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Thomas Viaduct Obelisk image, Touch for more information
By Tom Fuchs, February 25, 2006
Thomas Viaduct Obelisk
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — “The Narrows”
One of the most picturesque spots around Cumberland, discovered by Spendelow after the road over Wills Mountain had been constructed by General Braddock. Adopted as the route of the Cumberland Road (The National Road) 1833. The old stone bridge . . . — Map (db m4927) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Site of Bridge 1834
Built by Thomas Fealy Lieut. Jno. Pickell U.S. Engineer H. M. Pettit Ass’t Supd’t. — Map (db m4928) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The NarrowsAn Easier Route for the National Road
At first, the National Road climbed west from Cumberland up and over Haystack Mountain. In the 1830s, when the road was rebuilt, a new route was chosen. It would be a mile longer but the grade was substantially decreased so that horse teams could . . . — Map (db m4926) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The National Road(Called The Cumberland Road)
Was the first of the internal improvements undertaken by the U.S. Government. Surveys were authorized in 1806 over the route of “Braddock’s Road,” which followed “Nemacolin’s Path,” an Indian trail, over which George . . . — Map (db m444) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Washington’s Road
By order of Colonel Bouquet, George Washington’s troops opened this road from Fort Cumberland to Reas-town (Bedford, Pa.) during July 1758. Bouquet and Washington conferred half way between these places July 30, 1758. — Map (db m6106) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Flintstone — Martins MountainSunday Drivers and “Tin-Can Tourists"
The National Road enjoyed a revival from about 1910-1960, with the rising popularity of the automobile. Tourist travel began in earnest when cars became reliable enough for the average person to take a long trip. “Waysiders,” people who . . . — Map (db m4922) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — Blazing Braddock's Road
“We this day passed the ‘Aligany’ Mountain (Big Savage Mountain) which is a rocky ascent of more than two miles, in many places extremely steep…” Captain Robert Orme, June 15, 1755 British General Edward Braddock led a . . . — Map (db m5013) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — Martin’s Plantation
General Braddock's 2nd camp on the march to Fort Duquesne June 14th, 15th, 1755. The old Braddock Road passed to the southeast of the National Road from Clarysville to the "Shades of Death" near "Two Mile Run." The National Road was begun by the . . . — Map (db m440) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), La Vale — “Spendelow Camp”Also Called “Camp at the Grove”
General Braddock’s 1st camp on the march from Fort Cumberland to Fort Duquesne, June 11th to 13th, 1855. After building a road over Wills Mountain, Spendelow, an engineer, discovered a route by “The Narrows” and Braddock’s Run and a . . . — Map (db m2083) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), La Vale — The La Vale Toll House
Toll houses were built along the National Road as a result of a 25 year national debate as to whether or not the federal government should be responsible for funding road improvements. While there was agreement on the idea that those who used the . . . — Map (db m443) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Mount Savage — Mount Savage Iron Works1839
In 1844, the first iron rails made in the United States were produced on this spot by the Mount Savage Iron Works. Erected in 1839, the iron works contributed extensviely to the development of the Mount Savage Community. — Map (db m5846) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Asbury United Methodist Church
Site of the oldest and most prominent African American congregation in Annapolis, MD. In 1803, seven free African Americans bought the land and established the First African Methodist Episcopal Church. It was closed in 1832 in a local reaction to . . . — Map (db m6191) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Lafayette’s EncampmentMarch – April 1781
During the Revolutionary War, 1200 Continental Light Infantrymen under the command of Marquis de Lafayette encamped on the rise behind this sign en route to the decisive battle in Yorktown, Va. They arrived in Annapolis from Head of Elk by a . . . — Map (db m2907) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — On this site on November 25, 1960
On this site on November 25, 1960, the Annapolis citizens listed below held a "Sit-in" demonstration at the Terminal Restaurant to claim the right of all citizens to receive service. They acted as representatives of the local African American . . . — Map (db m6189) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Site of the Annapolis City Gates1698-1790
All roads leading to this provincial capital, marked AA to guide the traveler, entered the city here beside the city gate house. A wooden fence, enclosing the city, kept out wandering cattle and "men of ill fame." Erected by the National Society of . . . — Map (db m6190) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — This Cannon was Brought from England
By the first settlers March 25, 1634 Mounted on the walls of the fort at Old St. Mary's Recovered from the St. Mary's River 1822 Presented to the state in 1840 by Rev. Joseph Carbery This tablet is placed by The Peggy Stewart Tea-Party . . . — Map (db m6192) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Twin OaksFrederick Douglass Summer Home
Designed by Frederick Douglass so that "As a free man I could look back across the bay to the land where I was born a slave". Built by Charles Remond Douglass. 1895 — Map (db m6173) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Crownsville — Belvoir(Scott’s Plantation)
French troops under Count de Rochambeau made their 36th camp here September 16-17, 1781, enroute to Yorktown, Virginia. Most of the troops embarked from Annapolis, but the artillary marched to Georgetown to cross the Potomac River. — Map (db m2928) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Friendship — Holly Hill
Surveyed, 1663, as Holland’s Hills for Francis Holland; bought 1665, by Richard Harrison, Quaker planter and shipowner, who owned about 6,000 acres. The house, built in three stages between 1665 and 1733 by Richard Harrison and his son Samuel, is . . . — Map (db m2938) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Harwood — “Larkins Hills”Patented 1663
Charles Lord Baltimore and his council attended the meeting of the Assembly here Oct. 2 – Nov. 6, 1663. 31 towns and ports of entry were established at this session in the several counties along the bay. Practically none of these towns exist . . . — Map (db m2945) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Harwood — William Penn
Came here to the home of Col. Thomas Tailler on “the ridge” December 13, 1682 for his first conference with Charles Lord Baltimore as to the location of the boundary line between Maryland and Pennsylvania. — Map (db m3042) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Portland Manor
Surveyed Dec. 6, 1667. Portland Landing and Saint Jerome’s surveyed 1700. Owned by Col. Henry Darnall, brother-in-law of Charles, 3rd Lord Baltimore and Secretary of State. — Map (db m3142) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Saint James’ ChurchOld Herring Creek Parish
The first church on this site was built, 1695, and the present structure was completed 1765. The Reverend Henry Hall (1675–1722) served as the first rector, 1698-1722. From 1786–1792 Saint James’ was the home parish of Thomas John . . . — Map (db m3143) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Millersville — Charles W. Baldwin Hall
Constructed 1861 Relocated 1895 Enlarged 1935 * Relocated to this site 2 June 1981 Rededicated 21 May 1983 By the Severn Cross Roads Foundation — Map (db m6188) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Millersville — The Severn Crossroads Church
Built as a Methodist Church in 1861 and used as the Church Sanctuary & Sunday School for fifty years. Moved in 1896 from SE to NE corner of General’s Highway and Indian Landing roads, and dedicated in 1935 to Charles W. Baldwin, its pastor for 71 . . . — Map (db m2884) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), West River — Old Quaker Burying Ground1672
Here April, 1672, George Fox, founder of Quakerism, opened the first General Meeting of Friends in Maryland, marking the beginning of West River Yearly Meeting and its successor, Baltimore Yearly Meeting of Friends. Site of West River Quaker Meeting . . . — Map (db m3038) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), West River — William Penn
Visited his Quaker friend William Richardson near this spot after the conference at Col. Thomas Tailler’s December 13, 1682. Lord Baltimore and the members of his Council accompanied him to this place. — Map (db m3039) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Admiral Guillermo Brown
In honor to the abiding memory of The father of the Argentine Navy Admiral Guillermo Brown On the banks of the Delaware where he started his maritime career. "Brave in combat, magnanimous in victory and audacious in his decisions" Born in 1777 in . . . — Map (db m6158) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot Trail"Keep back ... or I Shoot"
Baltimore - A House Divided On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the . . . — Map (db m6151) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Has been designated a National Historic Landmark. This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America. — Map (db m5787) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Beehler Umbrella Factory
On this site, from 1886-1908, stood the Beehler Umbrella Factory, the oldest umbrella house in America. Founded in Baltimore by Francis Beehler in 1828. — Map (db m4895) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Brown’s Arcade
Named for the governor who developed it, Brown's Arcade is a unique and early example of adaptive reuse in Baltimore. The four buildings that make up the Arcade were originally constructed as rowhouses in the 1820's. After the Great Fire of 1904, . . . — Map (db m5565) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Building Atop the Burying Ground
When leaders of First Presbyterian Church decided to build an new church atop their 18th-century burying ground, they hoped to serve Baltimore’s growing west end and protect their burial place from being diverted to other uses. Construction . . . — Map (db m2413) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Chimney Corner Building
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Chimney Corner Building 1812 A.D. — Map (db m6130) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Edgar Allan Poe House
“The little house in the lowly street with the lovely name.” This was how Edgar Allan Poe described 203 Amity Street, where he lived from 1832 to 1835 with his grandmother, aunt, and cousin Virginia, whom he married in 1836. While . . . — Map (db m2506) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Ellicott Flour Mills
The Ellicott Driveway portion of the Gwynns Falls trail follows the route of a millrace that carried water to a flour-milling complex owned by the Ellicott family. In the 1800s, 26 gristmills along the Gwynns Falls and other on the Jones Falls and . . . — Map (db m5533) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Enoch Pratt Free Library
In 1882, the merchant Enoch Pratt, wishing to make a gift to his adopted city which would benefit all of her citizens, gave Baltimore $1,058,000 to establish a public library. The original building fronted on Mulberry Street. Designed by the . . . — Map (db m5561) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Federal HillBuilding the Fort
On the evening of May 13, 1861, U.S. General Benjamin E. Butler’s troops occupied Federal Hill and brought their guns to bear on Baltimore. For the next four years the hill, garrisoned by 10 different regiments, served as a strategic Union strong . . . — Map (db m2560) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — First Unitarian Church
. . . — Map (db m5643) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — George Washington Bicentennial Marker
This elm has watched the growth of "Baltimore Towne" for over 100 years, on former estate of John Eager Howard, Revolutionary and 1812 Officer and fifth governor of Maryland. Here, in "Howard's Woods", Count De Rochambeau's troops camped, 1782, . . . — Map (db m5563) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Grace and St. Peter's Church
Built for Grace Church in 1852, this was one of the first Gothic Revival churches in the South to use Connecticut brownstone. St. Peter's Church, founded in 1802, and Grace Church, founded in 1850, were united in 1912. This union is symbolized by . . . — Map (db m6013) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Gwynns Falls ValleyFrom Work to Play
As the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike twisted and turned westward, it passed one of the centers of early city industry. A three mile long millrace on the Gwynns Falls provided power for over twenty mills that sawed wood, ground flour, wove . . . — Map (db m4940) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — H. L. Mencken House
Henry Louis Mencken was born on Lexington Street on September 12, 1880. His father hoped his eldest son would continue the family cigar manufacturing business, but after his father's death in 1899, Mencken headed straight for the Baltimore . . . — Map (db m5035) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Hackerman House
Built in 1850, Hackerman House, formerly the Thomas-Jencks-Gladding Mansino, was given to the City of Baltimore by Willard and Lillian Hackerman in 1984 and conveyed to the Walters Art Museum by the Honorable William Donald Schaefer in 1985. . . . — Map (db m6019) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Henry August Rowland House
. . . — Map (db m6003) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — IrvingtonThe Last Stop before Baltimore
Before Irvington existed, eastbound travelers encountered the last hill on the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike. The turnpike was part of the system of roads that connected to the National Road in Cumberland in 1806. During the 1800s, this . . . — Map (db m4941) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — James Cardinal Gibbons
At this site, on July 23, 1834, was born America’s first Prince of the Church, James Cardinal Gibbons. Although world-renowned for the influence and profoundness of his thought he was always the parish priest striving for the salvation of . . . — Map (db m2703) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — John Eager Howard
This park and sculpture commemorates Revolutionary War hero, benefactor and statesman John Eager Howard. Howard entered the Revolutionary Army at age 24, and soon gained military fame for his skillful and heroic use of the bayonet in the Battle of . . . — Map (db m5985) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — John H. B. Latrobe House
On an evening in October, 1833, three of Baltimore's most discerning gentlemen were gathered around a table in the back parlor of this house. Fortified with “some old wine and some good cigars,” John Pendleton Kennedy, James H. Miller . . . — Map (db m4939) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mother Seton House
This house, built around 1807, was the home of Saint Elizabeth Bayley Seton, the first American-born canonized saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Born in New York to a prominent Protestant family, Elizabeth Ann Bayley married William M. Seton . . . — Map (db m5986) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Murnaghan House
Built in 1849, this house was the home of William T. Walters (1819-1894) and his son Henry Walters (1848-1931), successful Baltimore merchants and bankers and avid collectors of art. At his death, Henry Walters bequeathed this building, his . . . — Map (db m6020) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Old Post Office
This structure, designed by James A. Wetmore and completed in 1932, is the second post office to occupy this site. Erected at a cost of $3.3 million, the neo-classical building, with its marble halls and paneled court-rooms, contained the most . . . — Map (db m6160) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — On This Location
On this location, from the stage of the Holliday Street Theatre, The Star Spangled Banner, written by Francis Scott Key, was rendered for the first time publicly November 12, 1814. — Map (db m2707) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Railroads Eclipse a National Road“Thus will scientific power conquer space.”
For several decades in the early 1800s, thousands of Conestoga Wagons, “ships of inland commerce,” ruled the National Road. With their sloping bodies, wheels taller than a man and six-horse teams skillfully maneuvered with a single . . . — Map (db m5705) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Rowhouses: a Baltimore Tradition
In Baltimore's early years, the Gwynns Falls lay beyond the city's settled area. During the 19th century, rapid population growth pushed the boundaries westward by annexing new areas in the valley and then beyond. Through the years of expansion, the . . . — Map (db m4944) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Samuel Shoemaker House
This imposing townhouse, built in 1853, was the home of Samuel Shoemaker, organizer of the Adams Express Company. The company that began in 1840 with one man and a satchel grew into a Goliath in the next few decades, serving every state and . . . — Map (db m6015) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — St. Ignatius Church
St. Ignatius Church opened August 15, 1856. Designed by Henry Hamilton Pittar and Louis L. Long, it was the second unit to be completed in the block-long complex that stretches from Madison to Monument Streets. In 1855, the porticoed central section . . . — Map (db m6125) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — St. Vincent de Paul Church
St. Vincent de Paul Church is the oldest Catholic parish church in the city. The church was built in 1840-1841 to accommodate the growing Irish Catholic population east of the Jones Falls. Its gleaming white Georgian tower has long been recognized . . . — Map (db m2600) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The American Psychoanalytic Association
The American Psychoanalytic Association was founded at this site on May 9, 1911 by James J. Putnam, M.D., President; Ernest Jones, M.D., Secretary, and Drs. Trigant Burrow, Ralph C. Hamill, John T. MacCurdy, Adolf Meyer, G. Lane Taneyhill and G. . . . — Map (db m6018) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Baltimore & Frederick-Town TurnpikeA Transportation Revolution started here
Maryland toll roads helped revolutionize American travel. The Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike began with a tollgate, placed near this corner in 1807. For a few cents, you could head west on a “smooth” road that was the ancestor of . . . — Map (db m5700) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Belvedere
Host to the mighty, famous, and infamous, the Belvedere Hotel has welcomed a steady stream of celebrities since it opened in 1903. Rudolph Valentino, Sarah Berhardt, Al Jolson, and Mark Twain are only a few of the notables who have swept through the . . . — Map (db m6017) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Citizens of Irvington
As a lasting expression of their gratitude and affection, have placed this tablet as a testimonial to the young men of this community, who, in a spirit of unselfish patriotism, volunteered at their countrys call, in the cause of democracy. . . . — Map (db m5531) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The First Unitarian Church of Baltimore
(Unitarian and Universalist) Founded as the First Independent Church of Baltimore Maximilian Godefroy, Architect, 1817 — Map (db m5645) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Great Baltimore Fire
On Sunday morning, February 7, 1904, a spark ignited blankets and cotton goods in the firm of John E. Hurst and Company, which stood between Hopkins Place and Liberty on the south side of German (now Redwood) Street. Flames leapt out of control from . . . — Map (db m6154) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Latrobe Building
1912 The Latrobe Building 1984 The Latrobe building was designed by Edward H. Glidden, a prominent Baltimore architect. The Latrobe name commemorates John Hazlehurst Boneval Latrobe, a respected attorney whose home formerly stood on this site. . . . — Map (db m6014) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m5703) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Oblate Sisters of ProvidenceJuly 2, 1829
At this site, 610 George Street, under the leadership of foundress, Mother Mary Lange, four women took vows of consecrated chastity, evangelical poverty, and religious obedience. Thus began the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Congregation of . . . — Map (db m5559) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Peabody Library
In 1857, George Peabody’s founding letter dedicated the Peabody Institute to the citizens of Baltimore in appreciation for their “kindness and hospitality.” The Massachusetts-born philanthropist eventually moved to London where he built . . . — Map (db m2410) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Port of BaltimoreThe National Road begins and ends here
Moving Goods Since 1729, Baltimore has owed its existence to its deepwater port. The city looks east to the Chesapeake Bay and ports around the world. It also looks west with access to markets in America’s heartland. It began with local farmers . . . — Map (db m6140) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Thomas Wildey Monument
Thomas Widley, born January 15, 1782. Thomas Widley, died October 19, 1861. He who realizes that the true mission of man on earth is to rise above the level of individual influence and to recognize the fatherhood of God overall and the . . . — Map (db m2429) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Tyson House
Built by Elisha Tyson 1790 — Map (db m6120) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — USS ConstellationFlagship of the Anti-Slave Trade
Though the Civil War was a period of great innovation for the navy, with widespread use of steam power and the innovation of ironclads there was still a place in the fleet for sailing ships. Built at the Gosport yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, in . . . — Map (db m6153) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — War Memorial
Rededicated on November 10, 2005, by Mayor Martin O’Malley, to honor and remember all our veterans who fought so valiantly for the United States of America—“The Land of the free and the home of the brave.” Time will not dim the . . . — Map (db m2702) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — William H. Welch House
. . . — Map (db m6016) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Baldwin — “The Eagle’s Nest”
Part of the Valley of Jehosaphat, now Dulaney Valley, patented August 10, 1684. Walter Dulaney acquired half, 1747, and remainder, 1767. His lands were confiscated and sold at the end of the Revolutionary War. Thomas Marsh obtained “The . . . — Map (db m2081) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Castle Thunder
A gift from Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Castle Thunder, the home of Richard and Mary Carroll Caton, stood on this site from 1787 to 1906. The 7-mile Frederick Turnpike stone marker of 1804 was moved here from its original position 3/10 mile . . . — Map (db m4910) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — CatonsvilleA Turnpike Town
This 1877 “Plan of Catonsville” lays outs all the possibilities of an energetic and emerging suburb of Baltimore, only eight miles, or a one-day carriage ride, to the east. The centerpiece of the town is the Frederick Turnpike, part of . . . — Map (db m5500) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — CatonsvilleFrom Stagecoaches to Horseless Carriages
The reign of stagecoaches and Conestoga Wagons on the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike only lasted seventy years. Omnibuses, attached to teams of four horses, began rolling out from Baltimore to Catonsville in 1862. The Catonsville Short . . . — Map (db m5536) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — OellaConquering the “Nine Mile Hill"
The Ellicott brothers constructed what became the first leg of the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike to get their flour to market in Baltimore. By 1787, they cut a new road east through the forests to shorten the trip to the city. This route . . . — Map (db m5741) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Rolling Road
A colonial road built for the purpose of rolling hogsheads of tobacco from the plantations to Elk Ridge Landing for shipment to England. — Map (db m2131) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — The Streetcar Era in Catonsville1880-1963
For over 100 years, streetcars graced the streets of Baltimore and the heavily traveled #8 line to Catonsville was one of the most popular. This line swung north from Frederick Rd. and plunged into the woods for a brief run to its terminus at . . . — Map (db m5534) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Cockeysville — Hayfields
Colonel Nicholas Merryman Bosley, builder, 1810, awarded silver tankard “by the hand of Lafayette” for best cultivated Maryland farm, 1824. Also home of John Merryman, early importer, 1848, of registered Hereford cattle, still, 1967, . . . — Map (db m2280) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Elicott City — The George Ellicott House
This house was built in 1789 by George Ellicott, a Quaker, who was a miller, surveyor, merchant and astronomer. He was friend and advisor to America's first black man of science, Benjamin Banneker, who visited here. He also entertained Chief Little . . . — Map (db m193) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Ellicott City — Ellicott’s Mills
Established 1772 by the three Ellicott brothers from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. They opened the road from here to Baltimore. The B. and O. R. R. was completed to this point May 20, 1830. — Map (db m175) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Pikesville — The Old United States Arsenal
Built in 1816 after the close of the War of 1812 as an arsenal. Removed to a point of safety beyond Baltimore. Used during the War between the States and later as a Confederate Home. Now the property of the State of Maryland (1935). — Map (db m2322) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Relay — The Thomas Viaduct
Front Commenced, July 4th, 1833. Finished, July 4th, 1835. Rear Johnathan Knight, Chief Engineer Caspar W. Wever, Superintendent of Construction. Designed by Benjamin H. Latrobe. . . . — Map (db m127) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Mt. Airy — Parrsville & RidgevilleTwo Towns at the Four Corners
Here at Milestone 31, about 130 feet southeast of its original location, the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike created two towns as it moved west. Both Parrsville and Ridgeville are now a part of Mount Airy. Parrsville, to the east, was named . . . — Map (db m4933) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Sykesville — Hood’s Mill
Near here the Confederate cavalry of Major General J. E. B. Stuart entered Carroll County from Cooksville about daybreak June 29, 1863. After damaging the tracks and bridge of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Sykesville, they marched to . . . — Map (db m3025) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — Richards Oak
General Lafayette and his army camped arount this tree April 12, 1781. A Civil War cavalry unit later occupied the site. The oak, over 500 years old was owned by the Thomas Richards family for over a century. A huge limb fell August 1964, splitting . . . — Map (db m1758) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Rose Hill
Home of General Thomas Marsh Forman (1758–1845), Aide to General William Alexander, known as Lord Stirling, and a representative in the General Assembly, 1790 and 1800. He served with Major George Armistead, Fort McHenry, 1814. A later owner, . . . — Map (db m1697) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Wilna
Boyhood home of William Whann Mackall. Appointed to the U. S. Military Academy in 1834, resigned from the U. S. Army. Joined the confederacy and served on the staffs of Generals Albert Sydney Johnson, Braxton Bragg and Joseph E. Johnston. General . . . — Map (db m1735) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Faulkner — "Huckleberry"
Home of Confederate Mail Agent, Thomas A. Jones, who helped to shelter, and aided the escape of John Wilkes Booth and David Herold in their flight, April 16th to 21st 1865. — Map (db m4528) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — “Cliffton”
On this location Maj. R. G. Watson and his daughter Mary, both Confederate agents, lived and carried on a direct mail and slave route between the North and the South during the entire Civil War. Because of the unobstructed view from these cliffs, . . . — Map (db m5938) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Cliffton
The home of Major Roderick G. Watson is two miles north of this marker. At the start of the Civil War many persons crossed the Potomac River to Virginia in this area. From 1862 to the end of the war, Thomas A. Jones served as a Confederate agent . . . — Map (db m3827) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — The Retreat
Daniel St. Thomas Jenifer’s home. First President of the Maryland Senate 1777-1781. Close friend of George Washington who visited here June 3rd 1763. — Map (db m1235) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Bucktown — Harriet Tubman1820-1913
The "Moses of her People", Harriett Tubman of the Bucktown District found freedom for herself and some three hundred other slaves whom she led north. In the Civil War she served the Union army as a nurse, scout and spy. — Map (db m3956) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — “Appleby”
The home of Governor Thomas Holliday Hicks. Born 1798. Died 1866. Governor of Maryland 1858-62. U.S. Senator 1862-65. — Map (db m3961) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — “Stanley Institute”
Oldest community-owned one-room schoolhouse still intact in Dorchester County. First constructed c. 1865 near Church Creek. Moved here in 1867, it was used continuously until July 15, 1966, as Rock Elementary School for students in grades 1 through . . . — Map (db m3968) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — Civil War Hospital SiteHenry Shoemaker House
Civil War Hospital Site The Henry Shoemaker House was used as a hospital site during the Maryland Campaign 1862. Private Property courtesy of S.H.A.F — Map (db m4953) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — General Edward Braddock
General Edward Braddock traveled over this road in April 1755 (in a coach and six horses purchased from Gov. Horatio Sharpe of Maryland)after a protracted conference in Frederick with Benjamin Franklin and others concerning the securing of teams, . . . — Map (db m1247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jug BridgeAn engineering marvel for early America
In 1800, travelers expected to ford rivers or use ferries that were slow and often risky in bad weather. The Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike Company, building the first leg of the National Road in 1805, set out to revolutionize American roads. . . . — Map (db m2321) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Richfield“The Boy General of the Golden Lock”
It was here that George Armstrong Custer was first introduced as a general to the troops he would command. The first order signed by Gen. George G. Meade as the newly appointed commander of the Army of the Potomac on June 28, 1863 promoted three . . . — Map (db m1539) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — 8 West Main StreetCirca 1800
The dwelling located here at #8 West Main Street is significant as an early 19th century vernacular log building that was modified in the ca. 1930's with the application of a simulated Flemish bond brick veneer facade. It reflects the development of . . . — Map (db m5299) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Appleman's Tannery
From 1790 to 1862, Philip Appleman (1755-1830) and his son John (1793-1862) operated a tannery and harness shop on the land that included this property and the four properties to your right, and extended back to South Street (now Washington Street). . . . — Map (db m5312) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Clovinger HouseCirca 1800
Presumably built by Philip Clovinger, 10 West Main began as a one-story log dwelling constructed in the early 1800's. In 1821 Thomas Powell, described as Middletown's first blacksmith, acquired the property and improved the building for commercial . . . — Map (db m5300) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Reno Monument
Two miles to the southwest stands the monument to Major General Jesse L. Reno who was mortally wounded at the close of the fighting for Fox’s Gap in the Battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862. — Map (db m5412) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Woodmere
This is the entrance to the 133.45 acre John Routzahn farm, established in 1866, known as Woodmere and located on the north and south sides of the Old National Pike. The brick manor house at 400 East Main Street was the original farm house built by . . . — Map (db m5311) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m5923) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5922) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m5921) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — Mile Stones of the old National Pike
Looking more like an ancient tombstone, the stone marker at the bottom of the hill before you, tucked inside the guardrail, was once used to denote mileage to Baltimore along the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, also known as the old National . . . — Map (db m5404) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketRoads to Gettysburg
Gettysburg Campaign Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North less than a year after the Antietam Campaign. On Monday, June 29, the Federal corps marched north . . . — Map (db m4008) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketA New Town for a New Road
As Fredericktown was born in 1745, German farmers were already hauling their grain to the port of Baltimore. By the 1780s, new communities were springing up along busy wagon routes. Two speculators, Nicholas Hall and William Plummer, competed to . . . — Map (db m5746) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New Market in the Civil War
This area was patrolled by Confederate troops under the command of Gen. Fitz Hugh Lee at the time of General Robert E. Lee's invasion of Maryland in September 1862. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and his Confederate cavalry escaping from Union forces passed . . . — Map (db m4016) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Deer Park — Cleveland Cottage
President Grover Cleveland and his bride, the former Frances Folsom, arrived here the day following their White House wedding on June 2, 1886. They spent their honeymoon at this Deer Park Hotel cottage. — Map (db m470) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Deer Park — Deer Park Hotel
Built by the B&O Railroad, opened July 4, 1873 and operated until 1929. Razed 1942. This was one of the most exclusive mountain resorts in the east. Many nationally prominent people, including four United States Presidents, were guests here. — Map (db m5413) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Negro MountainThe Highest Point on the National Road
You have reached the highest point on the National Road. Here, in the far western mountains of Maryland is the backbone of eastern America. In 1817, the National Road construction crew took on the challenge of crossing this tough terrain by laying a . . . — Map (db m5409) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Stanton’s Mill
In 1797, Thomas Stanton conveyed water rights to Jesse Tomlinson, and Tomlinson built the first grist mill on the site of Col. Dunbar's 1755 hospital encampment. The mill was prime reason for settlement in this area. In addition to being an . . . — Map (db m438) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Abingdon — “Constant Friendship”
Acquired 1761 by Colonel Thomas White (1704–1779). Largest colonial landowner in this part of Maryland. Deputy Surveyor-General of Baltimore (then including Harford) County. Father of Bishop William White, first presiding Bishop of the . . . — Map (db m1281) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Abingdon — “The Bush Declaration”Harford Town
County Seat of Harford County from its origin March 1774, until March, 1783. Here the first Declaration of Independence ever adopted by an organized body of men duly elected by the people was proclaimed on March 22, 1775. — Map (db m1246) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Abingdon — Old Post Road: Cokesbury College
Old Post Road Established 1666. The first Methodist college in the world established at Abingdon June 5, 1785 by Bishops Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury. Destroyed by fire December 4, 1796, located 175 yards east of this point. — Map (db m1233) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Abingdon — This Tablet
This tablet marks the site of the building in which were held the Courts of Harford County from its organization in March 1774 until March 1783. In this house the Committee of Harford County held its meetings before and during the early years of . . . — Map (db m1251) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Belcamp — Sophia’s Dairy(Probably Sophia’s Dowry)
Left by Captain Hall of Cranberry in 1737 to his daughter Sophia, who married Colonel Thomas White, father of Bishop William White of Philadelphia, Mrs. Robert Morris and Sophia, who married Aquilla Hall. He built this house in 1768, one of the . . . — Map (db m1261) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Concord Point LighthouseHavre de Grace, Md.
Erected at the mouth of the Susquehanna River in 1827, it is the oldest lighthouse in continuous operation in the United States. Now under automatic control, it was manned by the O’Neill Family until 1928. John O’Neill was named as the first . . . — Map (db m1485) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Havre de GraceWar of 1812
Here on the morning of May 3, 1813, British Forces under Admiral Cockburn landed, sacked, and burned the town. The principal defenses were two small batteries on Concord Point. The “Potato Battery” on high ground was manned to the last . . . — Map (db m1273) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Joppatowne — Rumsey Mansion
The colonial home of Benjamin Rumsey, influential landowner and member of the First Continental Congress. Erected in 1720-24 with bricks imported from England. It remains an outstanding example of Colonial Georgian architecture. — Map (db m1231) HM
Maryland (Harford County), White Hall — Black Horse Tavern
George Washington stayed here the night of June 5, 1773 on his way back to Mt. Vernon from Columbia College, New York, where he had left his step-son Jackie Custis. — Map (db m1408) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elk Ridge Landing
An important colonial port for shipment of Tobacco. Here in 1765 Zachariah Hood, Maryland’s “Stamp Act” agent, was hanged in effigy. Lafayette’s troops camped here April 17-18, 1781 on the way to engage Cornwallis in Virginia. George . . . — Map (db m3144) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elk Ridge Landing
An important colonial port for shipment of Tobacco. Here in 1765 Zachariah Hood, Maryland’s “Stamp Act” agent, was hanged in effigy. Lafayette’s troops camped here April 17-18, 1781 on the way to engage Cornwallis in Virginia. George . . . — Map (db m3145) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elkridge Furnace Inn"Neighborhood Parlor" for Healing
On May 5, 1861, U.S. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler occupied Relay, Maryland, with the 8th New York and 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments and Cook's Boston Battery of light artillery. Their mission was to prevent Confederate sympathizers from sabotaging . . . — Map (db m5876) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Site of Roadsend Gardens
Home of Spencer Heath (1876-1963), inventory of variable pitch airplane propeller, noted engineer, lawyer, author, and horticulturist. — Map (db m5869) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Decatur DorseyCivil War Hero
Howard County native Decatur Dorsey was one of only sixteen African American soldiers to received the Medal of Honor for courage under fire during the Civil War. Sgt. Dorsey, of Company B, 39th United States Colored Troops, earned his medal at the . . . — Map (db m5756) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Road Versus RailsThe Rivalry Begins
Ellicott City’s Main Street is the National Pike, part of the road system that moved Americans west. Only two decades after the road was constructed, a new transportation rival appeared. In 1831, America’s first railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio, . . . — Map (db m720) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — St. John’s Episcopal Church
A chapel of ease of Queen Caroline parish, established 1728. Incorporated by Maryland General Assembly, 1822. Consecrated 1823 by Bishop James Kemp. Original land, “Dorsey’s Heaven,” deeded to church by Caleb and Elizabeth Dorsey. . . . — Map (db m3341) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — The National Road
This marker stands on a part of the right of way of the historic and fabled National, or Cumberland Road. Commencing in 1806 it was built in segments by city, state, federal, and private means and was the first great commercial and travel link from . . . — Map (db m131) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Lisbon — New LisbonServicing Travelers on the National Pike
“New Lisbon” was established by Quaker Caleb Pancoast in 1802, who saw both need and opportunity to service travelers along the length of the National Pike. He also welcomed all religious denominations into his home, and allowed it to be . . . — Map (db m5744) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Poplar Springs — Poplar Springs"From Drovers to Drivers"
In the early 1800s, as settlers spread west from the Chesapeake Bay, the farming community of Poplar Springs grew up around the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, part of the system of roads making up the National Road. An endless parade of . . . — Map (db m5024) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Poplar Springs — Simpson & Mount Gregory United Methodist ChurchesCreating a Unified Community of Strength
Methodist churches were a source and inspiration for the budding African-American community as people moved westward along the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, part of the National Road system. Both enslaved and free African-Americans . . . — Map (db m5745) HM
Maryland (Howard County), West Friendship — Moving Goods on the National Road
“Open a wide door, and make a smooth way for the produce of that Country to pass to our Markets.” George Washington, 1784 America’s founders looked west for the future success of the new country. The United States needed . . . — Map (db m5742) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Worrell’s Tavern
Site of the tavern where George Washington dined and lodged on his return from Philadelphia, March 23, 1791, while he was President of the United States of America. Originally erected 1932 by Chester Lodge 115 A. F. & A. M. — Map (db m3068) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Rock Hall — Wickliffe
Major Joseph Wickes, who settled on Eastern Neck Island c. 1658, was Chief Justice of Kent County. Before 1674 the Court met at Wickliffe, his home here (no longer standing). By 1680 he had acquired 864 acres, the southern half of the island, which . . . — Map (db m3076) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Washington's Farm
519 acres owned 1794-1799 by the First President Thomas Sprigg, Jr., patented in 1725 as "Woodstock" 1,102 acres here, inherited in 1782 by Sprigg's three granddaughters, Sophia, Rebecca, and Elizabeth. Sophia married John Francis Mercer (later . . . — Map (db m5098) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — The Clara Barton House
Early headquarters of the American Red Cross and home of Clara Barton, founder and First President, who lived here until her death in 1912. Located just south of this marker, the house had an unusual interior of Steamboat Gothic design with railed . . . — Map (db m303) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Beltsville — Brown’s Tavern
This plaque and garden commemorate the site of Brown’s Tavern, a Prince George’s County Historic Site that served travelers on the former Baltimore-Washington turnpike from the early 1830’s to the early 1990’s. It was constructed and owned by the . . . — Map (db m2983) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Beltsville — Site of Rhodes’ Tavern
Lieutenant-General George Washington “dined at Rhodes” December 18, 1798, on his last journey from Philadelphia to Mount Vernon. — Map (db m2982) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Thrift School1884-1909
One of the oldest surviving one-room schoolhouses in Prince George’s County, Thrift School was built in 1884. It replaced an earlier school from 1869 located on the same site. The School Commissioners, having acquired the one-acre tract from the . . . — Map (db m6084) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — Stagwell
Patented to Thomas Stagwell 1649. Acquired by Richard Bennett 1706, one of the largest land owners in Maryland. His descendant Judge Richard Bennett Carmichael built the house about 1805. He presided over the convention of 1867, for a new . . . — Map (db m3134) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Site of Goldsborough HouseCirca 1798
By that year, a 2-story brick house, measuring 40 by 24 feet and described as “not yet fully complete,” was built on a 4-acre lot of “Chesterfield,” deeded in 1792 from Mary Nicholson to her daughter Henrietta. Henritta’s . . . — Map (db m3109) HM
Maryland (Somerset County), Westover — Coventry Parish Church
Erected 1784 - 1792 Placed on the National Register of Historic Places 9 August 1984 Ruins stabilized 1985 - 1990 under the auspices of Rehobeth Ruritan Club Maryland Historical Trust Somerset County Historical Trust B. J. . . . — Map (db m3881) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Easton — The “Mannour of Ratcliffe”
800 acres patented January 17, 1659 to Robert Morris of London, mariner, “together with a Court Baron and all things thereunto belonging by the laws and customs of England.” One of the earliest grants on the Eastern Shore. — Map (db m3181) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Trappe — “Compton”
← Patented 1664 to James Elvard. Acquired by William Stevens before 1700. His grandson Samuel Stevens, Jr. member of Legislature 1808 to 1820. Governor of Maryland 1822 to 1825. During his administration Jews were enfranchised. When Lafayette . . . — Map (db m3333) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Roxbury Mills Bridge
This bridge was built in 1824, in close proximity to Roxbury Mills, an early sawmill and later a large distillery complex which operated into the 20th century. A three-arch bridge over the Antietam, it was one of a series of bridges built for the . . . — Map (db m5036) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Fort Mills
← One of the four stockade forts erected in 1756 along the North Mount Road as supports for Fort Frederick in preventing the Indians from descending upon the inhabitants living in the Cumberland Valley. — Map (db m5930) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — The Federal Signal Station
near this point was captured Oct. 10, 1862 by a detachment of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry. On clear days this station could communicate with stations on South Mountain which relayed messages via Catoctin Mt. to Sugar Loaf Mt. to Washington, D.C. — Map (db m5588) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Springs — Wilson’s StoreStore of Three Wonders
"You wonder if we have it. We wonder where it is. You wonder how we found it!” That is how Janice Keefer remembered her father’s store during the 42 years that Dorsey Martin conducted business here. Originally opened by Rufus Wilson in 1850, . . . — Map (db m4932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Conococheague — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5925) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Baltimore StreetFunkstown’s Link to the Chesapeake
When the National Road was completed through Funkstown in 1823, a rush of “stagecoaches and wagon teams, droves of cattle, teamsters and travelers” flooded through the town. Although Baltimore was seventy miles to the east, the Funkstown . . . — Map (db m2007) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Battle of FunkstownAt Bay another Day — Gettysburg Campaign
The Confederate presence at Funkstown threatened any Union advance against Gen. Robert E. Lee’s position near Williamsport and the Potomac River as he retreated to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, posted at . . . — Map (db m1158) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Building the Funkstown Bridge
“The turnpike bridge at Funkstown is the only one...which seems to belong to a town” —Helen Ashe Hays, The Antietam and its Bridges This bridge, finished in 1823, is perhaps the oldest one over Antietam Creek. . . . — Map (db m2010) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Claggett’s Millrace Bridge
Although it vaults only a millrace deflected from Antietam Creek proper, this small but well-designed one-arch bridge is typical of many others that have not survived at mill sites in the county. It is not certain that John Weaver built this 53' . . . — Map (db m5669) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Claggett's Mill Bridge
This three-arch bridge over Antietam Creek was completed by John Weaver in 1840 for $2,800. It was near the mill operated for generations by the Claggett family. The house, barn, and outbuildings of the Claggett estate, "Valentia," stand nearby. . . . — Map (db m5031) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Funkstown Bridge No. 2
This bridge over Antietam Creek at Funkstown was built in 1833 by George Weaver for $1,800. At this site was Shafer’s Mill where flour was ground. The most notable feature of this bridge is the graduated size of its three arches, growing larger from . . . — Map (db m2009) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Keller Home
Used to treat Confederate officer H.D. McDaniel 11th GA. Regt. during the battle of Funkstown July 10, 1863, who suffered a severe wound and was brought to this house. He survived to later become governor of Georgia. — Map (db m2006) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Rose's Mill Bridge
This handsome three-arch bridge over Antietam Creek was constructed by John Weaver in 1839 and was specially adapted to the grain mill which was built at the same time. The westernmost of the three arches was designed to accommodate the millrace . . . — Map (db m4930) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Antietam Battlefield
12 miles to Antietam National Battlefield Site, where on Sept. 17, 1862, about 41,000 Confederates under the command of General Robert E. Lee were pitted against 87,000 Federals under General George B. McClellan. — Map (db m1965) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Corporal William Othello Wilson
United States Army Medal of Honor Recipient and Buffalo Soldier William Othello Wilson, a native of Hagerstown, Maryland, enlisted in the U.S. Army on August 21, 1889, at age 22 in St. Paul, Minnesota. He was subsequently assigned to the . . . — Map (db m5755) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Crossroads of HistoryRoute 40 & 11 Cross At This Point
In the court house that stood on this site Confederate Gen. John McCausland was given $20,000 in cash and all of the suits, hats, shoes, boots, shirts and socks that could be found as ransom upon his threat to burn Hagerstown in July of 1864. . . . — Map (db m1934) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jonathan Hager HouseCirca 1740
October 16, 1739, Jonathan Hager took up “Hager’s Fancy” 200 acres in the valley of Antietam Creek. A year later he married Elizabeth Kershner for whom Elizabeth-Town (Hagerstown) was named and established his home here. In 1944 it was . . . — Map (db m1157) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Mason and Dixon Line100th Mile Stone
Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary line. Surveyed and marked 1763-68 by two English astronomers, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon. This is one of the "Crown" stones, set every five miles displaying the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore on south and Penns . . . — Map (db m6107) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Harmon Hotel
The Harmon Hotel stood here, one of more than 40 properties owned by Walter Harmon (1869-1915), a local African-American businessman who amassed a fortune in real estate. A McGaheysville, VA native, Harmon had 10 children and 20 grandchildren. Most . . . — Map (db m5675) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County Courthouse
This is Washington County's third courthouse. When the county was established in 1776, the first courthouse, a combination building that served also as a market house, was built in the middle of the town square, one block east of here. It proved too . . . — Map (db m6094) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County JailFugitive Slaves Detained at the County Jail
An African American Heritage Report prepared by the Heritage Resources Group for the City of Hagerstown in 2002 identified the following historical incidents which suggest that the Washington County Jail was a significant site of activity along the . . . — Map (db m5676) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County Jail
The first building used as the Washington Country Jail was a log house at 26-28 E. Franklin Street in Hagerstown. In 1818, the state legislature authorized the county to spend $12,000 to build a new jail. The new jail was built on this site on . . . — Map (db m5677) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockThe Busiest Village on the Road
“After the exhilaration of a gallop down the mountain without breaks, what appetite would not be set on edge, what refinement of palate displeased by venison cutlets, or even ham and eggs?” Harper’s Magazine, 1879 By . . . — Map (db m5931) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock's Orchard Industry
Hancock and its surrounding area during the main span of the 20th century was one of the largest fruit producers in the nation. In 1886 Edmund Pendleton Cohill began the cultivation of fruit crops. Over the years his planted acreage increased, and . . . — Map (db m5933) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Major James Breathed"Hardest artillery fighter the war produced"
Maj. James Breathed was born near present-day Berkeley Spring, W. Va., on December 15, 1838, and moved while young with his family to Washington Co., Md. He attended St. James School in Lydia, where his father John Breathed was headmaster. At age . . . — Map (db m5932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — National Pike Toll HouseCirca 1822
The significance of this structure lies both in its history and architecture. It is one of the few remaining “toll houses” along the old National Road. The National Road was chartered between Hancock and Cumberland in 1819 and completed . . . — Map (db m5799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Felfoot Bridge
Built in 1854 by George Burgan for $1,550, this bridge spans Little Antietam Creek and stands on "Felfoot" a tract of land originally surveyed in 1734 and patented to Thomas Swearingen in 1737. An unusual feature of this bridge is the squared . . . — Map (db m4929) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Hess’s Mill Bridge
This two-arch bridge was built by John Weaver in 1832. It is unique in that one arch is so much larger than the other. The smaller arch may have accommodated the millrace which was located on that side of the Little Antietam and served the mill that . . . — Map (db m2003) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Hitt Bridge
This three-arch span with its unusually high center arch was built in 1830 over a ford in the Antietam Creek that was used by Braddock's army in 1755. Samuel Hitt was instrumental in financing this bridge, which was built by Silas Harry, as agent . . . — Map (db m3201) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — Pry’s Mill Bridge
This two-arch bridge was built over the Little Antietam Creek by George Burgan for $1,650 in 1858. Its cutwaters, the upstream pier bulwarks designed to divide the current and break up ice flows and log jams, are unique in that they are shaped like . . . — Map (db m2004) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’ Crossroads
This crossing served during July 10-15, 1863, as an anchor for the flanks of such gathering Federal forces as the Reserve Artillery and the Second, Third, and Twelfth Corps. Minor skirmishes with elements of Lee's besieged Army of Northern Virginia . . . — Map (db m1989) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans Crossroads — Council of WarShould We Attack?
Gen. George G. Meade gathered his generals near here at his “Antietam Bridge” headquarters on the evening of July 12, 1863, to decide whether to assault the Confederate defenses near Williamsport protecting Gen. Robert E. Lee’s escape . . . — Map (db m1982) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), St. Clairsville — Home of Benjamin Lundy
. . . — Map (db m4955) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), St. Clairsville — Milestone Marks where Extension of National Road...
Milestone marks where extension of National Road west of Ohio River was started July 4, 1825. Stone relocated 1964 — Map (db m5027) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — “S” Bridge
Old National Road, Built about 1828. Where the road crossed a creek at an angle, a stone arch bridge was built as right angles to the stream flow. "S" shaped walls were then built to guide traffic around the job from the direction of travel across . . . — Map (db m284) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Salesville — “S” Bridge
Old National Road, Built about 1828. Where the road crossed a creek at an angle, a stone arch bridge was built as right angles to the stream flow. "S" shaped walls were then built to guide traffic around the job from the direction of travel across . . . — Map (db m286) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Washington — Morgan’s Raiders
Morgan's Raiders were here overtaken and defeated by Union cavalry under Gen. Shackelford, July 24, 1863. A memorial to the fortitude and patriotism of our fathers and mothers. — Map (db m4956) HM
Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Oakmont — Camp D. D. Gaillard
15th U.S. Engineers. World War Volunteers. Enlisted at Pittsburgh. Trained here May 23, 1917 to July 8, 1917. Embarked from New York July 9, 1917. England July 19, 1917, to July 23, 1917. First Armed foreign troops to land in England since Sixteenth . . . — Map (db m137) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Brownsville — Brashear House
John A. Brashear, astronomer, educator, was born here 1840. His grandfather kept the Brashear House, a leading tavern. In 1825 Lafayette spoke from its doorway to the people of Brownsville. — Map (db m746) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Uniontown — Underground Railroad
The path to freedom led this way for slaves fleeing the South in the years before the Civil War. Here, they were given haven and helped along their journey by local people, through one of the key stations on the Underground Railroad, in a house on . . . — Map (db m1115) HM
Pennsylvania (Somerset County), Addison — Great Crossings
About one half mile above this point is the "Great Crossings" of the Youghiogheny River, where George Washington crossed November 18th, 1753, when sent as envoy by Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia to the French Commandant at Fort Le Boeuf. Washington, . . . — Map (db m351) HM
Pennsylvania (Somerset County), Addison — Toll House
One of the six original toll houses on the Cumberland or National Road is on the hill opposite. Built after the road was turned over to the State in 1835 by the U.S.   Restored and preserved by the D.A.R. — Map (db m350) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Beallsville — 10 — Madonna of the Trail
(South Face) N.S.D.A.R. Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days. (East Face) On this historic spot, the hunting ground of the friendly Indian Nemacolin, this monument is erected and dedicated to the memory of our pioneer . . . — Map (db m501) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Claysville — “S” Bridge
This stone bridge was part of the National, or Cumberland Road. Originated in 1805, it was completed to Wheeling in 1818. Over it passed countless wagons and stages uniting the East and the growing West. — Map (db m806) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Richeyville — Centerville
Beallsville - 4 Centerville Central stopping point between Washington and Uniontown for stagecoaches. Founded 1821 — Map (db m5017) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Scenery Hill — Hill’s Tavern
This tavern, in continuous operation since 1794 when it was opened by Stephen Hill, is one of the oldest on the National Road. It was a popular stop for stage coaches and waggoners. — Map (db m255) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Washington — Gantz Oil Well
Site of first oil well in Washington County. Oil was struck in Dec., 1884. First oil was shipped in 1885; last oil was pumped about 1916. This well led to the development of the Washington oil field. — Map (db m819) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Washington — LeMoyne House
Built, 1812, by Dr. John LeMoyne. For many years, home of his son Dr. Francis LeMoyne, noted abolitionist, and builder of first crematory in U.S. Now the home of the Washington County Historical Society. — Map (db m262) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Washington — Wolff’s Fort
A stockaded house built here about 1780 by Jacob Wolfe afforded a refuge for the settlers of this region. It was one of the most important forts in the area. — Map (db m817) HM

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