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Elijah Baker Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bernard Fisher, February 17, 2014
Elijah Baker Marker
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — “For God’s Sake, Save That Battery” The 38th Indiana at PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The 436 members of the 38th Indiana Infantry Regiment deployed here, in a cut cornfield, next to the 10th Wisconsin Infantry. These men supported Captain Peter Simonson’s six cannon, which were located to your right. It was a crucial position; along . . . — Map (db m46482) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — “If You Meet the Enemy, Overpower Him”Perryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
About 4 PM on October 8, Colonel Samuel Powell was ordered to move his brigade westward and discover how many Federal troops were stationed west of Perryville. His 1,000-man force dutifully advanced along the Springfield Pike (today US 150 and 4th . . . — Map (db m46416) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 80th IndianaPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The inexperienced 80th Indiana Infantry Regiment was part of Union Colonel George Webster’s brigade. This unit included the 50th, 98th, and 121st Ohio infantry regiments and the 19th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery, commanded by Captain Samuel . . . — Map (db m88692) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 9-A — Act of MercyPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The Battle of Perryville was a fierce fight for the members of the 79th Pennsylvania Infantry. Fighting in these fields, this unit suffered 40 killed, 146 wounded, and 30 missing. This represents a loss of more than fifty percent of the . . . — Map (db m46476) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Artillery Duel at Loomis HeightsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Before the Confederate infantry attacked, the Southern army tried to weaken the Federal position by bombarding the Union lines with artillery fire. At noon, Captain William Carnes’ Confederate artillery battery took up position on one of the far . . . — Map (db m46487) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Assault from the Bottom HousePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
They were outnumbered, but they were ready. Watching from the top of the hill across the road, members of the 3rd Ohio Infantry Regiment saw waves of attacking Confederate infantry moving toward them. These Federal soldiers, anchoring the southern . . . — Map (db m46491) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Assault on Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Maney’s Confederates immediately discovered the lethal danger of attacking the eight Union cannon on top of the ridge in front of you. The Confederates sought cover behind a split-rail fence, but the Union artillery shattered the rails, killing and . . . — Map (db m46469) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 553 — Battle of PerryvilleOctober 8, 1862
(left panel) The battle was brought on by Confederate Lieut. Gen. Braxton Bragg as a delaying action to insure safe withdrawal of a huge wagon train of supplies and to enable him to effect a junction with the army of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby . . . — Map (db m46239) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Bragg's Invasion of Kentucky
The Confederate Army’s advance into Kentucky in 1862 was initiated to relieve Tennessee of Union control, to align the help of dissatisfied Kentuckians and to gain access to the rich supplies Kentucky offered. General Kirby Smith entered . . . — Map (db m46404) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Confederate CemeteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When the Battle of Perryville ended, hundreds of dead soldiers were left on the battlefield. The Confederates, who attacked the Union battle lines, lost 532 killed, 2,641 wounded, and 228 missing (3,401 total). Federal losses were just as . . . — Map (db m46421) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 193 — Crawford House
Used by Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg as headquarters during the Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. Crawford Spring, back of the house, furnished vital water supply to CSA troops on the drought stricken battlefield. — Map (db m46248) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Loomis’ HeightsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
In 1862, the ravine in front of you was planted in corn, the fields recently cut and harvested. Here, on this ridge, the Union soldiers established a strong defensive position. Two brigades and six cannon awaited the Confederate attack. With a . . . — Map (db m46485) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Union Brigadier General William Terrill was nearly panic-stricken. To his surprise, thousands of Confederates swarmed over the fields in front of you, moving toward the Federal lines. The shouts of attacking Southern troops and the crescendo of . . . — Map (db m46470) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As Maney’s Confederates reached the top of this hill they watched the fleeing Union soldiers retreat into the valley in front of you. The Southerners had lost hundreds of men killed and wounded during the fight to take this ridge, and their hearts . . . — Map (db m46471) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 24 — Dixville CrossroadsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
During the Battle of Perryville, the Dixville Crossroads, the intersection in front of you, was a crucial tactical point on the battlefield. Here, the Benton Road (now called Whites Road), which runs to Dixville in Mercer County, intersects the . . . — Map (db m46492) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson PersistsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When Donelson’s shattered regiments reached this position, nearly half of his men had been killed and wounded. Despite the appalling casualties, the Confederate attack continued to the west. With Donelson’s 16th Tennessee Infantry Regiment . . . — Map (db m46480) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson's AdvancePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When Donelson’s brigade moved into this valley, they were met with a deadly surprise. The rolling terrain had prevented the Confederates from seeing all of the Union troop positions. When the Confederates reached this valley, they became trapped in . . . — Map (db m46481) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Confederate Brigadier General Daniel Donelson had been given great responsibility. His brigade was to open the Confederate attack by assaulting the northern end of the Union defensive line. Once Donelson’s brigade moved forward, other Southern . . . — Map (db m46430) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — First Settlement of PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The area around this cave was the site of Perryville’s original settlement, Harbison’s Station. Named for its founder, James Harbison, the station was settled in the 1770s. Harbison and the group of Virginians traveling with him chose this location . . . — Map (db m46419) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Illinois Soldiers at Perryville
The Fifty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, commanded by Maj. Joshua Winters, here suffered 113 casualties of 325 engaged. The Seventy-fifth Illinois, Lieut. Col. John E. Bennett, lost 225 of 700. Serving with Col. Michael Gooding's Thirteenth Brigade, the . . . — Map (db m46356) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — IntroductionPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The Battle of Perryville In the summer of 1862, Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s Army of the Mississippi invaded Kentucky. Bragg hoped to enlist recruits, pull Union troops out of Tennessee, and hold Kentucky for the Confederacy. With . . . — Map (db m46422) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 876 — Karrick-Parks House / Harberson's Station
(obverse) Karrick-Parks House Bivouac for Confederate troops on Oct. 7, 1862, night before Battle of Perryville. Karricks ordered to vacate home the next day. Day after the battle they returned to survey damage, found little done. . . . — Map (db m46396) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Maney's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Confederate Brigadier General George Maney was growing concerned. On the hill to your front, eight Union cannon blasted away, killing and wounding dozens of Southern soldiers. Maney knew that his brigade had to take the hill and quickly silence . . . — Map (db m46467) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 2223 — Merchants' Row / Street Fighting
(obverse) Merchants' Row Originally known as Main St., the town's historic commercial center renamed Buell St. to honor Union general D.C. Buell. Now called Merchants' Row, most buildings built 1830-40. Temperance leader Carrie . . . — Map (db m46399) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — S555C — Michigan at Perryville
(side 1) Among the 61,000 Union soldiers who at the Battle of Perryville ended Confederate attempts to gain control of Kentucky were six Michigan units. The most heavily engaged of these were Coldwater’s Loomis Battery (Battery A of the . . . — Map (db m46357) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryvile and the Emancipation Proclamation
In mid-1862, President Abraham Lincoln wrestled with the idea of issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. With Confederate armies pressing into Maryland and Kentucky, Lincoln realized that he could not issue the Proclamation until the Union secured a . . . — Map (db m46363) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 1284 — Perryville
Established as Harberson's Fort before 1783 by James Harberson, Thomas Walker, Daniel Ewing and others at the crossroads of Danville-Louisville and Harrodsburg-Nashville routes. Town laid out by Edward Bullock and William Hall, 1815, named for . . . — Map (db m46400) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryville Confederate Memorial
(front, south) Confederate Memorial Nor braver bled for a brighter land, no brighter land had a cause so grand. (side, east) On flames eternal camping ground their tents are spread. And glory guards with solemn round . . . — Map (db m68664) WM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryville in the Crucible of WarPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As the Union and Confederate armies deployed around Perryville on October 7 and 8, the city’s inhabitants found themselves caught in the middle. Many residents fled the town in haste, taking whatever belongings they could collect. Other civilians . . . — Map (db m46417) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 194 — Russell House
On the knoll, it was a key position on the Union left flank under Maj. Gen. McCook in Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. The scene of desperate fighting, it changed hands twice and was hit many times. After the battle it was used as a hospital. — Map (db m46355) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — SanctuaryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As fighting raged, Union soldiers in Brigadier General William Terrill’s brigade were driven from the ridge and the split rail fence in front of you. Most of these troops had never been in combat. This inexperience sometimes led men and officers to . . . — Map (db m46484) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Sgt. Harris B. Cope Memorial
(base) Dedicated to the memory of Sgt. Harris B. Cope Company G 16th Tennessee Infantry who fell in the fields ahead October 8, 1862 (top) Donelson’s Brigade The brigade of Brig. Gen. Daniel S. Donelson . . . — Map (db m46420) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 17 — Simonson’s BatteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The six guns of Union Captain Peter Simonson’s 5th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery were posted on this ridge. These Hoosiers had a commanding view of the Confederate advance, and their battery anchored the center of the Union battle line. . . . — Map (db m46486) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Soldiers' Reaction to Lincoln's Emancipation
Whether a soldier was Union or Confederate in his loyalties during the Civil War, there was not a unified reaction to Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary or official Emancipation Proclamation. The individual reaction varied on either side of this . . . — Map (db m46364) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Starkweather’s HillPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Their faces and hands begrimed from the smoke of battle, and their ears ringing with the constant ripping of musketry, Starkweather’s shattered brigade retreated to the ridge in front of you. They had saved several cannon, pushing them back to a new . . . — Map (db m46473) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Starkweather's HillPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As Union Colonel John Starkweather stood on this hill, watching Terrill’s brigade retreat, he realized the importance of his position. With its twelve cannon, Starkweather’s brigade stood as the only Federal defense between the attacking . . . — Map (db m46475) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Stewart's AdvancePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The battle opened with great fury. To your left, Donelson's brigade hurled themselves against the Union lines, but their attack momentarily stalled. In the fields to your right, Maney's Confederate brigade also assaulted the Federal position. . . . — Map (db m46432) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Stewart's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Wedged between Donelson’s and Maney’s brigades, Stewart’s Confederates continued their advance. Two Union infantry regiments initially held this area, but Stewart’s attack hurled them back. There was more work to be done. From the second ridge . . . — Map (db m46478) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The 15th Kentucky Infantry (US)Perryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
On the ridge to your right front and across the paved road fought the 15th Kentucky Infantry (US). The 15th was recruited in the fall of 1861 from northern Kentucky and the Louisville area. At Perryville the regiment (part of Colonel William Lytle’s . . . — Map (db m46490) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The Battle of Perryville
The Battle of Perryville was fought on October 8, 1862. It was the climax of a campaign that lasted almost two months and affected the entire state of Kentucky. The campaign started when Edmund Kirby Smith’s Confederate army entered Kentucky on . . . — Map (db m46372) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The City of PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The area that became Perryville was first settled between 1776 and 1780 by a group of Virginians led by James Harbison. The settlement became known as Harbison’s Station, and a stockade was built around a cave that exists today behind 403 South . . . — Map (db m46415) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The CornfieldPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
During the Battle of Perryville, a field of ten-foot high cornstalks, brown and dry from a severe drought, covered this valley. Obscured among the corn, 800 members of the 21st Wisconsin Infantry Regiment waited. In the army for less than a month, . . . — Map (db m46472) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The Dye HousePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
In 1860, a forty-three year-old farmer named John Dye lived here with his wife, Elizabeth, their four children, and six slaves. The 120-acre farm produced hay, corn, and wheat, and the family also had a few cows, horses, and mules. Two years . . . — Map (db m46405) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 5b — Turner's BatteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When General Maney’s Confederates attacked the Union left flank, located on the ridge in front of you, a Confederate artillery battery commanded by Lieutenant William Turner took position here. To support Maney’s advance, Tuner’s four cannon rained . . . — Map (db m46468) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — A Boom for CumberlandThe National Road Meets the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad — The Historic National Road / The Road That Built The Nation
The National Road and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad came together at this spot in 1842 at Cumberland’s first railroad station. For a few years, it was necessary for passengers and freight to transfer from railroad cars to coach and wagon for the . . . — Map (db m81402) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Capture of Generals B.F. Kelly and George CrookNights, February 21–22, 1865
A company of Confederates, young men from Cumberland, Maryland, Hampshire and Hardy Counties, West Virginia, captured several picket posts, obtained the countersign “Bulls Gap,” rode into the city, captured two commanding Union Generals, . . . — Map (db m81416) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Christ's (St. Paul's) Lutheran Church
A building on this site Christ's (St. Paul's) Lutheran Church May 11, 1794 "Mother of Lutheranism" in Allegany Co. — Map (db m81506) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Merry Hill — A 49 — "Scotch Hall"
Plantation setting for the novel "Bertie," by George R. Throop (1851), tutor in the family of Geo. W. Capehart. House built 1838 is 8 mi. S.E. — Map (db m56987) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Merry Hill — A-10 — Salmon Creek and Eden House: Seedbed of the Colony
Along the banks of the Chowan River and Salmon Creek, the seeds were planted for the colony and state of North Carolina. From these roots in the 1600s emerged the refined plantation life of the ruling colonial gentry in the 1700s, made possible by . . . — Map (db m56927) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — A 74 — "Windsor Castle"
Built 1858 by Patrick H. Winston, Jr. Birthplace of sons George T., educator; Francis D., lt. gov., 1905-1909; & Robert W., writer. 100 yards east. — Map (db m60651) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Bertie County Confederate Monument
. . . — Map (db m60728) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — A 7 — David Stone
Governor, 1808-10; U.S. Senator; Congressman. "Hope," his home, stands 4 miles northwest. — Map (db m60650) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Eden House Root Cellar
In the days before electricity and refrigerators, many people built a kind of half-basement under a home or shed called a “root cellar” to store food. The natural insulation of the ground lets root cellars maintain a fairly constant . . . — Map (db m60732) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Engagement at WindsorAction on the Cashie River
To disrupt Confederate recruiting efforts here in Windsor, the Bertie County seat, three Federal transports steamed from Plymouth on the night of January 29, 1864, under U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Charles W Flusser. USS Whitehead and USS . . . — Map (db m60627) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Gray’s Landing
William Gray in 1776 set aside 100 acres at Gray’s Landing for establishing a town. 18th century travelers would have disembarked from sailing vessels docked at the foot of King Street at the old Gray’s Landing site. Visitors to Windsor today, . . . — Map (db m60629) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Historic Windsor
Created by an act of Colonial Assembly in 1768, New Windsor was established on the site known as Gray’s Landing. A part of grants to the Lords Proprietors, 2800 acres on the Cashie River were sold in 1717 by John Lord Carteret, Earl of Granville to . . . — Map (db m60630) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — A 36 — Locke Craig1860-1925
Governor, 1913-1917; teacher, lawyer, state legislator. His birthplace is one mile N.E. — Map (db m60652) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — A 57 — Naval Battle, 1864
The Confederate ironclad ram Albemarle, led by Capt. J.W. Cooke, crossed Batchelor's Bay, May 5, 1864, and fought seven Union warships 15 mi. E. — Map (db m56990) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Roanoke/Cashie River Center Grave Site
These graves were discovered during site preparation for Roanoke/Cashie River Center. They were overgrown with vines and shrubs, and had not been tended in many years. One grave dates to 1884. No date is found on the other headstone. . . . — Map (db m60733) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — The Battle of WindsorJanuary 30, 1864
Acting on orders from General Robert E. Lee in the winter of 1863-64, Confederate forces under the command of Major General George E. Pickett were deployed throughout eastern North Carolina preparatory to as an attempt at clearing the enemy from the . . . — Map (db m60628) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Wellington and Powell Railroad
This brick vault was once housed in the depot of the Wellington and Powell Railroad. The W&P ran between Windsor and Ahoskie in the early to mid 1900’s carrying produce and passengers. There was a hill on the train’s route it often had . . . — Map (db m60730) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — A 41 — William Blount
Member of Continental Congress, signer of the Federal Constitution, governor S.W. Territory, Senator from Tennessee. Birthplace 1/5 mi. S.W. — Map (db m60649) HM
North Carolina (Camden County), Camden — Camden County Courthouse
Built in 1847, the historic Camden County Courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. "A jewel among the state's Greek Revival buildings," the two-story building with hip roof and five-bay main facade replaced a . . . — Map (db m57038) HM
North Carolina (Camden County), South Mills — Battle of South MillsFight for the Canal — Burnside Expedition
Early in 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside led an expedition to secure the coast of North Carolina and occupy strategically important sites such as New Bern and Elizabeth City. After Burnside learned of the March 9 clash between USS . . . — Map (db m56761) HM
North Carolina (Camden County), South Mills — A 8 — Battle of South Mills
Confederates, on Apr. 19, 1862, repelled Union army here, prevented demolition of Dismal Swamp Canal locks three miles N.W. — Map (db m57037) HM
North Carolina (Camden County), South Mills — A 12 — Dismal Swamp Canal
Connects Albemarle Sound with Chesapeake Bay. Begun 1790; in use by War of 1812. — Map (db m56763) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Articles of Capitulation
In this place General Cos signed articles capitulating to the Texans who under Milam and Johnson took San Antonio Dec. 9, 1835. — Map (db m82889) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Benito Juarez1806 - 1872
El Presidente Benito Juárez encabezó la Reforma que consolidó el México moderno, defendió la soberanía nacional contra la intervención extranjera e impulsó el desarrollo económico del país. As one of the creators of modern Mexico, President . . . — Map (db m82940) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — S — Bolivar Hall
Construction of Bolivar Hall was begun in 1940 and completed in 1941. The combination library, museum, and community center was dedicated to the promotion of inter-American peace, and was named in honor of South American patriot, Simon Bolivar. . . . — Map (db m82915) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — H — Bombach House and Store
Otto Bombach, a carpenter, built this combination house and store in 1856 before moving to Mexico. His wife lived here and managed the property until it was sold in 1869. Victor Bracht, author of Texas in 1848, lived here briefly, and in . . . — Map (db m82888) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — B — Bowen-Kirchner House
Margarita Pérez de Rodríguez, consort of Compañía de Béxar soldier Jose Antonio Rodríguez, was given this land "in satisfaction of her constitutional allowance." She sold the property in 1851 to San Antonio postmaster John Bowen, who conveyed it to . . . — Map (db m82896) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Commemorating
The 20th anniversary of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) signing ceremony which occurred in this place on October 7, 1992 between the countries of Canada, Mexico, and the United States of America. From left to right (standing) . . . — Map (db m82883) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — G — Gray-Guilbeau House
José Amador was given this property by the Spanish Government in 1817. His heirs sold it to P.L. Buquor in 1847. Later that year, James Gray bought the land and built this house, which he sold to French consul Francois Guilbeau in 1853. Another . . . — Map (db m82893) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — 2333 — Halff House
Mayer Halff (1836-1905) immigrated to Texas from Lauterborg, Alsace Lorraine, France, in 1850. In partnership with his brother Solomon, he opened a mercantile business in Liberty and began a cattle ranching enterprise. They moved to San Antonio in . . . — Map (db m82808) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — N — Herrera House(The San Martin House)
The Curbier Family, which was granted land in La Villita after the 1819 flood, sold this property in 1854 to Rafael Herrera, husband of their daughter Vicenta. Herrera built this house and owned it until 1897. The property, which extended back to . . . — Map (db m82900) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — P — Hessler House(The Canada House)
Juana Francisca Montes de Flores inherited this property from her husband, Jose Leonardo de la Garza, and sold it to Ernest Hessler in 1869. Hessler built this house before 1873, when it appears on the city map. He never lived here, and in 1891 sold . . . — Map (db m82912) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Q — Hessler House(The Guadalupe House)
Like 208 South Presa, which it resembles, this house was probably built shortly after 1869 on land purchased by Ernest Hessler from Juana Francisca Montes de Flores. The structure, which appears on the 1873 city map, was rented when Louis Foutrel . . . — Map (db m82913) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — 4962 — John W. Smith(November 4, 1792 - January 12, 1845)
Great early San Antonio leader, a native of North Carolina. Moved to Illinois, then to Missouri, where he was sheriff of Rawls County in 1824. Came to Texas with Green DeWitt in 1826 and settled at Gonzales. Smith moved to San Antonio in 1828 . . . — Map (db m82880) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — L — Kitchen
As early as 1877, this land was the site of an adobe residence where Mrs. Kate Womble operated a boarding house popular among travelers to San Antonio. The house appeared on the 1873 city map. The Sanborn Insurance maps show it as late as 1904. The . . . — Map (db m82910) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — La Villita
La Villita, “The Little Village”, settled about 1722 as “The Town of the Alamo". Here General Martin de Perfecto Cos signed the Articles of Capitulation to Texians December 11, 1835 and General Santa Anna's artillery battery . . . — Map (db m82886) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — C — Losana House
Mariano Romano Losana bought this land in 1859, and probably built this house soon afterward. It was purchased by Rafael Lopez in l866 and sold again in 1871, when the deed referred to “the house, out houses, fences and all other . . . — Map (db m82894) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Naming of San Antonio
This marker commemorates the 275th anniversary of the naming of the site that became the city of San Antonio. On the feast of St. Anthony of Padua, June 13, 1691, Padre Damian Massanet, Franciscan missionary and Governor Don Domingo Teran, . . . — Map (db m82890) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — 5079 — Original Site of St. Philip's College
Opening at this site in 1898 as "St. Philip's Saturday evening sewing class for black girls", this college was found by the Rt. Rev. James Steptoe Johnston (1843-1924), Episcopal Bishop of western Texas, who considered education a tool toward . . . — Map (db m82879) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — K — St. Philip's College
St. Philip‘s College was begun in an adobe house just north of this building in 1898. Originally a parochial day school, it grew into a grammar and industrial school with a boarding department. This two-story brick building was constructed by the . . . — Map (db m82898) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — O — Tejada House(The Caxias House)
This house appears on the 1873 city map and was probably built by José and Refugia Durán Tejada, who bought the land in 1855 from Concepción Ruiz. Ernest Hessler, who already owned the two houses to the west on Presa Street, bought the property in . . . — Map (db m82911) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — F — The Dashiell House(Casa Villita)
Colonel Jeremiah Y. Dashiell, a physician who served as paymaster in the U.S.-Mexico War, bought this land on the San Antonio River in 1849. Dashiell was stationed in South Carolina in 1856, when he sent his wife and daughter money and instructions . . . — Map (db m82892) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — The German-English School Buildings
Erected as a school for children of German settlers, these historic buildings have served numerous educational and cultural purposes: 1858 – German–English school founded by "The Lateiner”, a group of German intellectuals. . . . — Map (db m82882) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — R — The Weaving Building And Kiln
This property was the site of a small caliche house that stood at 105 Nacional Street. Because of its poor condition, the house was demolished during the restoration of La Villita in 1939. The property had been owned by José Maria Monjaras and . . . — Map (db m82914) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Elijah BakerPioneer Baptist of the Eastern Shore of Virginia
who landed at Hunt's Point, Old Plantation Creek, on Easter Sunday 1776 and the same day preached the first Baptist sermon, “At the End of a Horsing Tree.” Opposition of the established church caused him to be deported; but kind . . . — Map (db m71852) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Belle Haven — WY 13 — Occohannock Indians
The Occohannock Indians, one of the important Virginia Indian groups on the Eastern Shore, were composed of several tribes including the Onancock, Machipongo, Metomkin, Chincoteague, Kegotank, Pungoteague, Chesconessex, and Nandua. Capt. John Smith . . . — Map (db m71855) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 165 — Advance Mills
Villages such as Advance Mills were once common features of rural Virginia, serving as economic and social centers. Advance Mills grew around a single mill that John Fray constructed in 1833 on the north fork of the Rivanna River. By the twentieth . . . — Map (db m55785) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 166 — Convention Army The Barracks
In Jan. 1779, during the American Revolution, 4,000 British troops and German mercenaries (commonly known as “Hessians”) captured following the Battle of Saratoga in New York arrived here after marching from Massachusetts. It was called . . . — Map (db m55784) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Clifton Forge — L 5 — Lucy Selina Furnace
This furnace was built in 1827 by ironmasters John Jordan and John Irvine and was named for their wives. During the Civil War, iron produced here was used in the manufacture of Confederate Munitions. — Map (db m46386) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — Humpback Bridge
Humpback Bridge constructed of hand hewn timbers in 1835 for the James River Kanawha Turnpike Corporation remained in public use until 1929. In 1953, through the efforts of the Covington Business and Professional Women's Club, the Chamber of . . . — Map (db m46388) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — L 4 — Oakland Grove Presbyterian Church
First called the Church by the Spring, Oakland Grove Church may have been organized as early as 1834, but it was officially established circa 1847 as a mission of Covington Presbyterian Church. A simple brick house of worship constructed during a . . . — Map (db m46377) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — Oakland Presbyterian ChurchOrganized 1834
In continuous use as a place of worship except for a period between 1861 and 1865 when it was used as a hospital for a contingent of General T.J. (Stonewall) Jackson's troops encamped nearby. A monument in the churchyard marks the graves of . . . — Map (db m46379) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — Oakland Presbyterian Church and CemeteryA Brief History
William Henry Haynes, Sr. donated land for the Oakland Church and cemetery in 1811 to trustees James M. Montague, John P. Haynes, David Williamson and William H. Haynes, Jr. But the deed was not recorded until 1859. The original structure is said to . . . — Map (db m46378) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — Oakland Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
Jackson River Station Around 1857, the Virginia Central Railroad completed the Jackson River Depot and was the terminus of the railroad for trains and travelers heading west. Travelers had to continue their travels by horseback or . . . — Map (db m46385) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Covington — Z 286 — West Virginia / Alleghany County, Virginia
(obverse) West Virginia West Virginia was long a part of Virginia. Morgan Morgan began the settlement of the region in 1727. A great battle with the Indians took place at Point Pleasant in 1774. West Virginia became a separate . . . — Map (db m46376) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — Amelia Court HouseLee's Retreat — April 4-5, 1865
General Lee ordered all columns of his army from the Richmond and Petersburg trenches to rendezvous at this village on the Richmond & Danville Railroad. Here he hoped to obtain rations before continuing the march to North Carolina to join General . . . — Map (db m18871) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — John Banister Tabb
Patriot Father John Bannister Tabb was born in Amelia County in 1845 at “The Forest”, the Tabb family plantation. A member of one of wealthiest families in Virginia, he was carefully schooled by private tutors until the age of . . . — Map (db m35959) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — Lamkin’s Battery
This mortar belonged to the battery cammanded by Captain J.N. Lamkin. On July 30, 1864, at the “Crater”, the battery helped check the Union advance until Mahone came up. Four mortars were captured near Flat Creek in Lee’s Retreat, April . . . — Map (db m18873) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 11 — Lee's Retreat
Lee's army, retreating toward Danville, reached this place, April 4-5, 1865, only to find that the supplies ordered here had gone on to Richmond. The famished soldiers were forced to halt to forage. The result was that Lee, when he resumed the march . . . — Map (db m18874) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 28 — Marion Harland(12 Dec. 1830-3 June, 1922)
Born Mary Virginia Hawes at Dennisville about eight miles south, Harland was a prolific author, producing a syndicated newspaper column for women, many short stories, 25 novels, 25 volumes on domestic life, and 12 books on travel, biography, and . . . — Map (db m19029) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — 10 — Mrs. Samantha Jane NeilAmelia Court House, Virginia — Amelia County
Amelia County is largely indebted to one woman for bringing formal education and religion to African Americans after the Civil War. In 1865 Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil left her home in Pennsylvania to search for her husband’s body. He had been a . . . — Map (db m20239) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — 9 — Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and SchoolAmelia Court House, Virginia — Amelia County
Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and the Russell Grove School were established as a result of the efforts of Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil, a Presbyterian missionary and teacher of African-American children after the Civil War. At first the school . . . — Map (db m28927) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 31 — William Branch Giles
Noted lawyer and statesman William Branch Giles was born 12 Aug. 1762 in Amelia County and educated at Hampden-Sydney College, Princeton, and the College of William and Mary. Giles served Virginia in the United States House of Representatives . . . — Map (db m19039) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 7 — Amelia SpringsLee's Retreat — April 6, 1865
A portion of the Union army encountered Lee’s rearguard as the Southerners completed their night march around Grant's troops. This was also the scene of an April 5 engagement as Union cavalry returned from destroying a Confederate wagon train at . . . — Map (db m28833) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Amelia SpringsTwo Days of Action — Lee's Retreat
Union cavalry under Gen. Henry E. Davies, Jr. left Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s column near Jetersville on April 5, 1865, on a reconnaissance mission against the Army of Northern Virginia. Davies swept by here, rode through Paineville, and four Miles . . . — Map (db m28834) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 8 — DeatonvilleLee's Retreat — April 6, 1865
During this day, the entire Confederate line would march west on the Rice-Deatonville Road toward Farmville. Constantly pressing Lee's rearguard, Union troops would fight a brief action at every turn. These delays would eventually lead to the Battle . . . — Map (db m28836) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 6 — JetersvilleLee's Retreat — April 5, 1865
Lee found Union cavalry and infantry across his line of retreat at this station on the Richmond and Danville Railroad. Rather than attacking the entrenched Federals, he chose to change direction and begin a night march toward Farmville where rations . . . — Map (db m18886) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Z 48 — Nottoway County / Amelia County
(Obverse) Nottoway County Area 310 Square Miles Formed in 1788 from Amelia, and named for an Indian tribe. Tarleton passed through this county in 1781. Here lived William Hodges Mann, Governor of Virginia 1910-14. . . . — Map (db m18925) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Assaulting the Confederate Battle Line — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
"The men pressed forward, holding their fire with wonderful self control till they were in plain site of the enemy almost face to face." As the Federal troops realigned themselves after the creek crossing, and because of the shorter . . . — Map (db m54473) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Crossing Little Sailor's CreekThe Federal Army's Attack, 6:00 p.m. April 6, 1865 — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
"We found a stream of muddy water a dozen feet wide..." “The colonel’s clear voice sounded ‘ATTENTION’....Descending the hill; ‘Prepare to cross a marsh!’ was passed along the line....Three or four minutes later we found ourselves . . . — Map (db m54474) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — The Final Clash: With Fate Against Them — Sailor's Creek Battlefield State Park
"There goes a chivalrous fellow. Let's give him three cheers." Near this site were positioned Confederate forces commanded by General Joseph B. Kershaw. They were mainly from Mississippi and Georgia and were slightly dug in behind . . . — Map (db m54471) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Victory or DeathThe Last Stand of the Savannah Volunteer Guard — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
The 18th Georgia Battalion, acting as a heavy artillery unit was originally formed in 1802 and served at the coastal defenses around Charleston, South Carolina. Moved to Virginia in May of 1864, it guarded the Richmond & Danville Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m54475) HM
Virginia (Amherst County), Amherst — Amherst County Confederate Soldiers Monument
Confederate Soldiers 1861 - 1865 To the memory of The Sons of Amherst County who from 1861 to 1865 upheld in arms the cause of Virginia and the South, who fell in battle or died from wounds, and survivors of the war who as . . . — Map (db m67324) WM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Confederate Artillery PositionBattle of Appomattox Station
Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Norther Virginia began the retreat west from Richmond and Petersburg on April 3, 1865, with about 250 cannon. Two days later, at Amelia Court House, about a hundred of the least effective pieces were culled . . . — Map (db m84749) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Custer's Third BrigadeBattle of Appomattox Station
Union Col. Henry Capehart commanded Gen. George A. Custer’s Third Cavalry Brigade on Custer’s left flank. On April 8, 1865, Capehart had only the 1st New York (Lincoln) an 1st and 2nd West Virginia regiments on hand, the 3rd West Virginia had . . . — Map (db m84751) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K 157 — Surrender at Appomattox
At the McLean house at Appomattox, two miles north, took place the meeting between Lee and Grant to arrange terms for the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. This was at 1:30 P.M. on Sunday, April 9, 1865. — Map (db m34478) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K 156 — The Last Fight
Two miles north, at sunrise of April 9, 1865, Fitz Lee and Gordon, moving westward, attacked Sheridan's position. The attack was repulsed, but a part of the Confederate cavalry under Munford and Rosser broke through the Union line and escaped. This . . . — Map (db m34477) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Walker's Last StandCuster's Charges
One of the last battles of the Civil War in Virginia took place here early in the evening of April 8, 1865. Confederate Gen. Reuben L. Walker, who commanded 100 guns of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s reserve artillery, made camp here late in the afternoon. . . . — Map (db m84750) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Gordon’s Attack April 9, 1865Appomattox Court House National Historical Park
Prior to midnight on April 8, 1865, with Federal troops closing in on three sides and the line of retreat along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road blocked, General R. E. Lee held a Council of War with his ranking generals to discuss . . . — Map (db m84563) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — North Carolina
At this place was fought the last skirmish by Captain Wilson T. Jenkins of the 14th North Carolina Regiment commanding 25 men of the 4th and 14th N.C. Regiments. — Map (db m84748) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Tibbs Lane
Confederate Infantry deployed along this road on the morning of April 9, 1865 prior to the Battle of Appomattox Court House. The battle fought near here would be the last for the Army of Northern Virginia. — Map (db m84564) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Concord — Z 58 — Appomattox County / Campbell County
Appomattox County Appomattox County was named for the Appomattox River, which runs through the county. The river is named for the Appamattuck tribe, which lived near the mouth of the river. The county was formed from parts of Buckingham, . . . — Map (db m74018) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Raphine — A 39 — New Providence Church
This church, seven and a half miles west, was organized by John Blair in 1746. Five successive church buildings have been erected. The first pastor was John Brown. Samuel Brown, second pastor, had as wife Mary Moore, captured in youth by Indians and . . . — Map (db m32081) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Staunton — A 53 — Bethel Church
Two miles west. The first church was built by Colonel Robert Doak in 1779. Captain James Tate, an elder, led in the battles of Cowpens and Guilford Courthouse (1781) a company drawn mainly from this church. In the churchyard 23 Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m32104) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Staunton — I-11A — Roanoke College
Five miles west is the birthplace of Virginia Institute, founded in 1842 by David F. Bittle, assisted by Christopher C. Baughman. Chartered on January 30, 1845, as Virginia Collegiate Institute, the school was moved to Salem, Virginia, in 1847, and . . . — Map (db m32079) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Stuarts Draft — JD 15 — John Colter
John Colter, born in Stuart's Draft about 1775, was a member of the northwest expedition led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1804-1806). During his subsequent, solitary explorations of the West, Colter traversed the area now comprising . . . — Map (db m46393) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — AvenelIn the Eye of the Storm — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m42844) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — BedfordHunter’s Raid — 1864 Valley Campaign
On the evening of June 15, 1864, the lead element of Union Gen. David Hunter’s 18,000-man army arrived here and cam near Avenel. The main force arrived the following morning and started destroying the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad tracks, burning . . . — Map (db m41408) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — K 134 — Bedford
This place became the county seat of Bedford when it was moved from New London in 1782. First called Liberty (incorporated in 1839), the town changed its name to Bedford City in 1890 and to Bedford in 1912. A third courthouse, built in 1834, was . . . — Map (db m42879) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — Bedford County Confederate Monument
Deo Vindice To the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors of Bedford County. 1861-1865 Bedford honors her heroes; proudly rejoicing with the living; sincerely mourning the dead. Their history is it's brightest page, exhibiting the . . . — Map (db m43042) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — Bedford County WWII Memorial
June 6 1944 Erected by the Parker-Hoback Post, 29th Division Association, in memory of the Bedford County men of the 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Division, who gave their lives in the preparation for and the participation in the Normandy . . . — Map (db m52054) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — Bedford’s Volunteer Company
Oct. 10, 1774 In memory of Bedford’s Volunteer Company which fought in The Battle of Point Pleasant Thomas Buford, Captain Thomas Dooley, Lieut. Sergeants Jonathan Cundiff, Ensign Nicholas Mead • William Kennedy • John . . . — Map (db m43717) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — K 132 — Home of John Goode
Here is the home of John Goode, political leader, born 1829, died, 1909. Goode was a member of the secession convention of 1861; of the Confederate Congress and of the United States Congress; Solicitor General of the United States; president of the . . . — Map (db m42877) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — K 130 — Hunter's Bivouac
Near here General Hunter, on his retreat from Lynchburg, halted for the night of June 18, 1864. He resumed his retreat early in the morning of June 19. — Map (db m42875) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — Peaks of Otter“A rougher road could not be imagined” — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55780) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — K 136 — Peaks of Otter Road
This road was followed by General Hunter when he crossed the Blue Ridge at the Peaks of Otter and came to Bedford en route to Lynchburg, June 16, 1864. — Map (db m42893) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Bedford — K 133 — Randolph-Macon AcademyLiberty Academy
Randolph-Macon Academy, a Methodist preparatory school for boys, occupied a building on this site from 1890 until 1934 when the school was consolidated with the Randolph-Macon Academy at Front Royal. In 1936, the property was purchased by Bedford . . . — Map (db m42878) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Forest — New London AcademyConfederate Cavalry Line — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55782) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Forest — K 141 — New London Academy
Chartered by the state in 1795, this is the oldest secondary school in Virginia in continuous operation under its own charter. Conducted for many years as a private school for boys, it began to receive public funds in 1884. It now operates as a . . . — Map (db m55789) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Forest — K 140 — St. Stephen's Church
Half a mile north is St. Stephen's Church, built about 1825 under Rev. Nicholas Cobb, later Bishop of Alabama. In the old cemetery here many members of early families of the community are buried. — Map (db m42894) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Montvale — K 121 — Colonial Fort
Near here stood a fortified dwelling used for shelter during periods of warfare between European colonists and Native Americans. To this fort in 1756 came Mary Draper Ingles (Mrs. William Ingles) for protection following her escape from captivity by . . . — Map (db m42851) HM
Virginia (Bedford County), Thaxton — K 160 — 1889 Thaxton Train Wreck
On 2 July 1889, a heavy storm turned nearby Wolf Creek into a raging river. The railroad embankment known as Newman’s Fill, just north of here, became saturated. About 1:25 AM, it collapsed under the weight of Norfolk & Western Passenger Train . . . — Map (db m84781) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Buchanan & The James River & Kanawha CanalCelebrating more than two centuries of history
Buchanan, Virginia is the western terminus of the James River & Kanawha Canal. Considered one of Virginia’s most remarkable engineering feats ever attempted, the Canal’s beginnings stretch back to 1785, when George Washington appeared before the . . . — Map (db m55794) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Buchanan BridgeAn Artillery Duel Ensued — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55777) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — The AnchorageUnexpected Guests — Hunter's Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55779) HM
Virginia (Botetourt County), Buchanan — Wilson Warehouse“Fit only for … owls and bats.” — Hunter’s Raid
(preface) On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of . . . — Map (db m55775) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Alberta — DanieltownA Side Raid: 32 Troopers Captured — Wilson-Kautz Raid
In June 1864, to deny Gen. Robert E. Lee the use of the South Side R.R. and the Richmond and Danville R.R., Gen. Ulysses S Grant sent Gen. James H. Wilson and Gen. August V. Kautz south of Petersburg on a cavalry raid to destroy track and rolling . . . — Map (db m20168) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Alberta — S 66 — Fort Christanna
Nearby to the south stood Fort Christanna, a wooden structure built in 1714 under the auspices of Alexander Spotswood and the Virginia Indian Company. Members of the Meiponsky, Occaneechi, Saponi, Stuckenock, and Tutelo Indian tribes lived within . . . — Map (db m20181) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Alberta — S 65 — Old Brunswick Courthouse
Here the first courthouse of Brunswick County was built about 1732. In 1746, when the county was divided, the county seat was moved east near Thomasburg. In 1783, after Greensville County had been formed, the courthouse was moved to Lawrenceville. — Map (db m20180) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Alberta — 38 — Southside Virginia Community CollegeAlberta, Virginia — Brunswick County
Southside Virginia Community College has two campuses: the Christanna Campus in Alberta, which opened in 1970, and the John H. Daniel campus in Keysville, which opened in 1971. The college is part of the statewide system of community colleges . . . — Map (db m30868) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Alberta — S 60 — Sturgeon Creek
A branch of the Nottoway, named for the huge fish once caught in it. William Byrd, returning from the expedition to survey the Virginia-North Carolina boundary line, camped on this stream in November, 1729. — Map (db m62406) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — Bridges of Brunswick County
While wooden trestle bridges were numerous in Brunswick County, the Meherrin River Bridge was one of a few truss bridges on the A&D between Pinners Point (at Portsmouth) and Danville. Built in 1893, the 150-feet long, through truss pin-connected . . . — Map (db m94363) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — Broadnax
A community of mills, warehouses, homes and stores sprang up with the construction of the Atlantic and Danville Railway in the 1890s. A combination freight and passenger station was located at Brodnax shown here in 1948. Bales of cotton, timber and . . . — Map (db m94357) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — Rolling Post Office
Until about 1967, the U.S. Postal Service used the railroads to handle mail on designated routes. The mail was handled in special railroad cars usually moved on passenger trains, designated as Railway Post Office (RPO) cars. The RPOs were actually . . . — Map (db m94359) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — The American Thoroughbred in Brunswick
The Thoroughbred is a horse breed synonymous with racing. All modem Thoroughbreds trace back to three stallions imported into England from the Middle East in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. English Thoroughbreds were imported into North . . . — Map (db m94361) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — Tobacco As a Way of Life
Tobacco has long held a sacred and prominent role among the Indian tribes in the southeast. Well before Christopher Columbus returned with tobacco seeds from the Caribbean or Sir Walter Raleigh made smoking fashionable in Europe when he returned . . . — Map (db m94362) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Broadnax — You are Traveling Through the Scenic Meherrin River Watershed!
Did you know… A raindrop falling in the Meherrin River Watershed will travel over 200 miles before reaching the Atlantic?! Watersheds are the collective web of tributaries and surrounding land draining to a common waterbody, such as a major . . . — Map (db m94364) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Brodnax — S 67 — Brunswick County, Virginia"The Original Home of Brunswick Stew"
According to local tradition, while Dr. Creed Haskins and several friends were on a hunting trip in Brunswick County in 1828, his camp cook, Jimmy Matthews, hunted squirrels for a stew. Matthews simmered the squirrels with butter, onions, stale . . . — Map (db m20188) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Brodnax — 40 — Hospital and School of the Good ShepherdLawrenceville, Virginia — Brunswick County
Though many freed African Americans continued after the Civil War to work the same farms on which they had been slaves, many also left their homes in search of better opportunities elsewhere. Often the sick, elderly and very young were left . . . — Map (db m30873) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Brodnax — Z 38 — Mecklenburg County / Brunswick County
(Obverse) Mecklenburg County Formed in 1764 from Lunenburg, and named for Princess Charlotte, of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen of George III. A small army under the command of rebel Nathaniel Bacon destroyed the town of the Occaneechee . . . — Map (db m30875) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Brodnax — S 74 — Staunton River Raid
The Union General Wilson, returning to Grant's army from a raid to Staunton River, crossed the road near here, June, 1864. — Map (db m20163) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Dolphin — SN 61 — Smoky Ordinary
The ordinary that stood on this site catered to travelers on the north-south stage road as early as 1750. During the American Revolution local warehouses were burned by British Colonel Tarleton, and legend says that it was from that occurrence that . . . — Map (db m20164) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Dolphin — Smoky Ordinary“Rebel cavalry” — Wilson-Kautz Raid
In June 1864, to deny Gen. Robert E. Lee the use of the South Side R.R. and the Richmond and Danville R.R., Gen. Ulysses S. Grant sent Gen. James H. Wilson and Gen. August V. Kautz south of Petersburg on a cavalry raid to destroy track and rolling . . . — Map (db m20171) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Brunswick County Confederate Monument
In memory of the Confederate Heroes of Brunswick County 1861.-1865. Love makes memory eternal Virginia — Map (db m20217) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Brunswick County Courthouse
Late in the afternoon of May 15, 1864, Union Gen. August V. Kautz and his cavalry division rode into Lawrenceville, the Brunswick County seat. They were on the second leg of a two-part, two-week-long expedition to destroy railroad bridges and depots . . . — Map (db m62400) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Col. John Jonesof Brunswick County
Soldier of the Revolution Feb. 14, 1735 – Jan. 11, 1793 Vestryman St. Andrew’s Parish 1775-79 Justice 1760-93 Sheriff 1773-75 Clerk 1789-93 House of Burgesses 1772-73 Virginia Senate 1776-89 Speaker of the Senate . . . — Map (db m20216) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — U 90 — Fort Christanna
Nearby to the south stood Fort Christanna, a wooden structure built in 1714 under the auspices of Alexander Spotswood and the Virginia Indian Company. Members of the Meiponsky, Occaneechi, Saponi, Stuckenock, and Tutelo Indian tribes lived within . . . — Map (db m20184) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — 41 — Fort ChristannaLawrenceville, Virginia — Brunswick County
In 1714, at Governor Alexander Spotswood’s urging, the Virginia General Assembly funded the Virginia Indian Company, charged with building a fort on the banks of the Meherrin River in what would become Brunswick County. The fort would provide . . . — Map (db m20197) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Fort Christanna: Established 1714“The Farthest Western Outpost of the British Empire”
A Fort Called Christ-Anna You are standing at the site of Fort Christanna, a colonial fort laid out in 1714 by Virginia’s Governor Alexander Spotswood. The fort was built on a tract of land set aside in 1714 for a trading post, as well as a . . . — Map (db m20199) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Governor Alexander Spotswood
Alexander Spotswood (1676-1740) was Governor of Virginia from 1710 to 1722. Born in Africa of a Scottish family, he had distinguished himself at the Battle of Bleinheim and was wounded. He was appointed to the governor’s position in Virginia in . . . — Map (db m20200) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Native Americans and Fort Christanna
The story of Native Americans after Jamestown's founding in 1607 is a tragic one. At that time the Siouan Indians of Virginia probably numbered 6,300 people. By 1714, when Fort Christanna was established, they were in difficult circumstances, being . . . — Map (db m20198) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — SN 63 — Saint Paul's College
Saint Paul's College was established in 1883 by the Venerable James Solomon Russell (1857-1935) as an Episcopal mission school to serve the black community of Southside Virginia. Born into slavery in Mecklenburg County, Russell was educated at . . . — Map (db m20187) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — 39 — Saint Paul's CollegeLawrenceville, Virginia — Brunswick County
Saint Paul’s College began as a small parochial school founded by a newly ordained Episcopal deacon, the Rev. James Solomon Russell. Born into slavery, Russell attended seminary school in Petersburg. Within a year of graduation he had managed . . . — Map (db m30870) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — Site of Fort Christanna
. . . — Map (db m20190) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Lawrenceville — The Colonial Dames of America Monument
In 1924 the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the Commonwealth of Virginia acquired three and three-quarters acres of land on which the fort was presumed to have been built, then erected a monument of concrete embedded with . . . — Map (db m20202) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Valentines — S 84 — Brunswick Circuit
The Brunswick Circuit, established in 1773 by Robert Williams, is likely the oldest Methodist circuit in America. It extended from Petersburg south into North Carolina, and became known as “the cradle of Methodism in the South.” By 1776, . . . — Map (db m60671) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Valentines — SN 58 — Brunswick County, Virginia"The Original Home of Brunswick Stew"
According to local tradition, while Dr. Creed Haskins and several friends were on a hunting trip in Brunswick County in 1828, his camp cook, Jimmy Matthews, hunted squirrels for a stew. Matthews simmered the squirrels with butter, onions, stale . . . — Map (db m60672) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Valentines — SN 60 — Mason's Chapel
Near here stood Mason's Chapel, one of the earliest Methodist churches in southern Virginia. The first Virginia conference, May, 1785, was held here or nearby; Bishop Asbury presided. The conference of 1801 was held here. The present Olive Branch . . . — Map (db m60673) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Warfield — S 57 — Birch's Bridge
At Birch's Bridge (very near this bridge) the second William Byrd and his party crossed the river, in September, 1733, on their way to inspect Byrd's land holdings in North Carolina. Byrd wrote an account of this trip which he called “A . . . — Map (db m62403) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Warfield — S 68 — Brunswick County, Virginia"The Original Home of Brunswick Stew"
According to local tradition, while Dr. Creed Haskins and several friends were on a hunting trip in Brunswick County in 1828, his camp cook, Jimmy Matthews, hunted squirrels for a stew. Matthews simmered the squirrels with butter, onions, stale . . . — Map (db m20186) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Warfield — Z 37 — Dinwiddie County / Brunswick County
(obverse) Dinwiddie County Area 521 Square Miles Formed in 1752 from Prince George, and named for Robert Dinwiddie, Governor of Virginia 1751-1756. General Winfield Scott was born in this county, and in it took place the battle . . . — Map (db m62404) HM
Virginia (Brunswick County), Warfield — S 58 — Ebenezer Academy
A few hundred yards east is the site of Ebenezer Academy, founded in 1793 by Bishop Asbury, the first Methodist school established in Virginia. It passed out of the hands of the church but remained a noted school for many years. — Map (db m62405) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — O 42 — After Appomattox
Just to the south a monument marks the spot where the tent of Robert E. Lee stood the night of April 12-13, 1865. — Map (db m21104) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Buckingham County War Memorial
In memory of all those of Buckingham County who died in the military service of our Country and in honor of all those who served. Emplaced by the people of Buckingham County through the Buckingham County Ruritan Club. May 28, 1990. World War . . . — Map (db m67328) WM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Buckingham CourthouseHistoric District
Designed by Thomas Jefferson in 1821, burned in 1869, rebuilt in 1873. The exterior follows Jefferson’s plan with the interior redesigned. Copy of original plan and specifications on display in courthouse. Registered in 1969 as a National and . . . — Map (db m21108) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Confederate Soldiers of Buckingham County
. . . — Map (db m21110) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — O 39 — Geographical Center of Virginia
About two miles south and one-half mile west is the geographical center of the state. Latitude: 37° 30.6' north Longitude: 78° 37.5' west — Map (db m21133) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — 4 — One-Room SchoolhouseBuckingham, Virginia — Buckingham County
Union Grove School is representative of the many one-room schools for African-American students in Buckingham County and throughout the area. The African-American members of the community built Union Grove around 1925, and like most schools, it . . . — Map (db m21148) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Thomas Jefferson’s Lost CourthouseA Research Project of the Longwood Archaeology Field School
“Buckingham County, 26th February, 1869 A Editor’s dispatch: sad calamity has befallen our country. The court-house was set fire yesterday morning at about 1 o’clock, and by daylight was a mass of ruins.” Source: Richmond . . . — Map (db m67320) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Thomas Jefferson’s Lost CourthouseA Research Project of the Longwood Archaeology Field School
“I have taken the liberty to trespass upon your time and talents (a common stock) which we all seem to have a right to draw upon, …to draft for us a plan of our Court house,…” Source: Letter from Colonel Charles Yancey to . . . — Map (db m67321) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Buckingham — Thomas Jefferson’s Lost CourthouseA Research Project of the Longwood Archaeology Field School
“When buildings are of durable materials, every new edifice is an actual and permanent acquisition to the state, adding to its value as well as to its ornament…” Source: Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia 8 The . . . — Map (db m67322) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Cumberland — Z 142 — Buckingham County / Cumberland County
(Obverse) Buckingham County Area 584 square miles Formed in 1761 from Albemarle, and named for Buckinghamshire, England. Peter Francisco, noted Revolutionary soldier, lived in this county. (Reverse) Cumberland County . . . — Map (db m21134) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Cumberland — O 99 — Robert Bolling(1738-1775)
Robert Bolling, member of the House of Burgesses, lived near here at his home Chellowe. A prolific writer, he published many poems as well as a treatise on wine-making. In 1766, Bolling precipitated a crisis when in an article in the Williamsburg . . . — Map (db m74003) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Dillwyn — F 54 — Female Collegiate Institute
Two miles east is the site of the first college for women in Virginia, the Female Collegiate Institute. Opened in 1837, it failed in 1843. Reopened in 1848, it survived until 1863. The school building has been destroyed but the "President's Cottage" . . . — Map (db m21128) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), New Canton — 5 — Carter G. Woodson BirthplaceNew Canton, Virginia — Buckingham County
North of this sign is the birthplace of Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Dr. Woodson was born December 19, 1875, to former slaves, James Henry and Eliza Ann Riddle Woodson. Young carter left Buckingham to work in West Virginia when he was 17 years old. He . . . — Map (db m31608) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), New Canton — F 56 — Old Buckingham Church
The original or southwest wing was erected about 1758 as a church for the newly-formed Tillotson Parish. It was abandoned following the Disestablishment of the Anglican Church in Virginia in 1784, and thereafter was acquired by the Buckingham . . . — Map (db m21131) HM

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