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Ramsay House, Alexandria's Visitor's Center image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, August 6, 2005
Ramsay House, Alexandria's Visitor's Center
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Old Greenwich Yacht Club
On July 18, 1640, Daniel Patrick and Robert Feaks landed on these shores in the name of the New Haven Colony to start a new settlement, later called Greenwich. This neck of land is called Elizabeth’s Neck after Mrs. Feaks. The anchor above this . . . — Map (db m2048) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Fort Bayard
Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865. No visible evidence remains of Fort Bayard, which stood at the top of this hill. Named for Brig. Gen. George Bayard, mortally wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. — Map (db m124) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Capitol Columns
These 22 Corinthian sandstone columns were among 24 that were part of the east portico of the United States Capitol. Architect Charles Bullfinch oversaw construction of the portico using a design handed down by his predecessors, William Thornton and . . . — Map (db m918) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Morrison Azalea Garden
Assembled in this garden is a permanent collection of the Glenn Dale Hybrid Azaleas, originated, selected, and named by B. Y. Morrison, first Director of the U.S. National Arboretum. — Map (db m966) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — National Capitol Columns
The presence of the National Capitol Columns on the knoll in this meadow was the inspiration of Ethel Shields Garrett, patron and friend of the National Arboretum. It was through her vision, courage, and determination for thirty years that these . . . — Map (db m917) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — At All Hours
“It shall be their duty, at all hours, by night as well as by day, to pass all boats and floats presenting themselves at their locks.” —Charles Mercer, President, C&O Canal Company. Every time his boat passed through a lock, a . . . — Map (db m128) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Chesapeake & Ohio Canal
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal. Commenced at Georgetown. July 4th 1828. Chief Engineer Benjamin Wright. Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company, 1850. President James M. Coale. Directors William A. Bradley, Henry Daingerfield, Wm. Cost Johnson, John . . . — Map (db m118) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Creating a National Park
“It is a refuge, a place of retreat, a long stretch of quiet and peace at the Capital's back door . . .” —William O. Douglas Look around you. The park you stand in exists because people cared. In January 1954, Justice William O. . . . — Map (db m129) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Francis Scott Key
1779-1843. The author of our National Anthem was a lawyer, patriot, community leader and poet. His home and law office stood approximately 100 yards west of here. Francis Scott Key lived there from 1803 to about 1833 with his wife, the former Mary . . . — Map (db m120) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Francis Scott Key Park
A Place With Its Own History. Before 1620 the area of the Francis Scott Key Park was inhabited by members of the Algonquian, Nacostine, Nacotchatank, Piscatoway and Patawomeke tribes. In 1634 it became part of the English Colony of . . . — Map (db m119) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Georgetown Historic District
Has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the history of the United States. — Map (db m130) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Palisades — Abner Cloud House
This house witnessed the building of the C&O Canal. Abner Cloud, a miller who had come here from Pennsylvania, built the house in 1801. Cloud's mill was about 200 yards upstream. The basement of the house was used by Cloud to store grain and flour, . . . — Map (db m722) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Bulfinch Gate House
Erected about 1828 under direction of Charles Bulfinch, Architect of the Capitol, this gate house stood until 1874 with another (now at 17th and Constitution Avenue) at the west entrance to the Capitol Grounds — Map (db m245) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Joseph Henry
This statue of the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution was made in 1881 by the American sculptor William Wetmore Storey, then working in Rome. Unveiled April 19, 1883. — Map (db m213) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — The Canal Connection
President George Washington commissioned Pierre L'Enfant to design the Capital City in 1790. The L'Enfant Plan included a system of canals to transport heavy goods at a time when roads and streets were few and muddy. The Washington City Canal . . . — Map (db m211) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — The Washington City Canal
Completed in 1815, the canal extended east of this point along the line of Constitution Avenue and south around the Capitol with branches leading into the Anacostia River. — Map (db m210) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Vietnam Veterans Memorial
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial honors the courage, sacrifice, and devotion to duty and country of the men and women of the armed forces of the United States who served in America's longest war. By virtue of its design, the memorial inspires a . . . — Map (db m212) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — Japanese Pagoda
Admired by thousands each year, the Japanese Pagoda arrived in Washington, not as a gift from one nation to another, but as a gift from one man to another. In 1957, Ryozo Hiranuma, the Mayor of Yokohama and a visitor to Washington, DC four years . . . — Map (db m309) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — The 1912 Cherry Tree Plantings
Historic Trees. You are standing near two of the most important cherry trees in Washington, D.C. These Yoshino Cherries (Prunus x yedoensis) are among the 3,700 trees of various species that grow in East and West Potomac Park and on the . . . — Map (db m215) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
At this site will be erected the Martin Luther King, Jr .Memorial. The memorial will embody the man, the movement and the message. It will honor this 20th century visionary who brought about change through the principles of nonviolence and equally . . . — Map (db m208) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Babe’s Dream
George Herman “Babe” Ruth, Baltimorean. Feb. 6, 1895 – Aug. 16, 1948. — Map (db m708) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Orpheus
The heroic bronze figure in front of you is not, as many suppose, a likeness of Francis Scott Key. The statue represents Orpheus, the artful poet, musician, and singer of Greek Mythology. In 1914 Congress appropriated funds for a . . . — Map (db m707) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Elicott City — The George Ellicott House
This house was built in 1789 by George Ellicott, a Quaker, who was a miller, surveyor, merchant and astronomer. He was friend and advisor to America's first black man of science, Benjamin Banneker, who visited here. He also entertained Chief Little . . . — Map (db m193) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Ellicott City — Ellicott’s Mills
Established 1772 by the three Ellicott brothers from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. They opened the road from here to Baltimore. The B. and O. R. R. was completed to this point May 20, 1830. — Map (db m175) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Relay — The Thomas Viaduct
Front Commenced, July 4th, 1833. Finished, July 4th, 1835. Rear Johnathan Knight, Chief Engineer Caspar W. Wever, Superintendent of Construction. Designed by Benjamin H. Latrobe. . . . — Map (db m127) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — Old Post Road: Lower Susquehanna Ferry
Old Post Road established 1666. Lower Susquehanna Ferry established 1695. Rodgers’ Tavern where George Washington frequently stopped between 1781–1798. — Map (db m1482) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — Rev. Lawrence Anthony Bender, S.S.
  November 14, 1924 – February 5, 2004 Education. St. Mary’s Elementary, Notre Dame High School, Bryantown, MD 1931–1942 • St. Charles College Seminary, Catonsville, MD 1942–1945 • Bachelor’s Degree, St. Mary’s Seminary, . . . — Map (db m926) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church
In 1700 a frame chapel ministered by Jesuit missionaries was attached to the home of Major William Boardman. Father David erected a church in 1793. Under Father Courtney in 1845 a new brick church was begun which is the middle section of the present . . . — Map (db m925) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Dr. Samuel A. MuddTreating an Assassin — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin
This house was the home of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd and his wife, Sarah Frances Dyer. Early on the morning of April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth arrived here with a companion, David E. Herold, and asked Mudd to set Booth’s broken leg. Afterward, as . . . — Map (db m921) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Home of Dr. Samuel Mudd(1833–1883)
John Wilkes Booth rested here for several hours on April 15, 1865, after receiving treatment for his broken leg. — Map (db m920) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m922) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — Train No. 286 Bell Memorial
(below the window) Preserve the memory of train crew by ringing this bell for Ricky, Jimmy and Jim. (above the window) The bricks which make up the base of the bell memorial came from the B & O roundhouse that once stood in . . . — Map (db m1981) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksConfederates Capture Train — Gettysburg Campaign
In mid-June 1863, with rumors of a pending reinvasion of Maryland by Confederate forces, most Baltimore and Ohio trains stopped running past here. As tension mounted, the New York Times reported that no trains were departing Baltimore, “except . . . — Map (db m743) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksPoint of Rocks During the War
The rail line immediately before you served as an important means of supply and communication during the Civil War (the station, and tracks to Washington, D.C., on the southern or right side of the station were built later). Here at Point of Rocks, . . . — Map (db m744) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m192) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — MaryLandscapes
The Bay is part of a vast interconnected ecosystem. Everything done on land affects the Bay and the plants and animals that live there. Who is affected by the health of the Chesapeake Bay? The 48 major rivers, 100 smaller rivers, and . . . — Map (db m149) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Road Versus RailsThe Rivalry Begins
Ellicott City’s Main Street is the National Pike, part of the road system that moved Americans west. Only two decades after the road was constructed, a new transportation rival appeared. In 1831, America’s first railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio, . . . — Map (db m720) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — The National Road
This marker stands on a part of the right of way of the historic and fabled National, or Cumberland Road. Commencing in 1806 it was built in segments by city, state, federal, and private means and was the first great commercial and travel link from . . . — Map (db m131) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Five Points, Historic Crossroads
This commemorative site known as "Five Points," has been used as a commercial crossroads for almost 300 years. Its name was derived from the old Indian trails which are now merged and identified as Edgemoor Lane, Wisconsin Avenue, East West Highway . . . — Map (db m84) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Robert W. Leibling
In loving memory of Robert W. Leibling, Husband, Father, WWII Captain, Community Leader, Executive. 1923–2000. Robert W. Lebling gave to the community with passion, just as he loved his family and friends. Highly respected for his civic . . . — Map (db m85) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Georgetown Branch Railroad
The Capital Crescent Trail follows the route of an old railroad line called the Georgetown Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O). It's all that remains of an unrealized attempt by the B&O to construct a major rail link between the . . . — Map (db m83) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m809) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m808) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Springing Over the MonocacyThe Enduring Aqueduct
Springing Over the Monocacy. Captain William McNeill of the U.S. Topographical Engineers called this aqueduct “...a work which, while it is highly ornamental, unites...in its plan and execution, ‘the true principles of economy, usefulness . . . — Map (db m714) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s Ferry
Before you is the last operating ferry on the Potomac River. Early settlers recognized these relatively still waters would provide an ideal location for a ferry. The first known ferry operation here was Conrad’s Ferry in 1817. After the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m741) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryInvasion or Liberation. — Antietam Campaign 1862
The serenity of the Maryland countryside was shattered on September 4-6, 1862, as 35,000 Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia waded across the Potomac River. Gen. Robert E. Lee, hoping to rally support in the divided state, sent . . . — Map (db m807) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FordCrossing the Potomac — Antietam Campaign 1862
A wing of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia commanded by Gen. James Longstreet, as well as part of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, crossed into Maryland just south of here on September 5-6, 1862. Other parts of the 40,000-man force, . . . — Map (db m812) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Emery Corners — Early Blacksmith Shop
Originally a blacksmith shop, this home was built in the middle of the eighteenth century. It stands on a tract once known as “Magruder’s Honesty.” Believed to have been built by Ninian Magruder, Senior (d. 1751), it is one of the oldest . . . — Map (db m916) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station
Built: 1884. The Gaithersburg Railroad Station and freight house were built in 1884 as handsome replacements for the adjacent small frame structure which served as a freight depot when the Metropolitan Branch of the B & O Railroad was extended . . . — Map (db m1039) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — General Edward Braddock
General Edward Braddock in April 1755, accompanied by Gov. Horatio Sharpe of Maryland, traveled this road in a coach and six horses, on his way to Frederick, Md. to meet Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, to arrange for teams for the Fort . . . — Map (db m1012) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross posthumously to Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III, United States Marine Corps Reserve, for service as set forth in the following Citation: For extraordinary . . . — Map (db m331) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Garrett Park — Garrett Park Waiting Room
In 1989, this passenger waiting room was taken down from its location in Landover, MD., and brought to this site and re-assembled by the Montgomery County Conservation Corps. On behalf of the citizens of Garrett Park, the Mayor and Town Council . . . — Map (db m219) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — A Trolley Returns to Glen Echo
Development of Trolleys. Electric trolleys were introduced to the United States in 1888 in Richmond, Virginia, and quickly became the predominant mode of public transportation used throughout the first third of the 20th century. These vehicles . . . — Map (db m306) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — Glen Echo From Past to Present
For more than 100 years this land, now Glen Echo Park, has been dedicated to the people: first in 1891 as a National Chautauqua Assembly, a center where people could participate in the sciences, arts, languages, and literature; second in 1899 as a . . . — Map (db m380) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Clara Barton House
Early headquarters of the American Red Cross and home of Clara Barton, founder and First President, who lived here until her death in 1912. Located just south of this marker, the house had an unusual interior of Steamboat Gothic design with railed . . . — Map (db m303) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Martinsburg — White’s Ford
About 2 miles northwest was White’s Ford. This Potomac crossing was used by Gen. R. E. Lee entering Maryland in September, 1862, and Generals J.E.B. Stuart and Jubal A. Early returning to Virginia in 1862 and 1864, respectively. — Map (db m811) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — “Out of Robb’s Window, Montgomery County Courthouse.”
Architect Benjamin Latrobe came to “Montgomery Court House” in 1811 hoping that the fresh air would help his ailing young son recover his health. He stayed at Adam Robb’s tavern that may have been located on Lot 4 on Jefferson Street . . . — Map (db m92) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson House and Park
The Beall-Dawson property originally extended from Montgomery Avenue west to Forest Avenue and north to Martins Lane. The house was built in 1815 by Upton Beall, Clerk of the Montgomery County Court. It is a 2 1/2 story brick Federal-style home . . . — Map (db m224) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Christ Episcopal Church
The first Episcopal church in or near Rockville was built in 1739 on a two-acre parcel of land, part of which is now the Rockville Cemetery. It was constructed of clapboards and logs and was called both the "Chapel of Ease" and Rock Creek Chapel. . . . — Map (db m91) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Court House Square"Burning with Enthusiasm" — Gettysburg Campaign
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville, the Montgomery County seat, on June 28, 1863, to a boisterous reception. One soldier described “a spectacle which was truly pleasing . . . It was Sunday, . . . — Map (db m65) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m73) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — John C. Brown Memorial Bridge
The John C. Brown (Corp’l U. S. Army) Memorial Bridge dedicated August 26, 1950, to the memory of the first Maryland soldier killed in action in Korea

June 30, 1950. — Map (db m90) HM

Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock and His Men
To commemorate the encampment in Maryland of Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock and his men at Owen's Ordinary, now Rockville, April 20, 1755. This stone is placed by the Janet Montgomery Chapter, Daughters of he American Revolution, Mrs. Morris L. Croxall, . . . — Map (db m77) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Montgomery County Jail
In 1777, seven commissioners were appointed to purchase a plot of land not exceeding four acres, for building a court house and prison for Montgomery County. In 1777, both court and jail were located in the former Hungerford Tavern on South . . . — Map (db m330) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — North Adams Street and Middle Lane Residential Area
The area at North Adams Street and Middle Lane has four of the oldest surviving Rockville homes: 101, 106, and 5 North Adams, and the Beall-Dawson House. The 1793 portion of the house at 5 North Adams is probably the oldest structure in . . . — Map (db m81) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville
Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's Confederate Cavalry occupied Rockville June 28, 1863, and captured 150 U.S. wagons along the Washington Road. From here they marched to Gettysburg. In July, 1864, Gen. Jubal Early passed through Rockville on his way to and from . . . — Map (db m59) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville
County seat of Montgomery (formerly part of Frederick) County. Made the county seat in 1776. Created a town by act of assembly 1801. Site of Hungerford Tavern where in 1774 resolution of sympathy for Boston was adopted and severance of trade with . . . — Map (db m60) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Rockville Academy
In 1805, the Maryland General Assembly appointed a commission to raise money for a school lot and a fire engine for Rockville. The Rockville Academy was chartered and authorized to hire teachers in 1809. In 1812 and 1813, a number of lots were . . . — Map (db m94) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Saint Mary’s Church
St. Mary’s Church, built in 1817, is the oldest church still in use in Rockville. Rockville was chosen for the church location for its relatively large concentration of Catholics, it central location, and its prominence as the County seat. St. . . . — Map (db m61) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Bingham-Brewer House
This two-story Federal structure is significant for its architecture and for its personal associations. The house is one of only two pre-1830 brick structures still intact in Rockville. The front section is 24-feet high and 24-feet wide. It rests . . . — Map (db m226) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Prettyman House
This house was built on a 13.5-acre lot on the outskirts of Rockville in 1842. A stone marking the southwest corner of the original 1803 Rockville Plan is between this house and the adjacent Rockville Academy grounds. Matilda Holland, widow of . . . — Map (db m74) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — The Thin Gray Line
To our heroes of Montgomery Co. Maryland. That we through life may not forget to live the thin gray line. 1861 -CSA- 1865. — Map (db m79) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Veirs Mill
Veirs Mill was built by Samuel Clark Veirs in 1838. It was operated by Veirs and Co., or Veirs and Bros., for 89 years. Known by many as Rock Creek Mills, it drew customers from Rockville and Mitchel's Crossroads (now Wheaton), through a route that . . . — Map (db m78) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Planetary Radio Emissions Discovery Site
In 1955 scientists Bernard Burke and Kenneth Franklin from the Carnegie Institution of Washington accidentally discovered naturally-generated radio waves from Jupiter using a 96-acre antenna array. The discovery led to greater understanding of . . . — Map (db m745) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Rowser’s Ford5,000 Confederate Cavalrymen Crossed — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 24, 1863, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, leaving 3,000 cavalrymen in Rectortown, Virginia, to monitor Federal activity, led three Confederate cavalry brigades to Haymarket. Encountering Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s corps marching north, Stuart sent . . . — Map (db m761) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca
John Garrett laid out a town called Newport here in 1797 and gave away lots as prizes in a lottery, but a town did not actually appear until after 1830, when the C&O Canal was completed from Georgetown to Seneca Creek. The town was called Seneca. A . . . — Map (db m764) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Seneca Store
In 1900, Frederick Allnutt purchased the 1855 Darby House and 1½ acres of land from Wilson Tschiffely, who had recently acquired the property along with the nearby mill. Allnutt, who had been running a store next to the canal for several years, . . . — Map (db m765) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — The Seneca Aqueduct
Canal engineers build aqueducts to bridge canal boats over rivers and large stream such as Seneca Creek. Eleven aqueducts were needed between here and the canal’s western terminus at Cumberland, Maryland; all required skilled quarrymen and . . . — Map (db m760) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Kemp Mill
A 1794 map of Maryland indicates a mill at this site owned by Quaker minister and political activist Evan Thomas. Thomas' Mill, leased to Thomas Brown in 1803, was sold to Aaron Dyer in 1816. Francis Valdenar purchased the frame saw and grist mill . . . — Map (db m332) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — The Silver Spring
The community of Silver Spring derives its name from a mica flecked sparkling spring which existed in the immediate area and is now commemorated in this park. Francis Preston Blair, who came to Maryland from Kentucky to publish a newspaper in . . . — Map (db m101) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Beltsville — Van Horn’s Tavern
On Vansville Hill, Prince George's County, Maryland. President George Washington stopped there on July 19, August 7, and September 12, 1795. — Map (db m355) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Bowie — Bowie Railroad Station Museum
The Baltimore and Potomac Railroad, chartered in 1853, inaugurated train service on July 2, 1872 with a line to Washington, and on January 1, 1873 opened the Pope's Creek line to southern Maryland. At the junction of the two lines the town of Bowie . . . — Map (db m646) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), College Park — Founders’ Gateway
(Right Tablet) Erected in honor of those through whose contributions was established The Maryland Agricultural College (list of names) (Left Tablet) The University of Maryland The Maryland Agricultural College was founded on this campus . . . — Map (db m167) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Tree
First Lady of the Land, First Lady of the World, wife of our 32nd President, First Chairman of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights. From this point she surveyed the site and spurred the work of building Greenbelt, the first garden community in the . . . — Map (db m188) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Community Center
The Greenbelt Community Center, originally the Greenbelt Center Elementary School and Community Building, was completed in the autumn of 1937, just in time for Greenbelt’s first occupants. From the beginning, residents also used the buildings for . . . — Map (db m2475) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Eleanor Roosevelt
First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt took a great interest in Greenbelt and visited the town on numerous occasions. Mrs. Roosevelt participated directly in extensive planning and development. She believed that decent housing and a nurturing environment for . . . — Map (db m2474) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Gas Station
A gas station has stood on this site since the opening of the town in 1937. Notice that the rounded glass facade is gone from the original building and that a garage has been added on the right side. Initially, like all the other businesses in . . . — Map (db m194) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Greenbelt Lake
Construction on the Greenbelt project began with this lake on October 12, 1935. Originally a heavily wooded 23-acre valley cut by a stream, the lake required one year and over two hundred men to complete it. Because the federal government was . . . — Map (db m173) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Methodist Preaching Place1776-1803
Bishop Francis Asbury, builder of Methodism in America, recorded nine visits to this place. The farm, called "Wild Cat," belonged to Shadrick Turner, planter. He and his wife Sarah, zealous laymen, hosted many meetings. Several United Methodist . . . — Map (db m122) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Roosevelt Center
Greenbelt's 1937 Roosevelt Center Mall is one of the first planned shopping areas in the country—a precursor to the modern shopping mall. Greenbelt's planners positioned the mall to be within easy and safe walking distance from all the town's . . . — Map (db m195) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Greenbelt — Swimming Pool
Progressive planners equipped Greenbelt with the kinds of outdoor athletic facilities that only rich people could afford during the Great Depression. Greenbelt’s original outdoor swimming pool opened on Memorial Day 1939. It was reportedly the only . . . — Map (db m2473) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — Calvert Family Cemetery
Burial place of George & Rosalie Calvert, four infant children and Charles Benedict Calvert and his infant son. The Calvert family, descendants of the Lords Baltimore, lived at "Riversdale" from 1803 to 1887. Charles Benedict Calvert was a major . . . — Map (db m123) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — From Plantation to Suburb; a Community Grows
Town of Riverdale Park. A key factor in the initial development of Riverdale Park in 1887 was its proximity to Washington, D.C. By the end of the 19th century, transportation between Riverdale Park and Washington was extremely convenient . . . — Map (db m984) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — Riverdale School
A holiday crowd gathered on this spot July 4, 1895, to celebrate the dedication of the first Riverdale School built by the Riverdale Park Company, developers of the new suburb of Riverdale Park. The two-room building, measuring 28 by 60 feet, had 12 . . . — Map (db m191) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — Riversdale
Site of the gates at the original entrance to Riversdale, or the Calvert Mansion. Built 1800–1803 by Baron Henri Joseph Stier of Belgium, as a wedding gift for his daughter Rosalie Eugenie who married George Calvert, June 11, 1799. — Map (db m975) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — This Demiculverin
Brought to Maryland in 1634 by the first colonists on the ships Ark and Dove, this demiculverin was presented to Charles Benedict Calvert of Riversdale in 1845. — Preservation and restoration was funded by the Maryland Heritage Committee of . . . — Map (db m187) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Riverdale — Welcome to RiversdaleThe Stier-Calvert Mansion, 1801–1807
In the summer of 1794, as French Republican troops approached Antwerp, Flemish aristocrat Henri Joseph Stier (1743–1821) and his family fled to Philadelphia, taking with them their most valuable possessions, including the finest collection of . . . — Map (db m189) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Upper Marlboro — Darnall’s Chance Burial Vault
An 18th century underground brick burial vault containing the remains of nine unidentified individuals was discovered in 1987 during an archaeological survey of the rear yard. Evidence suggests that the vault was built by James Wardrop, a . . . — Map (db m2432) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Upper Marlboro — This White Oak Tree
A direct descendent of the Wye Oak is planted in honor and recognition of his dedicated public service. Ernest A. Loveless Jr. Chief Judge, 7th Judicial Circuit. — Map (db m2433) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Charlotte Hall — Cadet Pierre A. Mourthé
In Memoriam. Cadet Pierre A. Mourthé, Class of 1919, Born September 6th 1897 at Pau, France, who met his death by accidental drowning August 24th, 1917. — Map (db m941) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Charlotte Hall — Coole Springs of Saint Marie’sCharlotte Hall, Maryland
Waters of exceptional purity and reputed healing quality led to the establishment near here of one of the earliest hospitals in the North American Colonies, authorized by the General Assembly, October 20, 1698. — Map (db m929) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — LeonardtownEstablished in 1660
Named Seymour Town in honor of Governor John Seymour and designated St. Mary’s county seat by the General Assembly in 1708. Name changed to Leonardtown by the General Assembly in 1728 in honor of Leonard Calvert, first colonial governor of Maryland. — Map (db m953) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — LeonardtownSpies, Intriguers and Blockade Runners
When the white citizens of St. Mary’s County voted here in the 1860 presidential election, John Breckenridge, the secessionist candidate who carried Maryland, got 920 votes. Abraham Lincoln received 9 percent of the popular Maryland vote; the . . . — Map (db m955) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — The Mural Story
The mural scene depicts various time periods in Leonardtown’s history. In general, the left side of the painting presents an older time period, around the turn of the century. As you move to the right, the chronology advances to a point in the . . . — Map (db m957) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — This Cannon
This cannon was brought to Maryland in 1634 on The Ark. Used in defense of St. Mary’s City and as a St. Inigoes Manor boundary marker. Presented to St. Mary’s County Historical Society by The Society of Jesus. (original inscription . . . — Map (db m956) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Lexington Park — Saint Nicholas Church
1637 Jesuit Mission of Father Andrew White was located a mile from here on Patuxent River, on land given by Mattapanient Indian Chief Macquacomen. The first St. Nicholas Church was built at this site in 1796 by Jesuit Father James Walton. Present . . . — Map (db m999) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin
War on the Chesapeake Bay Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to . . . — Map (db m1000) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout Confederate Cemetery
Erected by the United States to mark the burial place of Confederate Soldiers and Sailors who died at Point Lookout, Md., while prisoners of war and were there buried to the number of 3384, but whose remains were subsequently removed, either to . . . — Map (db m927) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout Confederate Cemetery
Erected by the State of Maryland in memory of the Confederate Soldiers who died Prisoners of War at Point Lookout, from March 1st, 1864, to June 30th, 1865. (north face) “At the call of Patriotism and duty they encountered the . . . — Map (db m943) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout Prisoner-Of-War Camp(1863–1865)
After the Battle of Gettysburg, the Union established a prisoner-of-war depot near here. Confederate soldiers and Maryland civilians were imprisoned and guarded by 400 Union troops. With only tents for protection, 3,384 prisoners died. — Map (db m998) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout State ParkHammond General Hospital
Hammond General Hospital, opened at Point Lookout, Maryland, in August 1862, was named for Surgeon General William A. Hammond. The massive structure, built to accommodate 1,400 amen, was set on piles about two to three feet above ground and . . . — Map (db m1001) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Inigoes — The Manor of Cornwaleys’ Cross
2000 acres granted Sept. 8th, 1639 to Thomas Cornwaleys who came to Maryland with “The Ark and The Dove.” He and Jerome Hawley were appointed “His Lordship’s Commissioners for the government of said Province” 1633 with . . . — Map (db m977) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — After the Disastrous Fire
Pro Deo. Pro Patria. This tablet erected in honor of Hon. Albert C. Ritchie, Governor of Maryland, members of the General Assembly 1924 and other public spirited citizens in recognition of their co-operation in restoring this historic . . . — Map (db m973) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Commemorating Maryland’s Pride and Glory“Freedom of Conscience”
In the early 1880s, Marylanders began to commemorate the “lost city” of St. Mary’s as a place of special significance. The 300th anniversary of Maryland’s founding in 1934 brought renewed attention and enthusiasm. The State House replica . . . — Map (db m959) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Entrance to First State House of Maryland
In memory of Nicholas Young of St. Mary’s Co. Maryland, elected to the House of Burgesses Nov 30, 1665. Boxwood dedicated June 13, 1932, and tablet placed through Maj. William Thomas Chapter, D.A.R. by Delia Harris Maddox, Ann Delia Power . . . — Map (db m1006) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — In 1648 Margaret Brent Asks for “Vote...And Voyce”
Margaret Brent (ca. 1601–1671), a Catholic gentlewoman, lived in Maryland from 1638 to 1650. In June 1647 the dying governor, Leonard Calvert, made her executrix of his estate with power to pay the soldiers he had hired to put down a . . . — Map (db m950) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — John Llewellyn
First register of the Colonial Land Office, Clerk of the Assembly 1682, Chief Clerk to the Secretary of the Province 1692, member of the committee signing protest against the removal of the Capital from St. Mary’s City to Annapolis 1694. His home . . . — Map (db m962) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Laura Maryland Carpenter BlinnMistress Margaret Brent
The National Society, Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America placed this tablet in honor of our National President 1952–1955 Laura Maryland Carpenter Blinn, born in St. Mary’s County and whose ancestors landed here with the Lord . . . — Map (db m951) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Leonard Calvert1610–1647
Lord of St. Michael’s, Trinity, and St. Gabriel’s Manors with Court Leet and Court Baron. First governor of Maryland 1634–1647. — Map (db m960) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Leonard Calvert
(west face) To the memory of Leonard Calvert, First Governor of Maryland this monument is erected by the State of Maryland. (north face) Leonard Calvert, second son of George Calvert, first Baron of Baltimore and Anne, his wife, . . . — Map (db m968) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Mattapany Street
The first road built by the colonists in Maryland. It led from “St. Marys” to “Mattapany” on the Patuxent River. Referred to in 1639 as the “Mattapany Path.” — Map (db m976) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — Saint Mary’s Female Seminary
Established by act of Assembly, 1839. A monument to the birth of the State, 1634. “Where the mothers of future generations may receive their education at a place so well calculated to inspire affection and attachment for their native . . . — Map (db m972) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — St. Mary’s CityCapital of Maryland, 1634–1694
Here, for the first time in America, men and women of differing faiths lived in peace and goodwill, practicing freedom of conscience, according to Lord Baltimore’s “Instructions to Colonists,” 1633. “Freemen Assembled,” of . . . — Map (db m961) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — St. Mary’s Female Seminary
The State’s 200th anniversary memorial established by Act of the Legislature of 1839 as a living monument to mark the birthplace of the State and of religious liberty. — Map (db m958) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — The First State House of Maryland
On this site was erected in 1676 the first State House of Maryland. Previous to this date the Assembly met in various places subsequent to the Planting of the Province at St. Mary’s City, March 27, 1634. The twelve stone markers forming a cross . . . — Map (db m967) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), St. Mary’s City — The Landing of the Ark and the Dove
(No inscription save the title. This marker tells its story pictorially.)Map (db m909) HM
New Jersey (Essex County), Newark — Penn Station Historic Site
Penn Station, designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White, opened in 1935 and is an outstanding example of Art Deco exterior and interior design. Penn Station replaced the Pennsylvania Railroad's old Market Street station which had . . . — Map (db m527) HM
New Jersey (Somerset County), Bound Brook — The Frelinghuysen Tavern
This tablet marks the site of The Frelinghuysen Tavern. Here Hendrick Harpending, a shoemaker from Holland, built his home circa 1720, which later became a tavern, owned by his son, Peter. Soon after the adoption of the Declaration of . . . — Map (db m523) HM
New York (Putnam County), Carmel — Parade Ground
Here Col. Henry Ludington of Dutchess County Militia drilled his regiment, and mustered them many times to march against the British. — Map (db m526) HM
New York (Putnam County), Carmel — Sibyl Ludington
Sibyl Ludington rode horseback over this road the night of April 26, 1777, to call out Colonel Luddington's regiment to repel the British at Danbury, Conn. — Map (db m525) HM
New York (Ulster County), Wallkill — Washington’s HeadquartersLiberty and Washington Streets, Newburgh — Historic New York
General Washington came to the farm home of the Hasbrouck family in Newburgh on April 1, 1782. He occupied the house until August 19, 1783, while his troops were encamped at Temple Hill, a few miles away. These were trying months while a peace . . . — Map (db m385) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — AlexandriaAlexandria in the Civil War
“Alexandria is ours,” declared Col. Orlando Wilcox of the 1st Michigan Vol. Inf. as his regiment captured the city on the morning of May 24, 1861. When Virginia's vote of secession became effective, Union forces immediately crossed the . . . — Map (db m159) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Gadsby’s Tavern
Erected 1792. Popular resort and famous hostelry of the Eighteenth Century. Here was held in 1798 the first celebration of Washington's Birthday in which he participated, and from its steps Washington held his last military review and gave his last . . . — Map (db m146) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-86 — Historic Alexandria
Alexandria was named for the family of John Alexander, a Virginia planter who in 1669 acquired the tract on which the town began. By 1732, the site was known as Hunting Creek Warehouse and in 1749 became Alexandria, thereafter a major 18th-century . . . — Map (db m47) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Panoramic View of AlexandriaMathew Brady – 1864
Camp of the 44th New York Volunteer Infantry, also known as the "Ellsworth Avengers" and the "People's Ellsworth Regiment." The unit was raised in honor of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth, who was killed at the Marshall House Hotel on May 24, 1861, . . . — Map (db m196) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Site of First Services of the Salvation Army
Alexandria, Virginia May 1885. On this site stood Captain Joseph Pugmire and three lassies who conducted the first Salvation Army services in Alexandria. Later, the Salvation Army was located at 319 and 316 King Street from 1922 to 1965, when it . . . — Map (db m143) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — The Carlyle House and the 18th-Century Site
The Carlyle House, completed in 1753, was the residence of one of the 18th-century Alexandria's leading citizens—John Carlyle—a prosperous merchant and landowner. 1. Although the earliest known engraving of the Carlyle House appeared . . . — Map (db m142) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — The George Washington Masonic National Memorial
Let prejudices and local interests yield to reason. Let us look at our national character and to things beyond the present period. —George Washington (Left Plaque) This classic sculpture commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the . . . — Map (db m198) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — The Ramsay House
Owned by William Ramsay, a founder of Alexandria in July, 1749, and first Mayor. Restored by the City of Alexandria in 1956 and dedicated to the memory of Mrs. Robert Miller Reese (Rebecca Ramsay) (1870–1955), great-great-granddaughter of . . . — Map (db m144) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Washington’s Town House
Replica of Washington's Town House. Lot purchased by George Washington 1763. House completed 1769 – torn down 1855. Rebuilt by Gov. and Mrs. Richard Barrett Lowe 1960. Bricks & stones from excavation used in construction. Worth Bailey, . . . — Map (db m147) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-40 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Seven miles south is Manassas, where Jackson, on his turning movement around Pope, destroyed vast quantities of supplies, August 26–27, 1862. Hill and Ewell of Jackson's force, coming from Manassas, reached Centreville on their way to . . . — Map (db m411) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-21 — Confederate Defenses
Here while the Confederate army camped at Centreville, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston built strong fortifications in the winter of 1861–1862. In Feb. 1862, President Jefferson Davis ordered Johnston to evacuate them and move his army closer to . . . — Map (db m412) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — Z-169 — Fairfax County / Prince William County
Fairfax County. Area 417 square miles. Formed in 1742 from Price William and Loudoun, and named for Lord Fairfax, Proprietor of the Northern Neck. Mount Vernon, George Washington's home, is in this county. Prince William County Area 345 . . . — Map (db m421) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-42 — First Battle of ManassasPanic at Cub Creek Bridge
In the afternoon of 21 July 1861, after Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's and Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard's Confederates defeated Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell's Union army, the bridge over Cub Run was jammed with retreating Federal soldiers as well as . . . — Map (db m413) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-22 — Second Battle of Manassas
Here Pope gathered his forces, August 30–31, 1862. From this point he detached troops to check Jackson at Ox Hill while the Union army retreated to the defenses at Alexandria. — Map (db m410) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-23 — The Stone Bridge
Originally built of native sandstone in 1825, the turnpike bridge over Bull Run became an important landmark in the Civil War battles at Manassas. Union Brig. Gen. Daniel Tyler's division feigned an attack on Col. Nathan G. Evans's brigade guarding . . . — Map (db m420) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Vibrant, But Segregated Community
In the aftermath of the Civil War, numerous former slaves came to Fredericksburg where there was already an established free black community. Many freedmen took work as laborers and servants. Others brought artisan skills they had practiced in . . . — Map (db m733) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site)
In 1886, the African Baptist Church, on Sophia Street, sustained serious flood damage. The congregation purchased a new site on higher ground, but a clouded deed delayed construction. In the interim, approximately half of the members decided to . . . — Map (db m732) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Harry J. Parrish
Harry J. Parrish—The Man. Harry Jacob Parrish was born February 22, 1922 and has made Manassas his lifelong home. He attended Prince William county schools, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Wofford college, and schools of the US Air Force. . . . — Map (db m702) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Site of Manassas Junction
One mile west was the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroad lines. The point became known as Manassas Junction. During the Civil War both sides used the area as a supply base. The site of the first depot was probably about . . . — Map (db m700) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“On to Richmond!”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2464) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasJackson’s Daring Raid
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2465) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasThe Curious Descend on Manassas for Curios
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2466) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“The Sickness is Upon Us”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2467) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasConfederates Withdraw to Richmond
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2468) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — “The Unfinished Railroad”
These cuts and fills are what remain of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The Independent Line was constructed in the mid-1850s to connect Gainesville, 5 miles to the west, with Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. After completing the . . . — Map (db m658) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battlefield of Bull Run or First Manassas
July 21, 1861. Confederates under General Beauregard defeated Federals under General McDowell. General Jackson given name of “Stonewall” on this field. Generals Bee and Bartow killed. Old stone house used as hospital. This marker erected . . . — Map (db m840) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow
Born Savannah Georgia, Sept. 16, 1816 Mortally wounded on this spot, July 21, 1861 Commanded 7th, 8th, 9th & 11th Georgia & 1st Kentucky Regiments The first Confederate officer to give his life on the field. — Map (db m593) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Charge on Griffin’s GunsRaw Recruits: The 33rd Va. Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
The Virginians were waiting, tense, here at the wood’s edge—their first time under bombardment. Shells from Ricketts’ battery exploded in the boughs overhead and plowed up the ground in front. When the two Union cannon rolled into position on . . . — Map (db m895) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Church During WartimeFirst Battle of Manassas
People were on their way to worship—some already in the church yard—when thousands of Federal soldiers suddenly appeared marching south Sudley Road. Within minutes the sound of gunfire came from the direction of Matthews Hill. As wounded . . . — Map (db m878) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Counterattack — First Battle of Manassas
Dead cannoneers lay in rows between their cannon, dead horses along the back slope; the Union guns were immobilized yet still a magnet for both armies. Up this slope marched the 14th Brooklyn, resplendent in Zouave uniforms. They managed to . . . — Map (db m896) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fighting in TwilightThe Hatch-Hood Collision — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Two - August 29, 1862
Officers said the Rebels were retreating. Hatch’s Division was ordered to pursue. Marching double-quick west on the turnpike, the Federals reached this hill just after sundown. Suddenly the ridge erupted with fire. In the . . . — Map (db m873) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-34 — First Battle of Manassas
Henry Hill lies just to the south. Here the Confederates repulsed the repeated attacks of the Union army under McDowell. July 21, 1861. Here Jackson won the name “Stonewall” and from here began McDowell’s retreat that ended at Washington. — Map (db m596) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-44 — First Battle of Manassas
On the Matthews Hill, just to the north, the Confederates repulsed the attack of the Unionists, coming from the north, in the forenoon of July 21, 1861. The Union forces, reinforced, drove the Confederates to the Henry Hill, just to the south. There . . . — Map (db m602) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — General Barnard Elliott Bee
General Barnard Elliott Bee of South Carolina Commander, Third Brigade Army of the Shenandoah was killed here July 21, 1861 Just before his death to rally his scattered troops he gave this command “Form. form. There stands Jackson like a . . . — Map (db m540) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-15 — Henry House
These are the grounds of the Henry House, where occurred the main action of the First Battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, and the closing scene of the Second Battle of Manassas, August 30, 1862. — Map (db m600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Invaded Farmland — First Battle of Manassas
The morning of the battle was hot and still. Except for a few details the scene mirrored today's pastoral landscape. Fields lay fallow, overgrown with tall grass. Around the Henry House grew rose bushes and a small peach orchard. . . . — Map (db m879) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — OutnumberedThe Stand in Robinson’s Lane — First Battle of Manassas
Shot-up Confederate regiments stumbled past, in retreat from Matthews Hill. First along Warrenton Pike, then in Robinson’s Lane, Col. Wade Hampton’s South Carolinians tried to delay the Union advance. Slowly, with volley after volley of musket fire, . . . — Map (db m899) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Point-Blank VolleyAn Officer’s Error? — First Battle of Manassas
In clear view of artillerymen here, Confederates lined up at the fence and trees across the open field. The two cannon and supporting infantry could have stopped the Rebels cold, yet the four hundred charging Virginians were able to fire a musket . . . — Map (db m881) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Re-Burying the DeadGroveton Confederate Cemetery
Of the 266 soldiers buried here, only two are fully identified. • Heavy fire often kept either side from claiming the dead, and after both battles the armies had to maneuver quickly. Some of the wounded lay for days in the blistering sun. • After . . . — Map (db m408) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Stone House – Battlefield Landmark
This building links today’s landscape to the battlefield scene. The roadbeds have not changed; thousands of soldiers noticed the Stone House as they marched through this strategic intersection. During both battles Federals turned the former . . . — Map (db m846) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — The Fight for Rickett’s Guns — First Battle of Manassas
Shells were exploding overhead as Ricketts’ men dueled Stonewall Jackson’s artillery, directly across the field. Sharpshooters’ bullets thumped into the wooden limber chests. On the rear slope horses were screaming, dying. Suddenly from the far . . . — Map (db m897) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Thomas Jonathan Jackson
(Front Face): Thomas Jonathan Jackson 1824 1863 (Right Face): First Battle of Manassas July 21, 1861. (Left Face): There Stands Jackson Like a Stonewall (Rear Face): ** Erected by ** The State of Virginia Under . . . — Map (db m541) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Wartime Manassas“Fortifications of Immense Strength”
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2463) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Washington (Louisiana) Artillery Battalion — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 2:00 p.m. Army of the Potomac (Beauregard), CSA Washington (Louisiana) Artillery Battalion Maj. John B. Walton Three 6-pounder Smoothbores Two 6-pounder Rifled Guns. “We advanced by hand to the front until finally the . . . — Map (db m805) HM
Virginia (Warren County), Front Royal — J-9 — Execution of Mosby’s Men
On 23 Sept. 1864 in a fight south of town, some of Lt. Col. John S. Mosby’s Rangers mortally wounded Lt. Charles McMaster, 2nd U. S. Cavalry, after he allegedly surrendered. Union Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert’s cavalrymen retaliated by executing six . . . — Map (db m2447) HM
Virginia (Warren County), Front Royal — Front RoyalCrossroads of War
During the Civil War, Front Royal, a “cross-roads town” of fewer than 600 residents, was the economic center of Warren County. One soldier described the town as “...quite rural. The principal objects of interest are two small . . . — Map (db m2436) HM
Virginia (Warren County), Front Royal — Front RoyalBattle of Front Royal — 1862 Valley Campaign
On May 23, 1862, Front Royal was occupied by 1000 Federal troops (1st Maryland Infantry, 29th Pennsylvania and a battery of Knap’s Artillery) under the command of Col. J. R. Kenley In the early afternoon Confederate Gen. T. J. . . . — Map (db m2439) HM
Virginia (Warren County), Front Royal — J-11 — Guard Hill Engagement
In Aug. 1864, part of Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard H. Anderson’s corps threatened the left of Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s army. As Brig. Gen. Wesley Merritt’s division approached on 15 Aug. to protect the Federal flank. Anderson ordered . . . — Map (db m2449) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Col. Morgan Morgan
Nov. 1, 1688 — Nov. 17, 1766. Erected by the State of West Virginia. In commemoration of the first settlement within the present boundaries of said State, which was made by Col. Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, and Catherine Garretson, . . . — Map (db m1169) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan Morgan
Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, established his home at Bunker Hill before 1732, and was leader in Eastern Panhandle’s early development. His sons gave name to Morgantown, and fought in Indian and Revolutionary Wars. — Map (db m1176) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Darkesville — Darkesville
Named for Gen. William Darke, veteran of the Revolution and the Indian wars. He saves the remnants of St. Clair’s army from massacre in 1791 when badly defeated by the Miami Indians. His son Capt. Joseph Darke, lost his life. — Map (db m1979) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — “Oh Shenandoah, I Long to See You!”
“Big Apple Time Capsule” • Dedicated: Oct 19, 1990 – Re-open in year of 2040 • Sponsor: Martinsburg Jaycees. This “community pride project” is an attempt to preserve the Apple Capital city and surrounding areas of . . . — Map (db m1212) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Avenue of Flags Monument
The colonial village of Martinsburg was established by law enacted by the General Assemply of the Commonwealth of Virginia on October 21, 1778. Martinsburg’s founder was General Adam Stephen, a noted soldier of the American Revolutionary War. . . . — Map (db m1978) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Shop Complex
The roundhouse is the sole surviving cast-iron framed roundhouse and is an important example of mid-19th century industrial building design. Designed by Albert Fink, in collaboration with Benjamin H. Latrobe, it represents an early use of . . . — Map (db m1199) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m1975) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — J. R. Clifford
Born 1848 in Hardy Co. A Civil War vet., Storer College graduate, teacher and principal at local Sumner School. Published Pioneer Press (1882), first African American paper in state. First of race to pass state bar exam (1887); argued two . . . — Map (db m1210) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg / Berkeley Riflemen
Martinsburg. Established, 1778, by Gen. Adam Stephen. Named for Col. Thomas Martin, nephew of Lord Fairfax. Home of Admiral C.K. Stribling and Admiral Charles Boarman. In Jackson’s raid, 1861, captured B&O locomotives were drawn by horses to . . . — Map (db m1976) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg RoundhouseJackson and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad — Antietam Campaign
In April 1861, as the Civil War erupted, Confederate forces seized the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Harpers Ferry west. On May 24, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston ordered Col. Thomas J. (later “Stonewall”) Jackson to destroy the rolling . . . — Map (db m1200) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Old Federal Building
125 S. Maple Avenue. Completed 1895. Constructed using the Richardson-Romanesque Style of architecture, this building served as a Post Office and United States Courthouse. — Map (db m1977) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Roundhouses and Shops / Railroad Strike of 1877
Roundhouses and Shops. The B&O Railroad reached Martinsburg in 1842, and by 1849, a roundhouse and shops were built. These first buildings were burned by Confederate troops in 1862. The present west roundhouse and the two shops were built . . . — Map (db m1197) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Sumner-Ramer Memorial School515 West Martin Street
The present building was completed in 1917 under the leadership of Fred R. Ramer. He was the first principal in Berkeley County to have a school named after him. Ramer school served the black community until 1964. — Map (db m1211) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — World War Memorial
1917-1918. This memorial is dedicated as an enduring tribute to the patriotism of the citizens of Berkeley County who rendered loyal service to our country in the great World War, and to honor the memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice . . . — Map (db m1256) WM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — 1983 — Cedar Lawn
1½ mi. S is 1825 home of John T. A. Washington, a great nephew of the 1st president. Land part of “Harewood” plot of Sam’l Washington, a brother of George. Original site of 1780 home “Berry Hill.” — Map (db m1912) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Colonel Charles Washington
Exitus Acta Probat. 1738–1799. In Memory of Colonel Charles Washington, brother of General George Washington and founder of Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1786. The four corner lots at Washington and George Streets were . . . — Map (db m2029) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Harewood
Erected in 1771. The home of Colonel Samuel Washington, County Lieutenant. His brother General George Washington visited here and General Lafayette and Luis Phillipe of France were entertained here. In this house James Madison and Dolly Payne Todd . . . — Map (db m1914) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Jefferson County CourthouseWhere John Brown Was Tried
In this courthouse, John Brown, the abolitionist, was tried and found guilty of treason, conspiracy and murder. He was hanged four blocks from here on December 2, 1859. • Visitors are Welcome. — Map (db m1742) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Richwood Hall
The original brick house was built on land owned by Lawrence Augustine Washington, the son of Samuel Washington, George’s brother. The present mansion-house, in an excellent state of preservation, was built about 1825. During the battle of Cameron’s . . . — Map (db m1885) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Ranson — The Right Reverend Ernest Eugene Baltimore
1912–1999. A distinguished clergyman, humanitarian, and civic leader in the community. Bishop Baltimore served as Senior Bishop & General President of the King’s Apostle Holiness Church of God, Inc. He was Pastor of The Baltimore Temple . . . — Map (db m2030) HM

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