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Carolina Road Marker Pull-Off Area image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, February 16, 2006
Carolina Road Marker Pull-Off Area
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Pelham
Front: Maj. John Pelham born in Alexandria, Alabama killed at the battle of Kelly's Ford March 17, 1863 Front base: Pelham North side: Erected by the General John H. Forney Chapter U.D.C. Jacksonville, . . . — Map (db m23588) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — Discover DC / Judiciary Square
Welcome to downtown Washington DC—an area rich in history, culture and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. The Courts on Judiciary Square. Judiciary Square is one of the . . . — Map (db m18439) HM
Florida (Orange County), Orlando — F-483 — Site of Fort Gatlin
On November 9, 1838, during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-42), the U.S. Army established Fort Gatlin in Mosquito County. This fort was named for Army Assistant Surgeon John S. Gatlin (1806-1835), who was killed in the Dade Massacre in 1835. . . . — Map (db m6912) HM
Florida (Osceola County), Yeehaw Junction — F-369 — The Desert Inn
The Desert Inn was founded as a trading post in the late 1880s. The present building dates before 1925 and served as a supply and recreational center for cattle drovers, lumber men and tourists during the era when much of Osceola County was still . . . — Map (db m3256) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Atlanta — 060-71 — Hardee’s Attack
July 20, 1864. At 3:30 P.M., 3 divisions of Hardee’s A.C., [CS] Bate’s, Walker’s, & Maney’s, moved to the attack of Newton’s 4th A.C. div. [US] posted on the ridge 200 yards north of Collier Road. Bate, on the right of the corps, was just west of . . . — Map (db m16506) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Atlanta — 060-62 — Montgomery's Ferry
James McC. Montgomery acquired 1000 acres in this vicinity about 1821. Owning land on both sides of the river, he had a private ferry until granted a State franchise, Dec. 25, 1837, signed by his friend, Gov. Geo. Gilmer. It was located where the . . . — Map (db m22092) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Cordova — St. Joseph’s Church
Originally a mission of Old Bohemia founded March 18, 1765, by Father Joseph Mosley, S.J. Oldest section built 1782, additions made 1848 and 1903. Father Mosley is one of three priests interred under Chapel. Since 1868, except during wars, . . . — Map (db m3157) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Stevensville — Christ ChurchTown of Broad Creek
First Christian congregation in Maryland organized 1632 by the Reverend Richard James at Kent Fort, south end of island. Church moved here ca. 1650. Rebuilt 1712 and 1826. This oldest continuous congregation in Maryland moved to Stevensville in 1880. — Map (db m3138) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Oxford — Oxford
One of the first towns and ports authorized by Assembly in 1683. Called “William-Stade” in 1695. Robert Morris, father of the financier of the Revolution lived here until his death in 1750. He is buried at Old Whitmarsh Church. — Map (db m3171) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Oxford — Oxford - Bellevue FerryNovember 1683
Believed to be nation’s oldest privately operated ferry service. Ferry has plied across Tred Avon River since Talbot County Court “pitcht upon Mr. Richard Royston to Keepe a Ferry” November 20, 1683, service has been continuous since . . . — Map (db m3170) HM
Montana (Powell County), Ovando — The Bob Marshall Wilderness Country
North of here lies the second largest wilderness in the lower 48 states. Made up of the Bob Marshall, Scapegoat and Great Bear wilderness areas, its north end abuts Glacier National Park, creating a continuous corridor of unspoiled mountains and . . . — Map (db m23926) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Confederate Women's Home
Built in 1915 for the widows and daughters of state's Confederate veterans. Closed, 1981. Cemetery 300 yds. W. — Map (db m30822) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-13 — MacPherson Church
Presbyterian. Founded by early Scottish settlers. Graves of Alexander MacPherson and T. H. Holmes, a Confederate general, 1 1/2 miles N. — Map (db m30814) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G-63 — Duke Homestead
Birthplace of J. B. and B. N. Duke, tobacco and hydroelectric magnates, philanthropists (Duke University, the Duke Endowment), is 1 mi. S.W. — Map (db m30683) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-33 — Buffalo Church
Presbyterian, organized about 1756. Present building, the third, was erected in 1827. Revolutionary soldiers buried here. — Map (db m30836) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-96 — Cone Brothers
Moses and Ceasar Cone pioneered marketing of textiles; manufactured denim & flannel. Their first mill, Proximity, 1895, was 1/4 mile N.E. — Map (db m31027) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-22 — Confederate Cabinet
Members of the cabinet, fleeing south, occupied a railroad car near this spot, Apr. 11-15, 1865. — Map (db m31033) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-111 — David Schenck1835-1902
Founder, Guilford Battle Ground Company, 1887. Led effort to preserve battlefield. His grave is 200 yds. northwest. — Map (db m30992) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-34 — Edgeworth Female Seminary
Established by John M. Morehead, operated, 1840-1862, 1868-1871. Building, burned in 1872, stood at this site. — Map (db m30958) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-92 — Edward R. Murrow1908-1965
Radio correspondent in London during World War Two. Television interviewer & commentator. Born one mile east. — Map (db m30834) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-11 — Greensboro College
First college chartered for women in N.C., 1838. Founded by Methodist Church. Coeducational since 1954. — Map (db m30893) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-109 — Greensboro Law School
Est. by Robert P. Dick & John H. Dillard in 1878. About 300 graduates licensed. School, which was here, closed 1893. — Map (db m30918) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-73 — Greensboro O.R.D.
World War II training camp and overseas replacement depot, 1943-1946. Over 330,000 servicemen were processed here. This is center of 652 acre site. — Map (db m31088) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 89 — Guilford County Health Department
Established in 1911, it was the first county health department in N.C. and second in U.S. Now two blocks north. — Map (db m31000) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-3 — Guilford Courthouse
Important battle of the Revolution between armies of Greene and Cornwallis. U.S. military park. — Map (db m30803) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-74 — Immanuel College
Lutheran. Founded 1903, and moved here in 1905; prepared black students for work in theology & education. Closed 1961. — Map (db m31086) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-21 — Jefferson Davis
The President of the Confederacy held two meetings of his cabinet, April 12-13, 1865, at the home of J. T. Wood, which was a few yards N. — Map (db m31078) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-4 — John Motley Morehead1796-1866
Governor, 1841-45. An advocate for railroads & industrial development. Lived at Blandwood. — Map (db m31005) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-27 — Joseph G. Cannon
Member of Congress for 46 years from Illinois, Speaker of the House, 1903-11. His birthplace stood 1 1/2 miles southwest. — Map (db m30855) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-77 — Lindley Field
First air mail flight through N.C. landed here May 1, 1928. Charles Lindbergh, on Oct. 14, 1927, landed nearby to open field. — Map (db m30835) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-112 — Lunsford Richardson1854-1919
A pharmacist and entrepreneur, he created Vicks VapoRub in 1894 while operating a drugstore 150 yards north. — Map (db m30938) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-85 — Piedmont Railroad
Railroad line between Greensboro and Danville. Constructed, 1862-1864, for the Confederacy. Its terminus was nearby. — Map (db m31071) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-79 — Sit-Ins
Launched the national drive for integrated lunch counters, Feb. 1, 1960, in Woolworth store 2 blocks south. — Map (db m30921) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-64 — T. Gilbert Pearson1873-1943
Ornithologist; teacher; internationally honored conservationist. Founded Audubon Society in N.C. Grave is 1/10 mi. N.E. — Map (db m30996) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-10 — University of N.C. at Greensboro
Est. in 1891 as a normal school; became Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1932. Coeducational since 1963. — Map (db m30891) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Weitzel's Mill
Site of a skirmish between American forces under Col. O. H. Williams and British troops under Col. James Webster, Mar. 6, 1781, is 6 mi. E. — Map (db m30796) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-108 — William McBryar1861-1941
Buffalo Soldier & officer. In 1890 awarded Medal of Honor. His long career exemplified struggles of black soldiers of the era. House stood here. — Map (db m31080) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-49 — Claude Kitchin1869-1923
Congressman, 1901-23, Democratic majority leader, 1915-19. Opposed war declaration; later supported Wilson's war policies. Home is here. — Map (db m31223) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-47 — Gallberry
Built about 1885. Home of three congressmen, W. H. Kitchin and his sons Wm. W. (governor, 1909-1913) and Claude. — Map (db m31233) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-11 — Ram Albemarle
Noted Confederate ironclad, was built near this spot, 1863-64. Aided in recapture of Plymouth, April, 1864. — Map (db m31210) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-53 — Roanoke River
Early channel of trade, its valley long an area of plantations. Frequent floods until 1952, since controlled by Kerr Dam. Old name was "Moratuck." — Map (db m31181) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-50 — Trinity Church
Episcopal. Established about 1732. This building, the third, was erected in 1854, in part with brick from an older church. — Map (db m31212) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-46 — W. W. Kitchin1866-1924
Governor, 1909-1913; congressman, 1897-1908; & attorney. His grave is 240 yards south. — Map (db m31222) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-48 — Whitmel Hill
Colonel in Revolution. Member of Continental Congress, 1778-1781; of Provincial Congresses; and of state legislature. Grave 125 yds. S.E. — Map (db m31217) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Weldon — E-105 — Benjamin S. Turner1825-1894
U.S. Congressman, 1871-1873, representing Ala.; merchant and farmer in Selma, Ala. Born into slavery one mile south. — Map (db m31111) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Weldon — E-23 — Wilmington and Weldon Railroad
Longest railroad in the world when completed in 1840. Length 161 1/2 mi. Terminus was nearby. — Map (db m31091) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Raeford — I-41 — Edenborough Medical College
Early medical school, chartered 1867, conducted by Dr. Hector McLean. Closed c. 1877. Stood one-half mile south. — Map (db m31248) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Raeford — I-43 — Monroe’s Crossroads
Gen. Kilpatrick's Union cavalry repulsed Gen. Hampton's Confederate cavalry there, March 10, 1865, ten miles north. Now in Fort Bragg area. — Map (db m31246) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Raeford — I-45 — Sherman's March
General Sherman, with a part of his army, on March 9-10, 1865, camped here at Bethel Presbyterian Church (organized before 1800). — Map (db m31255) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Raeford — I-47 — State Sanatorium
Opened in 1908. First state institution in North Carolina for treating tuberculosis. Sponsored by Dr. J. E. Brooks of Greensboro. — Map (db m31252) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Red Springs — I-50 — McPhaul’s Mill
Rendezvous point for local Tories. Near here on Sept. 1, 1781, David Fanning's men routed a Whig force under Thomas Wade. Stood 1.7 mi. W. — Map (db m31257) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Garysburg — E-32 — First Railroad
The first railroad in the State was completed in 1833 from Petersburg, Va., to Blakely, on the Roanoke River, a short distance southeast. — Map (db m31122) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Jackson — E-64 — Boon's Mill
Here on July 28, 1863, a Confederate force repulsed a Union march on the vital Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. Breastworks 50 yds. S.W. — Map (db m31147) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Jackson — E-91 — Henry K. Burgwyn
"Boy" Colonel 26th N.C. Regt. Killed at age 21 at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. Home stood 4 miles south. — Map (db m31154) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Jackson — E-10 — Matt W. Ransom
Confederate General, United States Senator, 1872-95, and Minister to Mexico. Home stands 800 yards south. — Map (db m31129) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Jackson — E-83 — Sir Archie
Foundation sire of American Thoroughbred race horses, including Timoleon, Boston, Lexington, & Man O'War. Died at Mowfield, one mile north, in 1833. — Map (db m31130) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Jackson — E-6 — Thomas Bragg
Attorney-General of Confederacy, Governor of N.C. 1855-59, U.S. Senator. Home stands one block north. — Map (db m31156) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Pleasant Hill — E-13 — Cornwallis
Ending his campaign in North Carolina, he entered Virginia near here in May, 1781, and surrendered at Yorktown on October 17, 1781. — Map (db m31094) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Rich Square — E-54 — Roanoke River
Early channel of trade, its valley long an area of plantations. Frequent floods until 1952, since controlled by Kerr Dam. Old name was "Moratuck." — Map (db m31180) HM
North Carolina (Orange County), Chapel Hill — G-100 — Harriet M. Berry1877-1940
Champion of good roads. Her intensive lobbying led to 1921 law creating modern state highway system. Born 8 mi. N. — Map (db m30706) HM
North Carolina (Orange County), Efland — G-122 — Hart's Mill
Grist mill. Site of key Regulator meeting, 1766, and skirmish in 1781 that boosted the Patriot cause. Stood 1/5 mile N. — Map (db m30772) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Hamlet — K-46 — Hamlet Station
Built in 1900 to serve Seaboard Air Line Railroad. Depot was major stop for passengers on east-west & north-south rail lines. About 2 blocks east. — Map (db m31373) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Hamlet — K-31 — John Coltrane1926-1967
Jazz saxophonist and composer; influential stylist. Work spanned bebop to avant garde. Born one block S.W. — Map (db m31359) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-48 — Alfred Dockery1797-1875
U.S. Congressman; state legislator for 10 years. A founder of the state Republican party, 1867. Home is 6 mi. northwest. — Map (db m31412) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-50 — Cameron Morrison1869-1953
Governor, 1921-1925; State legislator; U.S. Senator & Congressman; mayor of Rockingham. Birthplace was 6 mi. S. — Map (db m31437) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-42 — Cartledge Creek Baptist Church
Originally Dockery's Meeting House, about 1774. Baptist State Convention, 1833, voted here to found Wake Forest Institute. About 4 miles North — Map (db m31517) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-28 — Henry William Harrington
Brigadier general of militia, 1776-81, State senator, a commissioner to locate State capital. Grave is five miles S. — Map (db m31383) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-28 — Henry William Harrington
Brigadier general of militia, 1776-81, State senator, a commissioner to locate State capital. Grave is one mile N.W. — Map (db m31513) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-58 — Pee Dee Meeting
Quaker meeting organized, 1755. Westward migration led to decline by the 1840s. Cemetery located 1 1/2 mi. west. — Map (db m31511) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-12 — Sherman's March
Kilpatrick's Cavalry, a part of Sherman's Army, marching from Savannah to Goldsboro, passed through Rockingham on March 7-8, 1865. — Map (db m31515) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Maxton — I-20 — Angus W. McLean1870-1935
Governor, 1925-1929, assistant secretary, U.S. Treasury, 1920-1921. His birthplace was 4 mi. N. — Map (db m31314) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Maxton — I-27 — Carolina College
Operated by Methodist Church, 1911-1926. Site used by Presbyterian Jr. College, 1929-1960; Carolina Military Academy, 1962-1972. One block S. — Map (db m31327) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Maxton — I-25 — Floral College
One of earliest colleges for women in the South, 1841-78. Centre Presbyterian Church, formerly the college chapel, is 150 yards north. — Map (db m31305) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Red Springs — I-24 — Flora MacDonald College
Presbyterian. Founded in 1896. Closed 1961. Merged to create St. Andrews College. Was located 1 mi. east. — Map (db m31286) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Red Springs — I-51 — Raft Swamp
After the Tory victory at McPhaul's Mill, the Whigs routed the Tories near here on Oct. 15, 1781, and broke their resistance in this area. — Map (db m31294) HM
North Carolina (Scotland County), Laurel Hill — I-16 — Sherman's March
As Sherman's army moved north from Georgia, several units passed through Laurel Hill and camped in this vicinity, March 8-9, 1865. — Map (db m31336) HM
North Carolina (Vance County), Henderson — G-121 — Corbitt Company
Built buggies, 1899; by 1907, automobiles; later tractors, buses, and, during WWII, trucks for military. Shop 3/4 mi. S.E. closed 1952. — Map (db m30681) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Fairfield — John Hanson "Hance" Steelman(1655-1749)
Indian trader and interpreter of Maryland and Pennsylvania. First settler in this valley. Born of Swedish parents along the Delaware. This tablet erected by Liberty Twp. and Fairfield Area Bicentennial Cmte. First Marker Placed in 1924 by . . . — Map (db m29543) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bernville — Northkill Amish
The first organized Amish Mennonite congregation in America. Established by 1740. Disbanded following Indian attack, September 29, 1757, in which a Provincial soldier and three members of the Jacob Hochstetler family were killed near this point. — Map (db m29987) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bethel — Fort Henry
Built 1756; garrisoned during the French and Indian War by troops under Capt. Christian Busse. Pennsylvania's major frontier defense east of Ft. Augusta (Sunbury). The site is 3/4 mile to the northwest. — Map (db m29547) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bethel — Fort Henry
1756 FORT HENRY 25 yards north of this stone. —— French and Indian War —— — Map (db m30078) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bethel — Pilger Ruh
"Pilgrim's Rest" was the name given to this spring on the Tulpehocken Path by Count Zinzendorf, the Moravian missionary, on his journey to the Indian towns of Shamokin and Wyoming in 1742. — Map (db m29551) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bethel — 35 — Pilger Ruh

1742
Pilger Ruh (Pilgram's Rest)
Named by Count
Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf
who with Conrad Weiser and
Morvavian Missionaries rested here
besides this spring (Ludwig's Brunne)
on their way to visit Shawnee . . . — Map (db m30083) HM
Pennsylvania (Berks County), Bethel — Tulpehocken Path
Fort Henry, built 1756 to guard Lebanon Valley from Delaware and Shawnee raids, stood 3/4 mile northwest of here on the Tulpehocken Path. The trail came over the mt. near where present road cutting is seen. Round Head overlooks it from east. — Map (db m29542) HM
Pennsylvania (Bucks County), Washington Crossing — Washington Crossed the Delaware
Near this spot Washington crossed the Delaware on Christmas night 1776 the eve of the Battle of Trenton. — Map (db m13765) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — Harrisburg Giants
Harrisburg-based Negro League baseball team founded around 1900 and operated by Colonel William Strothers until his death in 1933. One of 27 major Negro League teams across the nation, the Giants finished in second place in the Eastern Colored . . . — Map (db m7103) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — Walnut Street Bridge
Oldest surviving bridge over the Susquehanna. Opened by the People's Bridge Co. in 1890. "Old Shakey," one of the last remaining multi-span Phoenix truss bridges, was a toll bridge until 1957. Flood damage, 1972, closed it to automobiles. Three of . . . — Map (db m7104) HM
Pennsylvania (Lebanon County), Annville — Indiantown
The native village from which, in turn, the Creek, Gap, and great Military Reservation derived their names, formerly stood near here. The Delaware Indians took this route to Shamokin, upon their removal from the Schuylkill region. — Map (db m30045) HM
Pennsylvania (Lebanon County), Annville — John Walter
Co-laborer of Jacob Albright in founding of Evangelical Church, born 1791, died 1818, is buried in this cemetery. An effective preacher and hymn writer, he published the first songbook for his church. — Map (db m30060) HM
Pennsylvania (Lebanon County), Annville — Reed's Fort
Just south of this point stood the house of Adam Reed, Esq. In 1755 it was turned into a fort. Here, with Rangers from Hanover Township, Reed protected the people of the countryside against Indian raids. — Map (db m30050) HM
Pennsylvania (Lehigh County), Allentown — Allentown
Founded 1762 by the noted colonial leader and jurist, William Allen. Known until 1834 as Northampton. Here the Liberty Bell was hidden in 1777, and Revolutionary wounded hospitalized. City incorporation, 1867. Long a textile and cement center. — Map (db m29531) HM
Pennsylvania (Lehigh County), Allentown — Lehigh County
Formed March 6, 1812 from part of Northampton County and named for the Lehigh River. Home of George Taylor, signer of Declaration of Independence. County seat of Allentown sheltered the Liberty Bell during occupation of Philadelphia, 1777-1778. — Map (db m29525) HM
Pennsylvania (Lehigh County), Allentown — Portland Cement
This industry was born in the Lehigh Valley. David O. Saylor first made portland cement at Coplay in 1871. Here also was the first use of the rotary kiln process commercially Nov. 8, 1889. This region has continued to lead in the industry. — Map (db m29935) HM
Pennsylvania (Luzerne County), Wilkes-Barre — Wilkes-Barre Fort
Completed 1778, Inclosing the courthouse of the Connecticut county of Westmoreland. Surrendered with Forty Fort to the British in 1778. — Map (db m19098) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bangor — Slate Industry
Robert M. Jones of Wales, who came here in 1848 as an immigrant, began the slate quarrying industry. The region became a major world center for slate. From here came slate for roofs and old-time school slates and pencils. — Map (db m29697) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Crown Inn
A two-story log inn, built here in 1745, was Bethlehem's first public house. Located near the ferry that crossed the Lehigh River, it was visited by famous political and military leaders of the era. A bridge replaced the ferry, 1794, and the inn . . . — Map (db m29831) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — David Tannenberg(1728-1804)
One of America’s foremost pipe organ builders. Tannenberg, born at Berthelsdorf, Germany, emigrated to the Moravian community at Bethlehem in 1749. From 1760-65 he lived at Burnside Plantation, where he built organs as an apprentice of Johann . . . — Map (db m29781) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Eugene Gifford Grace(1876-1960)
President, Bethlehem Steel, 1913-45, & chairman, 1946-57, lived here. A protégé of industrialist Charles M. Schwab, he helped make the company the U.S.'s largest shipbuilder & 2nd largest steelmaker - a formidable supplier in two world wars. — Map (db m29826) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — First House of Moravian Settlement
The first house of the Moravian settlement occupied March 9, 1741, stood on this site. In this house on Christmas Eve 1741 COUNT ZINZENDORF, conducting a love feast, named the place Bethlehem. — Map (db m29793) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Henry Noll(1871-1925)
The productivity of this Bethlehem Steel worker, referred to as "Schmidt," was key to Frederick W. Taylor's landmark book, "Principles of Scientific Management." Noll was credited with loading 45 tons of pig iron a day in 1899, to increase his day's . . . — Map (db m29931) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Hilda Doolittle(H.D.)
The renowned poet was born here on September 10, 1886; died in Zurich, September 27, 1961. H. D. sought the Hellenic spirit and a classic beauty of expression. She is buried in nearby Nisky Hill Cemetery. "O, give me burning blue." — Map (db m29796) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Moravian Archives
Repository for records of the Moravian Church, first organized in 1757. The Archives holds a unique collection of manuscripts, books, music and images relating to the history of the Moravians in North America from 1740 to the present. — Map (db m29782) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Moravian Cemetery
Used as a burial place, 1742-1910. Site selected and consecrated by Count von Zinzendorf. Only flat gravestones were permitted. Here are the graves of persons of various nationalities and races. — Map (db m29784) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Robert H. Sayre(1824-1907)
The engineer and philanthropist lived here. Directed construction, Lehigh Valley Railroad. A founder, Bethlehem Iron Co. Benefactor to St. Luke's Hospital, Church of the Nativity, and Bishopthorpe Girls School. Charter trustee, Lehigh University. — Map (db m29825) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — Samuel Wetherill(1821-1890)
Chemist, industrialist, inventor, and Civil War officer. In 1852 he developed a process for extracting white zinc oxide directly from zinc ore. In 1853 he founded the Lehigh Zinc Co., with a plant here, pioneering the manufacture of zinc spelter and . . . — Map (db m29932) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Bethlehem — The Unknown Soldier
Within this crypt rests the bones of an unknown soldier in the war for Independence. He was one of more than five hundred men who died in the hospital here at Bethlehem, and was buried on this hill side. — Map (db m29795) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — David Brainerd
The log house occupied by the Presbyterian missioner to the Indians in 1744 was a short distance away on the side road. It was here the youthful zealot wrote part of his famed journal. — Map (db m29617) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — David Martin's Ferry
Operated at "The Forks" on grants received in 1739 and 1741. It was an important link on a main route to the west until 1806. Transported troops and supplies in the Revolutionary War. — Map (db m29776) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Dr. Florence Seibert(1897-1991)
Birth site of the renowned biochemist. In spite of the handicap of polio, she developed in the 1920s a safe process for intravenous therapy. Later, in 1934, she refined the tuberculin skin test that was ultimately adopted worldwide. — Map (db m29743) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Easton
Key center of travel, trade and industry at the Forks of the Delaware since the days of the Indian. Laid out in 1752 by William Parsons. Site of several Indian peace councils. The home of Lafayette College. — Map (db m29529) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Easton
Key center of travel, trade and industry at the Forks of the Delaware since the days of the Indian. Laid out in 1752 by William Parsons. Site of several Indian peace councils. The home of Lafayette College. — Map (db m29602) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — First Reformed Church
Congregation organized 1745. This building, enlarged and restored, was erected, 1776. Scene of Indian Treaty, 1777. During the Revolutionary War, it was used as a military hospital. — Map (db m29741) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — George Taylor
One of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, member of Continental Congress, ironmaster, lived in this house built in 1757 by William Parsons, Surveyor-General. First occupied by Parsons. — Map (db m29777) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Lafayette College Founding
At White's Hotel near here, on Dec. 27, 1824, local citizens gathered to found Lafayette College. One of their leaders, James Madison Porter, had recently met Lafayette during the French general's well-received American tour of 1824-25, that revived . . . — Map (db m29724) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Lehigh Canal
This canal's 47 miles from Mauch Chunk to Easton were constructed 1827-1829. Here the Lehigh Canal connected with the Delaware Canal to Philadelphia, and with the Morris Canal to New York. Vital to the transport of anthracite coal and to the rise of . . . — Map (db m29601) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Northampton County
Formed March 11, 1752 out of Bucks County. Named for Northamptonshire in England. Easton, county seat, was incorporated in 1789. County is noted as a leading center for the steel industry and for cement and slate production. — Map (db m29597) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Portland Cement
This industry was born in the Lehigh Valley. David O. Saylor first made portland cement at Coplay in 1871. Here also was the first use of the rotary kiln process commercially Nov. 8, 1889. This region has continued to lead in the industry. — Map (db m29640) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Samuel Phillippe
Recognized as the inventor of the split-bamboo fishing rod in the U.S. His first rent and glued-up cane rod was made about 1846 in his gunsmith shop that stood on this site. — Map (db m29754) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Sullivan Campaign
This major expedition of the Revolution aimed at the Indian-Tory alliance in New York, was organized at Easton under Gen. John Sullivan. Over a month's preparations preceded the first day's march, begun near here June 18, 1779. — Map (db m29604) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Easton — Sullivan Expedition Against the Iroquois Indians1779
Sullivan Road over which the Army began its advance. June 18 1779. — Map (db m30108) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Nazareth — Christian Frederick Martin(1786–1867)
Founder in 1833 of C.F. Martin & Co. (The Martin Guitar Company), one of the world's oldest musical instrument manufacturers. Its innovations in acoustic guitar design-- including the x-braced flat-top guitar and Dreadnought guitar-- were to exert a . . . — Map (db m29580) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Nazareth — Henry's Gun Factory
Here rifles and other firearms were made for use in the War of 1812. Built by William Henry, 2nd, about 1800, the famous Henry shotgun was made here as late as 1904. The site is about half a mile away. — Map (db m29570) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Nazareth — Nazareth
Moravian settlers arrived here in 1740 from a failing colony in Georgia. Bishop August B. Spangenberg led an experiment in communal living, called the "Great Economy," 1745-1765. It was designed to support Christian missionaries to the Indians. — Map (db m29528) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Nazareth — Whitefield House
Whitefield House, planned by George Whitefield in 1740 when he obtained 5,000 acres of land for a Negro school and began by Peter Boehler and several Brethern. Purchased by the Moravians, 1741. Completed for a family house, 1743. Converted into a . . . — Map (db m29583) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Nazareth — Whitefield House
Begun in 1740 at request of Methodist missionary Reverend George Whitefield as a school for Negroes. Completed by the Moravians in 1743. Served as a communal church-home for 32 newly married German couples brought over in 1744. — Map (db m29584) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Tatamy — Moses Tunda Tatamy(ca. 1695 - ca. 1760)
A Delaware Indian of the Munsee branch, he exemplified the spirit of reconciliation. He lived on 315 acres northeast of here, patented to him by the Penns, 1738. Tatamy was the first Native American baptized by the famed David Brainerd, 1745. An . . . — Map (db m29595) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Wind Gap — Sullivan Expedition Against the Iroquois Indians1779
Heller's Tavern The end of the day's march June 18, 1779 Distance 12 miles — Map (db m30152) HM
Pennsylvania (Northampton County), Wind Gap — Sullivan's March
Heller's Tavern near Wind Gap was the site for Sullivan's army at the end of the first day's march from Easton, June 18, 1779. The army was astir at 4 the next morning, crossing the mountains at Wind Gap. — Map (db m29722) HM
South Carolina (Darlington County), Darlington — 16-51 — “Yankee Hill”
[Front]: In the summer of 1865, just after the end of the Civil War, Federal troops began their occupation of many cities and towns in S.C. Units in Darlington in 1865-1866 included the 15th Maine Infantry, 29th Maine Veteran Volunteers. They . . . — Map (db m13570) HM
South Carolina (Darlington County), Darlington — 16-37 — Darlington Raceway
Marker Front: Darlington Raceway, the first superspeedway in NASCAR history, was constructed in 1950 by Harold Brasington, a local race promoter who saw an asphalt-paved track as an advance over the standard dirt tracks and wanted a 500-mile . . . — Map (db m30634) HM
South Carolina (Florence County), Florence — 21-26 — Atomic Bomb Accident at Mars Bluff, March 11, 1958
[Marker Front] In 1958, in the midst of the Cold War, the U.S. Air Force accidentally dropped an atomic bomb near here. The unarmed 7,600-lb., 10'8"-long bomb was aboard a B-47E bomber on a training mission headed for England. Its . . . — Map (db m23628) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — 2A 99 — First Coca-Cola Bottling Company In The United States
On July 21, 1899, two Chattanooga lawyers, Benjamin Franklin Thomas and Joseph Brown Whitehead, signed a contract with the Coca-Cola Company granting them the exclusive rights to bottle Coca-Cola in most of the United States. Another Chattanooga . . . — Map (db m15703) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — 2A 89 — Martin Hotel1924-1985 — Chattanooga, Tennessee
For sixty-one years the Martin Hotel was located at this site. Established in 1924 by Robert Martin with 50 rooms it became the largest African-American hotel in the South. Many celebrities and entertainers such as: Ella Fitzgerald, The Ink Spots, . . . — Map (db m15648) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Lookout Mountain — 2A 57 — Summertown
Summertown, the first community on Lookout Mountain, was in this general area. The Lookout Mountain Hotel and its cottages were erected here in 1856 by Colonel James A. Whiteside and associates. Guests came up a toll road in carriages which met . . . — Map (db m13844) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Lookout Mountain — 2A 56 — The University of The South
Founded here July 4, 1857, when its first trustees, representing Episcopal dioceses in ten Southern states, met to adopt the plan of Bishop (later Confederate General) Leonidas Polk for a university to be sponsored by the Episcopal Church. Following . . . — Map (db m13839) HM
Tennessee (Sullivan County), Bristol — 1A 137 — Birthplace of Bristol
The town of Bristol was planned and laid out by Joseph Rhea Anderson in 1852. Development began on this site in 1853 with the erection of Anderson's combined home and business. The building served as the community's first store, post office, bank, . . . — Map (db m22991) HM
Tennessee (Unicoi County), Erwin — 1A 115 — The Battle of Red Banks / Reunion for the Boys in Blue
Marker Front: On December 29, 1864, the Third Regiment of North Carolina Mounted Infantry, under Colonel George W.Kirk, engaged about 400 Confederate Infantry and Cavalry under Lt.Colonel James A.Keith at Red Banks of the Nolichucky. Seventy . . . — Map (db m22804) HM
Vermont (Chittenden County), Burlington — Centennial Field
Named to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the University of Vermont’s first graduating class, Centennial Field has been the home of UVM athletics since 1906. The three ballparks that have stood on this site have hosted semi-professional and . . . — Map (db m23429) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Brownsville — The Rothwell Family ... / Elisha Wm. Robertson ...
The Rothwell Family of Albemarle County Virginia. Claiborne one of the first of the Rothwells to live in this county, was born about 1741 as reported in The Virginia Advocate, Saturday Oct. 11, 1828 and “died on Oct. 6 in his 87th . . . — Map (db m3996) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-163 — Revolutionary Soldiers Graves
Jesse Pitman Lewis (d. March 8, 1849), of the Virginia Militia, and Taliaferro Lewis (d. July 12, 1810), of the Continental Line, two of several brothers who fought in the War for Independence, are buried in the Lewis family cemetery 100 yards south . . . — Map (db m3994) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Site of Viewmont
Built before 1744 by Col. Joshua Fry 1699-1754 Surveyor, Mathematician, Pioneer Commander-in-Chief of Virginia Forces French and Indian War George Washington Inscribed over his Grave “Here lies the good, the just and the noble . . . — Map (db m23244) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — GA-46 — Southern Albemarle Rural Historic District
Bounded by the James River to the south and the Rivanna River to the north, this nationally significant district encompasses 83,627 acres. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007, it includes buildings influenced by Jefferson’s . . . — Map (db m23240) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Viewmont
Birthplace of Lottie Moon Baptist Missionary to China 1873-1912 — Map (db m23041) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Gordonsville — Z-151 — Albemarle County/Louisa County
ALBEMARLE COUNTY Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1737 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle . . . — Map (db m22780) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-161 — Birthplace of Meriwether Lewis
Half a mile north was born, 1774, Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, sent by Jefferson to explore the far west, 1804–1806. The expedition reached the mouth of the Columbia River, November 15, 1805. — Map (db m1795) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-162 — Jackson’s Valley Campaign
Late in April 1862, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson marched his army out of the Shenandoah Valley through the Blue Ridge Mountains to deceive Union Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont into thinking he was headed for Richmond. On 3 May, . . . — Map (db m1797) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-204 — Castle Hill
The original house was built in 1765 by Thomas Walker, explorer and pioneer. Tarleton, raiding Charlottesville to capture Jefferson and the legislature, stopped here for breakfast, June 4, 1781. This delay aided the patriots to escape. Castle Hill . . . — Map (db m22439) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-205 — Revolutionary War Campaign of 1781Mechunk Creek
After reinforcements from Brig. Gen "Mad" Anthony Wayne arrived on 10 June 1781, the Marquis de Lafayette moved south from his camp on the Rapidan River to prevent further raids by Gen. Charles Cornwallis British troops encamped at Elk Hill. By 13 . . . — Map (db m22617) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — GA-43 — Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District
Extending from the Orange County line on the north to the outskirts of Charlottesville with the Southwest Mountains forming its spine, this historic district encompasses more than 31,000 acres and contains some of the Piedmont’s most pristine and . . . — Map (db m17447) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Lindsay — JE-6 — Maury’s School
Just north was a classical school conducted by the Rev. James Maury, rector of Fredericksville Parish from 1754 to 1769. Thomas Jefferson was one of Maury’s students. Matthew Fontaine Maury, the “Pathfinder of the Seas,” was Maury’s . . . — Map (db m17459) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Midway — W-225 — Miller School
W 225 A bequest of Samuel Miller (1792–1869) provided funds to found the Miller School in 1878. Miller, a Lynchburg businessman born in poverty in Albemarle County, envisioned a regional school for children who could not afford an education. . . . — Map (db m21699) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Proffit — G-22 — Proffit Historic District
Ben Brown and other newly freed slaves, who founded the community after the Civil War, first named the settlement Egypt and then Bethel. About 1881, the community became known as Proffit when the Virginia Midland Railway placed a stop here, . . . — Map (db m16946) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — ScottsvilleWhen War Came
At 3 p.m. on Monday, March 6, 1865, the first of Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s 10,000 cavalrymen under Gens. Wesley Merritt, Thomas Devin, and George A. Custer entered Scottsville unopposed. To accomplish their mission—destroy the James . . . — Map (db m17844) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Scottsville Confederate Cemetery
In memory of the soldiers who died in the Confederate General Hospital in Scottsville 1862-1863 Beattie, F.M. Co. H 23 NC Boyle, Andrew Co. D 41 VA Brashear, Denis P. Co. E 4 AL Clark, Henry Co. E 15 AL Clark, Hosey L. Co. F 2 MS . . . — Map (db m22784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Shadwell — W-202 — Shadwell, Birthplace of Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson—author of the Declaration of Independence, third president of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia—was born near this site on 13 April 1743. His father, Peter Jefferson (1708–1757), a . . . — Map (db m17306) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Simeon — FL-8 — Ash Lawn – Highland
This estate was the home of James Monroe, fifth president of the United States. In 1793, James and Elizabeth Kortright Monroe purchased 1,000 acres adjoining Jefferson’s Monticello. Called Highland, the plantation, eventually totaling 3,500 acres, . . . — Map (db m23437) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Abingdon Plantation Restoration
The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority worked in concert with Federal, state and local historic preservation agencies and professionals in the field to develop the restoration plan for the Abingdon Plantation site. The restoration process . . . — Map (db m8386) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Doswell — ND-10 — Meadow FarmBirthplace of Secretariat
This famous horsebreeding farm was established in 1936 by Christopher T. Chenery and continued under the management of his daughter, Helen “Penny” Chenery until 1979. Secretariat (1970–-1989), also known as “Big Red,” . . . — Map (db m1890) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1d — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m8643) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1b — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19843) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1a — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19844) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — G-23 — James Monroe’s First FarmSite of the University of Virginia
In 1788 James Monroe purchased an 800-acre farm here to be close to his friend Thomas Jefferson and to establish a law office. In 1799 the Monroes moved to their new Highland plantation adjacent to Monticello and sold the first farm. In 1817 the . . . — Map (db m8762) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Meriwether Lewis and William Clark1774–1809, 1770–1838
Bold and farseeing pathfinders who carried the flag of the young republic to the western ocean and revealed an unknown empire to the uses of mankind. A territory of 385000 square miles was added to the country by the efforts of these men, an . . . — Map (db m8353) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — President Monroe’s Local Homes
In 1789 James Monroe moved to Charlottesville and for one year his home was located in the first block west of this site. Then he lived for nine years in the home he built on what is now called “Monroe Hill” at the University of . . . — Map (db m19808) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Sacajawea
This plaque is dedicated to Sacajawea, whose contribution of traditional and cultural knowledge, with courage and bravery, earned her recognition in the chronicles of American History. Sacajawea was a Lemhi Shoshone (Agaidika) born in Salmon, . . . — Map (db m21757) HM
Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Benjamin Berry
——1720(?)–1810—— Benjamin Berry, son of Henry Berry of King George County, settled in what is now Clarke County prior to the Revolution, and in 1798, he procured the formal establishment of the town of . . . — Map (db m1810) HM
Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — T-2 — Old Chapel
Lord Fairfax worshipped here in the “Old Chapel” of colonial Frederick Parish, established 1738. This stone building dates from 1790 and witnessed the early ministry (1810–1885) of Bishop Meade. Governor Edmund Randolph and Col. . . . — Map (db m1852) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Brandy Station — The Battle of Brandy StationRooney Lee's Fighting Retreat
The Federal forces of Brig. Gen. John Buford, Brig. Gen. David Gregg, and Col. Thomas Devin (whose command held the area around St. James Church) had almost encircled the Confederates, though none of the Union commanders had planned it so. Unknown . . . — Map (db m4418) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Culpeper — F-25A — Mitchells Presbyterian Church
Built in 1879, this Gothic Revival church stands two miles of this location. It contains an elaborate example of trompe-l’oeil fresco painting done in 1888. Joseph Dominick Phillip Oddenino, an Italian immigrant artist, painted to deceive the eye . . . — Map (db m23192) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Mitchells — Z-279 — Culpeper County / Orange County
(South facing side): Culpeper County Area 384 Square Miles Formed in 1748 from Orange, and named for Lord Culpeper, Governor of Virginia, 1680-1683. The Battle of Cedar Mountain, 1862, was fought in this county. (North facing . . . — Map (db m23774) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Mitchells — F-25 — Mitchells Presbyterian Church
This Gothic Revival church, built in 1879, contains an elaborate example of trompe-l’oeil fresco painting done in 1888. Joseph Dominick Phillip Oddenino, an Italian immigrant artist, painted to deceive the eye into believing that his plaster murals . . . — Map (db m23373) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Stevensburg — J-32 — Salubria
Just south stands Salubria, a rare estate of Georgian architecture in Virginia's Piedmont. The house is notable for its elegant proportions, fine Flemish-bond brickwork, and superb interior paneling. Salubria probably was constructed in the . . . — Map (db m4580) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Ivakota Farm
On this land stood Ivakota Farm, founded as a Progressive Era reform school and home for unwed mothers and their children. In 1915 Ella Shaw donated her 264-acre farm to the National Florence Crittenton Mission (NFCM). Named for the states where she . . . — Map (db m7401) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Herndon — C-24 — Laura Ratcliffe
Confederate spy Laura Ratcliffe was born in Fairfax County in 1836. During the Civil War, she became an acquaintance of Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart who introduced her to then-Lt. John Mosby in 1862. Mosby credited her with preventing his capture . . . — Map (db m1642) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Markham — FF-12 — The Hollow
In 1765, John Marshall, then nine, moved with his family from his birthplace 30 miles southeast to a small, newly constructed frame house one-quarter mile east known as The Hollow. The house built by his father, Thomas Marshall, was his home until . . . — Map (db m23940) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Lafayette’s Stepping Stone
During his 1825 visit to Warrenton, General Lafayette is said to have stood upon this stone. Courtesy: The Bartenstein Family — Map (db m1294) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Gore — B-17 — Willow Shade
This house, built in 1858, was the childhood home of novelist Willa Cather from 1874 to 1883, when she moved with her family to Nebraska. It was the setting of the final chapters of her novel SAPPHIRA AND THE SLAVE . . . — Map (db m3095) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — A-9 — Battle of Kernstown
On the hill to the west, Stonewall Jackson late in the afternoon of March 23, 1862 attacked the Union force under Shields holding Winchester. After a fierce action, Jackson, who was greatly outnumbered, withdrew southward, leaving his dead on the . . . — Map (db m3150) HM
Virginia (Greene County), Ruckersville — Z-14 — Orange County / Greene County
(West Side):Orange CountyFormed from Spotsylvania County in 1734, Orange County, a pastoral Piedmont county, was probably named in honor of William IV, the Dutch prince of Orange, who married Anne, the Princess Royal, daughter of George . . . — Map (db m24228) HM
Virginia (Louisa County), Louisa — W-211 — Patrick Henry's Home
At Roundabout Plantation, eight miles southwest, Patrick Henry lived from 1765 to 1768, when he sat for Louisa County in the House of Burgesses. This was the beginning of his political career. — Map (db m4829) HM
Virginia (Louisa County), Mineral — W-216 — Civilian Conservation Corps Company 2359
This is the site of Camp P-82, CCC Company 2359, Mineral Virginia. The camp was established in 1934 and provided work for more than two hundred young men during the depths of the Great Depression. Their responsibilities included clearing forest . . . — Map (db m24277) HM
Virginia (Montgomery County), Lafayette — KG-12 — Montgomery White Sulphur Springs
Near here stood Montgomery White Sulphur Springs, popular resort area of 19th century America. During the Civil War the resort was converted into a military hospital staffed by Catholic nuns. Several hundred victims of smallpox including nurses and . . . — Map (db m3851) HM
Virginia (Nelson County), Afton — W-218 — Rockfish Gap Meeting
The commission appointed to select a site for the University of Virginia met 1-4 August 1818 in the tavern that stood nearby. Among the 21 members present were former presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, as well as judges Spencer Roane, . . . — Map (db m21831) HM
Virginia, Norfolk — KN-1 — Hospital of St. Vincent dePaul
Founded in 1855, the Hospital of St. Vincent dePaul was Norfolk’s first civilian hospital. Located two blocks south at the corner of Church and Wood strees, the hospital was opened in the home of Ann Plume Behan Herron by eight Daughters of Charity . . . — Map (db m3324) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — J-34 — Germanna
Here Governor Alexander Spotswood established a colony of Germans in 1714. At that time the Rapidan River was the frontier of Virginia. On August 29, 1716, Spotswood left from this place with the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe on his exploring . . . — Map (db m3900) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Z-167 — Orange County / Spotsylvania County
(East Facing Side): Orange County Area Formed from Spotsylvania County in 1734, Orange County, a pastoral Piedmont county, was probably named in honor of William IV, the Dutch prince of Orange, who married Anne, the Princess Royal, . . . — Map (db m4321) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Orange — JJ-4 — Bloomsbury
A mile north is Bloomsbury, estate of the pioneer, James Taylor, ancestor of Presidents James Madison and Zachary Taylor. He was a member of Spotswood's expedition over the mountains in 1716. — Map (db m4699) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Orange — F-26 — Montpelier and Madison's Tomb
Five miles southwest is Montpelier, the home of James Madison, "Father of the American Constitution" and fourth president of the United States, 1809-1817. Near the house is the tomb of Madison, who died at Montpelier on June 28, 1836. — Map (db m4703) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Orange — Z-12 — Orange County / Madison County
(North Facing Side): Orange County Formed from Spotsylvania County in 1734, Orange County, a pastoral Piedmont county, was probably named in honor of William IV, the Dutch prince of Orange, who married Anne, the Princess Royal, daughter . . . — Map (db m4758) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Somerset — James Madison and Dolley Madison
Near this spot are buried James Madison "Father of the Constitution" Fourth President of the United States 1809-1817 and Dolley Madison his wife — Map (db m24226) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — 65 — Colonial Roads
The town of Haymarket, chartered in 1799, owes its location to the junction of the Old Carolina Road and the north branch of the Dumfries Road at the site of the Red House. The Carolina Road developed from the Iroquois hunting path which was . . . — Map (db m766) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — F-14 — Simon Kenton’s Birthplace
Near Hopewell Gap, five miles west, Simon Kenton was born, 1755. Leaving home in 1771, he became an associate of Daniel Boone and George Rogers Clark in Indian fighting. He won fame as a scout and as one of the founders of Kentucky. Kenton died in . . . — Map (db m106) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — 63 — The Carolina Road
The Carolina Road, earlier an Indian hunting path, roughly approximating Route 15 at this point, derived its name from trade between Frederick, Maryland, and Georgia. Later the road was used by settlers emigrating to western lands. Because of . . . — Map (db m105) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Prince William County World War I Memorial
Dedicated to the Citizens of Prince William County who lost their lives in the service of their country in the the 1917 - World War - 1919 Fewell Athey • Carrington Bailey • Maurice Beavers • John Blackwell • John C. . . . — Map (db m21983) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Thoroughfare — 68 — Free People Of Color At Thoroughfare
Families of African-American, Native American, and mixed ancestry migrated here from Fauquier, Culpeper, Rappahannock and Warren Counties after the Civil War. The Allen, Berry, Fletcher, Nickens, and Peyton families, along with former slaves from . . . — Map (db m974) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Woodbridge — 5 — William Grayson’s Grave
William Grayson, lawyer, member of the Continental Congress, Constitutional Convention and U.S. Senate, is buried nearby on property formerly part of “Belle Air,” the family plantation. In 1774, Grayson organized Prince William County’s . . . — Map (db m770) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Five Mile Fork — J-42 — Spotswood’s Furnace
Four miles north, on this side road, is the site of an ancient iron furnace established about 1716 by Governor Alexander Spotswood, the first fully equipped iron furnace in the colonies. Iron was hauled along this road to the Rappahannock River for . . . — Map (db m1659) HM
Virginia, Waynesboro — W-160 — Early’s Last Battle
On the ridge west of Waynesboro occurred the last engagement of Confederate forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early. Portions of Maj.Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's army, including cavalry led by Maj.Gen.George A. Custer attacked and routed . . . — Map (db m4238) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Gauley Bridge — Gauley Bridge
Here New and Gauley rivers unite to form Great Kanawha River. Piers still stand of old bridge destroyed by the Confederate troops in 1861. Here Thomas Dunn English, author of the ballad, "Ben Bolt," wrote "Gauley River". — Map (db m20818) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — "Blakeley"
Home of General Washington's grandnephew, John Augustine Washington, who later became the owner of Mount Vernon. "Blakeley", built about 1820, was partially burned a few years later and then rebuilt in it present form. (1 1/2 Mi.W.) — Map (db m12640) HM

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