 — General Morgan Inn
The Grand Central was constructed as a "railroad hotel," from 1887 to 1890. From 1908 to 1981, it operated as Hotel Brumley. Carefully restored under the supervision of seven historic preservation agencies, including the National Trust for . . . — Map (db m23080) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 7 — Greene County / Hawkins County
Greene County Established 1783 named in honor of Nathanael Greene Major General in the Revolutionary Army. After fighting at Trenton, the Brandywine & Germantown, and serving at Valley Forge, he became Quarter-master General of the Army. He later . . . — Map (db m23035) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Greene County Civil War
(Front):To the memory of the Union Soldiers who Enlisted in the Union Army From Greene County War 1861-1865 (Side):In the hour of their country's peril they were loyal and true. (Side):Erected by the Union Soldiers' . . . — Map (db m81611) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 58 — Greeneville Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Rev. Isaac S. Bonham founded the congregation with thirty charter members in 1841. The present church was begun in 1860 on land purchased from Andrew Johnson by Rev. John P. Holtsinger. The church was shelled on September 4, 1864, the day . . . — Map (db m23002) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 54 — Greeneville Union Convention
On June 17, 1861, delegates from every East Tennessee county except Rhea convened here for four days. The purpose was to keep East Tennessee in the Union after secession of the state. Leaders of the movement were Thomas D. Arnold, William G. . . . — Map (db m81612) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 61 — Harmony House
Built in 1851 by Dr. and Mrs. William Andrew Harmon, this house was used as a place of refuge during the Civil War. Soldiers from both Confederate and Union armies camped in the back yard. Of Federal architecture, the interior contains prime . . . — Map (db m22997) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — John H. Morgan — 1825 - 1864 — The Thunderbolt of the Confederacy
First lieutenant, Marshal's Regiment of Cavalry in the Mexican War Captain the "Lexington Rifles" 1857 captain Company A of the Kentucky Cavalry 1861. Colonel 2nd Kentucky Cavalry 1862 Brigadier General appointed from Tennessee December 11, 1862. . . . — Map (db m23031) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 78 — McKee Street "Flagship of Greeneville Mayoralty"
Eleven mayors of Greeneville resided in the 100 block of McKee Street while serving in office. At interval periods between the years of 1873 and 1972, the following individuals served: Robert M. McKee, N.T. Howard, Tom T. Adams, H.E. Holland, John . . . — Map (db m23034) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 52 — Old Harmony Graveyard
This burying ground, established in 1791 in connection with Harmony Presbyterian Church, contains the graves of the Scotch-Irish Covenanters who established Greeneville in 1783. Among these are Dr. Hezekiah Balch, Dr. Charles Coffin, William . . . — Map (db m23124) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 29 — Robert Kerr
On this site originally stood the house of Robert Kerr, where were held sessions of the Upper House of the State of Franklin. The first sessions of Greene County's Court were also held here. The Baptist church, established in 1872, was moved to its . . . — Map (db m22999) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 71 — Sgt. Elbert L. Kinser
For conspicuous gallantry as a leader of a First Marine Division Rifle Platoon on Okinawa Shima on May 4, 1945, this Greene County native was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously by President Harry S. Truman. Attacked by Japanese forces, Sgt. . . . — Map (db m23029) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 63 — The Big Spring
The site of Greeneville was a juncture of two Indian trails, and the presence of the Big Spring furnished a stopping off place for the weary Indian traveler. The Scotch-Irish pioneers made the spring the reason for the founding of . . . — Map (db m23001) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — The Dickson - Williams Mansion — A House Divided
The Federal-style mansion in front of you was the home of Catharine Dickson Williams and Dr. Alexander Williams. Catharine Williams, a famous Greeneville hostess, counted Presidents Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson among her guests. . . . — Map (db m81613) HM
Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — 1C 65 — Valentine Sevier Home
Oldest house standing in Greeneville. Built circa 1795 by Valentine Sevier, wealthy political leader and philanthropist of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it was later owned by President Andrew Johnson. After the War Between the States it . . . — Map (db m81614) HM
Virginia, Bristol — Civil War Memorial
Presented by Col. J.M.Barker of Bristol, Tenn. to the Chapter of the U.D.C. in memory of the brave men and noble women of Tennessee and Virginia from 1861 to 1865 — Map (db m23143) HM
Virginia, Bristol — K-43 — Historic Bristol
Evan Shelby, noted Indian fighter, settled here about 1765 on a tract called "Sapling Grove". His home was a neighborhood fort, the refuge of settlers in Indian attacks. Bristol grew around this place and became an early railroad center. — Map (db m24323) HM

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