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Confederate Hospital - Facing North image, Touch for more information
By R.E. Smith, August 29, 2007
Confederate Hospital - Facing North
Florida (Pinellas County), Saint Petersburg — St. Mary, Our Lady of Grace Church — Established 1908 — Oldest Catholic Church in the City of St. Petersburg
Initially served by the Jesuits from Sacred Heart in Tampa, a small wood-frame chapel named “St. Mary” was built at the northwest corner of Sixth Street and Fifth Avenue South in 1908. By 1913, a new and larger brick church was . . . — Map (db m40486) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — Machinery From The C.S.S. Nashville
These portions of rotating machinery were removed, in 1960, from the wreck of the Confederate blockade runner Nashville, sunk in the Ogeechee River by shell fire from the U.S.S. Montauk in Feb. 1863. These relics give some conception . . . — Map (db m16105) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 25-19 — Sherman's March To The Sea : — Battle of Shaw's Bridge and Shaw's Dam
Beginning on December 10, 1864, Union and Confederate soldiers fought near here at Shaw’s Bridge and Shaw’s Dam, as Union General William T. Sherman’s army moved toward Savannah. During bloody fighting, Confederates twice repulsed Union attempts to . . . — Map (db m4949) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 89 — North Carolina Railroad
Company shops built here in 1857 for maintenance and repair of the N.C. Railroad. Closed in 1866. — Map (db m43304) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Zebulon Baird Vance
. . . — Map (db m32044) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Boone Memorial — This Memorial Erected To — Daniel Boone | Squire and Sarah Boone
Daniel Boone Hunter, Explorer Backwoodsman, Soldir Surveyor Roadbuilder Legislator, Magistrate He lived and learned woodcraft in Davie County 1750-65

Squire and Sarah Boone Parents of Daniel Boone Pioneers of the Yadkin whose . . . — Map (db m53211) HM

North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-47 — Boone Tract
In 1753 Lord Granville granted 640 acres on Bear Creek to Squire Boone who sold it in 1759 to his son Daniel. This was a part of the original Boone tract. — Map (db m53197) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-3 — Daniel Boone's Parents
Squire and Sarah Boone are buried here. Daniel Boone, 1734-1820, lived many years in this region. — Map (db m53190) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Davie County in the Civil War — Stoneman in Mocksville — Stoneman's Raid
(Preface): On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m53207) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — H. Andrew Lagle — A Half-Century of Service
Employee and Town Supervisor Volunteer. Fireman and Fire Chief. His extensive knowledge, expertise, and resourcefulness - His dedication and compelling sense of duty ably served the citizens of Mocksville. — Map (db m54052) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-33 — Hinton R. Helper
Author of The Impending Crisis, a bitterly controversial book which denounced slavery; U.S. Consul at Buenos Aires, 1861-66. Born 150 yds. N. — Map (db m53186) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — The Boone Family in Davie County
On 04 October 1750, Squire Boone received a Land Warrant and Survey for a 640-acre tract "lying...upon Grant's Creek, alias Lickon (Licking) Creek" in present Davie County. He received a grant for this 640 acres on the present Elisha and Dutchman . . . — Map (db m53219) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Arcadia — George Washington Stopped Here
In 1709 George Washington stopped here at an inn where these stones were in use ——— D.A.R. 1930 — Map (db m54392) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania — Founded 12 June 1759
First planned Moravian Village in N. Carolina. Colonial and antebellum trade and agricultural center. Only remaining continuous, independent Wachovia Settlement. Contains unique remnants of original medieval style plan where families lived in a . . . — Map (db m52627) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania Freedman's Community
The community established along this road in the Bethania Town Lot was built by African-American men and women who began acquiring land here following the Civil War. Many of these people had been enslaved on the Oak Grove plantation, from which they . . . — Map (db m52538) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Cedar Grove School
One room school that was used to educate African American children from approximately 1915 to the late 1940s. Grades 1 through 7 were all taught in one room with as many as 50 children and "one small library of 20 books over in the corner". First . . . — Map (db m52541) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — J-69 — Great Wagon Road
Frontier road from Pennsylvania to Georgia in 18th century. A major avenue for settlers of the N.C. backcountry. Passed near here. — Map (db m52532) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Lord Cornwallis
Occupied Bethania during American Revolution, 9 February 1781, with 2,000 soldiers after crossing the Shallowford on the Yadkin while pursuing patriots whom Daniel Morgan led to victory over a portion of the British army under Banastre Tarleton at . . . — Map (db m52626) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Oak Grove School
Oak Grove School was constructed ca. 1910 and served nearby African-American children from ca. 1910-1950. Tradition maintains that Oak Grove's construction was made possible through the donation of the site by a local African-American family, the . . . — Map (db m52577) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — J-23 — Plank Road
The western terminus of the Fayetteville and Western Plank Road, 129 miles in length, longest in North Carolina, built 1849-1854, was here. — Map (db m52530) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — J-66 — McKnight's Meeting House
Est. by Methodists ca. 1782. Annual Conferences held here in 1789, 1790, & 1791 by Bishop Asbury. Site was 400 yards N.W. — Map (db m51878) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — The "Hattie Butner"
A nine passenger Concord stagecoach built in 1872 for Edwin T. Clemmons by the Abbot-Downing Co. of Concord, New Hampshire. Named for his wife Harriet (Hattie) Butner. A gift to the people of Clemmons by the Wachovia Historical Society in 1993 and . . . — Map (db m54285) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — William Johnson
William Johnson Built a fort of huge logs at this place about 1757 to protect his family and neighbors from attack by the Indians Erected by his Descendants 1956 — Map (db m54396) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — William Linville — (c. 1711-1766) — Militia Captain and "Long Hunter"
First frontier explorer and settler of Tanglewood lands along the Great Wagon Road running from PA to GA. Born in Chester and raised in Conestoga, PA. Married Eleanor Bryan and moved to Shenandoah Valley, VA (on Linville Creek) by 1733, serving as . . . — Map (db m54413) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Kernersville — Kerner Tannery
300 yards Northwest of this marker, near the creek branch, stood a tannery begun by John Frederick and Philip Kerner, two sons of Joseph Kerner for who the town was named. During the War between the States (1861-1865) the tannery was operated by . . . — Map (db m54129) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Kernersville — Railroad Street Mural
In the early 1870's, the citizens of the Town of Kernersville literally brought the Railroad to and through Kernersville by contributing the physical labor to construct over four miles of track, thereby bringing commerce to the Town and raising the . . . — Map (db m54134) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Kernersville — Stuart Motor Company
Est. 1926 by Ned R. & Annabel Stuart The Bldg. was originally opened as Kernersville's First Auto Showroom and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Due to the many Hats Ned Stuart wore serving the town it was used as: The . . . — Map (db m54131) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Charles L. Spaugh House — ca. 1900
Charles L. Spaugh, a Christian and civic leader in Lewisville, built this large two-story house with lumber from his own sawmill, for his wife Dora Alspaugh Spaugh and their family. Jesse Joel Jones, Sr. and his wife Annie Shermer Jones purchased . . . — Map (db m53007) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Concord United Methodist Church
Founded in 1782. Called Waggoner's Chapel by Bishop Asbury. Present sanctuary built in 1908. Oldest Methodist congregation in Forsyth County, according to Methodists in assembly. — Map (db m53025) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — George Mock House
George Mock (1847-1925) built this house in the 1870s and brought his bride, Adeline Shouse, here. The structure of the house had not changed until their son, Marvin Mock (1881-1961), built rooms to the east. — Map (db m53018) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Great Philadelphia Wagon Road — ca. 1754
The Great Wagon Road passed 120 feet north of this marker.The Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia to Augusta was the premier 18th century backcountry road from Pennsylvania to Georgia. From about two miles north of Bethabara it was cut to . . . — Map (db m52921) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Jones Grocery Store — 1875
Joseph Spurgeon Jones (1845-1928) built the original store that at the time was in the Little Yadkin Township, a part of Yadkin County. In 1914, his son, Will A. Jones (1871-1940), moved the store across the road east of its present location. After . . . — Map (db m51888) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewis C. Laugenour House — ca. 1860
Built by Lewis Case Laugenour, early community benefactor, for whom Lewisville is named. Architecturally one of the best examples of the Greek Revival Style in Forsyth County. — Map (db m53010) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewisville Baptist Church — Established 1881 — Lewisville's First Organized Baptist Church
Lewisville Baptist Church was established in 1881. In 1882 on this highest knoll in the Lewisville village, a 40'x60' wooden building with double doors and a stately steeple was built. Following destruction by lightning in 1936, it was replaced with . . . — Map (db m53022) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewisville Roller Mill — 1910
Built by the J.P. Sprinkle family in 1910. Sold to Fielden Hale Jennings in 1925, who operated the mill for 58 years as the largest village employer. Now used as Lewisville Hardware. Oldest continuously occupied commercial building in Lewisville. — Map (db m53006) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewisville United Methodist Church — Establised 1878
The church was established in 1878 by Methodists from Brookstown and Sharon. The chief founder, Augustus Eugene Conrad, made plans for the first church, a one room building, and it was dedicated in 1882. It was replaced with a three-story brick . . . — Map (db m53023) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Methodist Church Parsonage
In 1884 the Forsyth Circuit of the Methodist Church bought this house, known as the Wesley Vogler house, for a parsonage. The Circuit consisted of twelve churches in western Forsyth County. By 1901 the Lewisville Charge had been created and took . . . — Map (db m53020) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — New Hope AME Zion Church — 1883 — Date of Deed
New Hope Church is the oldest continuing African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church within the Township of Lewisville. This church is among the oldest AME Zion congregations in Forsyth County. — Map (db m54288) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — J-9 — Shallow Ford
Colonial route across Yadkin River. Scene of Tory defeat by Whigs, 1780. Crossing used in 1781 by army of Lord Cornwallis. 600 yds. S. — Map (db m51877) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Shiloh Lutheran Church
Founded in 1777 as the German Church Beyond Muddy Creek. Named Gerber's Church in 1813. Graveyard and old church site, quarter mile east. Called Shiloh since circa 1860. Present sanctuary built in 1883. Oldest congregation in Lewisville. — Map (db m53024) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Site of Lewisville Academy — Founded 1901
Lewisville Academy, the first public high school in Forsyth County, was established in 1901. Lewisville Academy became a part of the consolidated Forsyth County School System in 1907. This site has served as the location of three subsequent public . . . — Map (db m53008) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Site of Sunny Acres — ca. early 1930's
Built by Miss Anna Ogburn of Winston-Salem, a Methodist philanthropist and benefactor. The large 200-foot long house was originally used as a country retreat for underprivileged children and as a Methodist Church conference center. Later Sunny Acres . . . — Map (db m53017) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Vogler-Reynolds House
Late nineteenth century homestead of James Emmanuel and Elizabeth Irene Standiford Vogler. Residence of Lamb Archibald and Bessie Binkley Reynolds from 1904-1917 and 1924-1961. L. A. Reynolds, a leading nurseryman in Forsyth County, operated his . . . — Map (db m53019) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Apothecary Shop 1763
Constructed for the apothecary (pharmacist), this building was both his home and office. For medicinal purposes, the apothecary dissolved and distilled various herbs and plants--some grown in his garden and others found in nearby fields. . . . — Map (db m53452) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bake Oven 1753 — (reconstructed)
The Brothers, tired of eating unleavened "journey cakes" (johnnycakes), began building an oven to bake bread almost immediately upon arrival. Although once found throughout the thirteen colonies, no original oven currently exists; however, there is . . . — Map (db m53512) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bastion 1756
In the late 1750s Indian hostilities spread through Bethabara and the surrounding area. When the palisade fort was built, these bastions offered good defense by allowing a man to see up and down each side of the fort. Night watch duty was assigned . . . — Map (db m53490) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bell House — (reconstructed)
A bell used in Bethabara to strike the hours and to call the people together for services, or emergencies, such as the Flax House fire in 1776. The first bell--the only one within 200 miles of Bethabara--frightened Cherokee Indians from the fort in . . . — Map (db m53455) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bethabara Fort 1756-63 — (reconstructed)
The French and Indian War (1754-63) prompted the peaceful Moravians, in the midst of busy harvest time and in only 18 days, to build a five-sided palisade around the central part of the community. Later, such fortifications were added to the mill . . . — Map (db m53517) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bethabara Tavern 1757
Accommodating strangers was difficult until the Brethren built the first tavern in 1757. This tavern served until 1775, when the new tavern was opened on the east side of the extensive community gardens. The old 1757 tavern partially collapsed very . . . — Map (db m53509) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Calf Barn 1765 — (reconstructed)
According to a 1766 map a calf barn was erected on this site in 1765. The map suggests it was made of two equal sized barns, like this one, connected by an open roofed area. The current structure, a late 18th or early 19th-century timber-framed barn . . . — Map (db m54350) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Community Garden 1759 — (reconstructed)
The earliest garden was planted near the Wagner Cabin in 1754. The area was later enlarged by the head garnener, Jacob Lung, to include one half acre and appear as they do today. The members of the community worked in the garden together and then . . . — Map (db m53519) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Kitchen 1766
In the face of frontier hardships the Moravians practiced common housekeeping. Their system of communal living meant that every member of the congregation had a share in the necessary tasks of sustaining the town, such as raising cabins, clearing . . . — Map (db m53459) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Store 1759 & 1764
Opened in 1759, the Bethabara store played an important role in the life of the community. It provided basic goods, not only to the Moravians, but also to customers from many miles around. The store served as a shipping point for Moravian goods sent . . . — Map (db m53480) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Store Addition after 1766
This addition to the Bethabara store was built sometime after 1766, according to surviving maps. Notice the fireplace base support extending to the cellar floor. Additions to Moravian buildings were common, often based more on practicality that . . . — Map (db m53483) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Distiller's House 1803
After a December 2, 1802 fire, which destroyed the original 1756 brewery and distillery, this home was built during the spring and summer of 1803 for the community's distiller, Hermann Buttner, and his wife. Some of the materials were probably . . . — Map (db m53443) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Doctor's Laboratory 1759
This building served as the workshop for the Bethabara doctors. Hans Martin Kalberlahn, the first doctor in Wachovia, died shortly after the building was completed. He was followed by many capable and dedicated physicians. The doctor served not only . . . — Map (db m53451) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Dwelling House/Cow House 1754 — (reconstructed)
Within weeks of their first arrival, the Brothers found the need to build a guesthouse for the "strangers" who came to seek the services of the doctor, lawyer and tradesmen. However, this particular structure was converted into a "house" for cows by . . . — Map (db m53508) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Family House 1758
The Moravians in Bethabara used a "choir" system, which assigned each member of the congregation to a group according to age, sex and marital status. Nevertheless, the importance of the individual family remained a vital part of community life. As . . . — Map (db m53454) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Flour Bin 1758
Added to the bakery, which adjoined the bin on the northeast side, this was a secure storage place for flour supplied by the Moravians' mill (1755). This bakery supplied the town with bread unitl it was replaced by a new bakery in 1782. . . . — Map (db m53495) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Gemeinhaus 1756
This large two-story log building was the first Moravian Congregation House, or church, in North Carolina. It was begun in 1755 and consecrated in February, 1756. It contained the Gemeinsaal (meeting hall) and living quarters for the Minister's . . . — Map (db m53518) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Gemeinhaus 1788
This was the second Gemeinhaus, or Congregation House, built by the Moravians in Bethabara. Today it is the oldest surviving Moravian church in the southeast and the oldest surviving colonial German church with attached living quarters in the United . . . — Map (db m53448) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Hans Wagner Cabin 1752 — (reconstructed)
Hans Wagner, a hunter, trapper and miller, and his teenage son built this cabin in 1752, but left for new land on the Yadkin River, when the Moravians purchased the Wachovia Tract. On November 17, 1753, the first 15 Brothers found the abandoned . . . — Map (db m53515) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Locksmith and Gunsmith Shop 1759
From 1759 to 1786 this building housed a locksmith and gunsmith shop. Customers came from miles around Bethabara, often staying several days in the village, while having work done by the talented Moravian craftsmen. Master Potters Rudolph Christ, . . . — Map (db m53500) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Log House ca. 1816
This log house was built on the site of an earlier 1759 house. Although the date of its construction is still under investigation, according to the Records of the Moravians this house may have been built as early as 1816. Over the years it was . . . — Map (db m53516) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Medical Gardens 1761 — (reconstructed)
The first Medical Garden (Hortus Medicus) was planted here in 1756 for Dr. Hans Martin Kalberlahn. This reconstruction is based upon the Christian Gottlieb Reuter map of Dr. August Schuberts' 1761 garden. The map indicates the plants for each bed. . . . — Map (db m53520) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Memorial Marker 1806
On November 26, 1806, this marker was erected as a memorial to the beginning of the settlement of the Unity of Brethren (Moravians) in Wachovia. It was moved here in 1850, having been placed originally at the site of the first cabin occupied by the . . . — Map (db m53445) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Mill-Wright's House 1762
This small cellar, like many in Bethabara, was beneath a larger house. Stone steps and a place for wooden steps both into the cellar, show access from the inside and outside the house. "Toward the end of May our mill-dam was swept away by . . . — Map (db m53498) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — New Bethabara Tavern 1775
From 1775 until 1787 the new Bethabara Tavern was operated here. Between 1787 and 1801 the building served as the community store while also providing lodging for travelers. The building stood until 1824, apparently continuing to operate as a tavern . . . — Map (db m53506) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — New Tavern Well 1755
Eighteenth century roads were always either dusty or muddy, a traveler would welcome the site of a fresh water well beside a tavern. This well still contains part of its early wooden pump stock. A similar stock was retrieved by the archaeologists in . . . — Map (db m53505) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Dependency 1756
This building handled the overflow and storage of pottery, and was in use by the potter from 1756 until 1771. When the cellar was being excavated in the 1960s, large fragments of pottery and many Lovefeast mugs were found lying on the . . . — Map (db m53493) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Shop 1755
Gottfried Aust, the first Moravian potter in North Carolina, moved into this shop after it was built in 1755. He, and several other potters who followed him in Bethabara, produced utilitarian redware pottery including many kinds of vessels, mugs, . . . — Map (db m53491) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Shop Addition between 1763-1766
Br. Aust, the first potter in Bethabara, moved his business to the new central town of Salem on June 17, 1777. He took down the addition to the Potter's Shop, in order to move the woodwork. Three other significant potters--Christ, Krause, and . . . — Map (db m53492) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Sleeping Hall 1754 — (reconstructed)
By early February 1754, the Brothers decided to build a sleeping hall to help relieve the crowded conditions in the Wagner Cabin. The 13'x50' interpretive reconstruction uses post-and-log construction techniques, with fence rails for the walls. This . . . — Map (db m53511) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Smith's House 1762
New arrivals from Pennsylvania helped to swell Bethabara's population to 75 and 15 outside laborers. As the size of the village grew so did the need for houses and shops. The cellar of this 1762 Smith's House was filled with dirt in the early . . . — Map (db m53499) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Smithy and Christ Pottery 1759
Bethabara's second smithy (blacksmith shop) stood on this site in 1759. In 1755 the first smithy opened for business, and in the active years of building construction in Bethabara, the blacksmith was kept busy supplying necessary hardware and . . . — Map (db m53501) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Store House, Shed and Lodging For Strangers 1754 — (reconstructed)
On February 8, 1754, the Brothers began construction on a "cabin for strangers"; they completed it the following day. It measured 8' by 8', had a fireplace and enough room for two sick guests. In July 1754, another pen, measuring 6' by 8', was added . . . — Map (db m53513) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Summerhouse 1759 — (reconstructed)
This summerhouse was built in 1759 by Christian Triebel, the chief carpenter, later in charge of construction of the first buildings in the new town of Salem. This reconstruction reflects Triebel's carpenter skills and the existence of the Bethabara . . . — Map (db m53502) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tailor's Shop 1764
One of the Moravians to come to Bethabara in 1753 was a tailor, and his 1756 shop stood near the pottery on the town square. When this new tailor's shop was built in 1764, the first shop became a dining room for the Brothers House. Governor Tryon . . . — Map (db m53496) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tailor's Shop Addition and Well after 1766
In the floor of the cellar of this addition to the 1764 Tailor's Shop, a depression was found containing the remains of a small wooden box. A drain leading to the box indicates that water collected in the box and that it was probably used to cool . . . — Map (db m53497) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tavern Well 1763
Fresh drinkable water was important to a colonial community such as Bethabara. In addition to using natural springs in the area, the Moravians dug wells and lined them with stone. Mechanical wooden pumps were more advanced than rope and bucket, and . . . — Map (db m53510) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — The Brothers House 1755
Between November 1754 and June 1755 this large dwelling was built by and for the single men of Bethabara. The cellar you see here was dug beneath one end of the two story log building. This important house served as assembly, dining and sleeping . . . — Map (db m53489) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — The Dyer's and Potter's House 1782
Johannes Schaub, Jr., a dyer, built this house in 1782. It is the oldest brick house in Forsyth County. This house, its additions and out buildings, served from 1789 until 1872 as the home and shop to a succession of Bethabara potters. . . . — Map (db m53446) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Vorsteher's House 1758
This framework and brick home was built in 1758 for the Vorsteher (for-shtay-er), who served his community as business manager and treasurer. His duties would have been similar to those of the present-day city manager's. Due to soil erosion, the . . . — Map (db m53453) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Wachovia Settlement
Wachovia Settlement begun 17 November 1753 — Map (db m53444) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Wash House 1754 — (reconstructed)
This is an interpretive reconstruction of the house used by the Brothers to wash their clothes. The spaces between the logs (the chinks) were not filled with daubing in order to facilitate the movement of fresh air. "This afternoon we had a . . . — Map (db m53514) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Well 1763
This well, one of three dug in 1763, stood on the town square and probably served the needs of many of the central buildings in Bethabara. It had a mechanical pump for bringing up the water, rather than a rope and bucket. This well was still the . . . — Map (db m53456) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Pfafftown — Brookstown United Methodist Church — Established 1853
Founded by the Phillip N. Mock family who gave one acre of land for the church. Founding members of the congregation donated timber and labor for the construction of the original, single-room log building. The second building was constructed in . . . — Map (db m53724) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Rural Hall — J-51 — Nazareth Church
Lutheran. Begun about 1778 by German settlers. Formerly called "Old Dutch Meeting House." Present building, 1878. — Map (db m52533) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston Salem — First Sit-In Victory In North Carolina
On February 8, 1960, Carl Wesley Matthews began the city's sit-in demonstration alone at lunch counters near this site and was soon joined by students from Winston-Salem Teachers College, Atkins High School, and Wake Forest College. The nonviolent . . . — Map (db m16905) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — "Log House" — ca. 1816
A Federal House later modified in the Greek-Revival style. Research currently being conducted to prepare building as an exhibition of Historical Restorations. — Map (db m51999) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 1753 Great Philadelphia Wagon Road
The most heavily traveled in Colonial America passed near here, linking areas from The Great Lakes to Augusta, GA. Laid out on animal and Native American Trading & Warrior Paths. Indian treaties aming NY, PA, VA and the Iroquois League of Five . . . — Map (db m52540) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 26th N.C. Regimental Band — 1862-1865
Organized in Salem, NC, March 1862, with members from local Moravian congregations. This volunteer Confederate band provided morale-building music for southern troops in many of the major campaigns during the War Between the States. The band was . . . — Map (db m52153) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — African-American West End Area
The neighborhood formerly located on the site of the baseball stadium was a noteworthy African-American area. It was established on land originally owned by Nathaniel T. Watkins, a local merchant. By the early 1900s, the area functioned as part of . . . — Map (db m52152) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Carver High School
Since 1936, Carver High School has been a source of pride, accomplishment and enthusiasm for Winston-Salem and Forsyth County. It was the first high school to serve African-American students outside the Winston-Salem city limits, who otherwise would . . . — Map (db m52750) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — City Hall
Completed in 1926, City Hall has been the seat of Winston-Salem's government since its construction. An integral part of Winston-Salem's downtown streetscape, City Hall was designed by the local architectural firm of Northup and O'Brien. City Hall . . . — Map (db m51721) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 6 — Community and Medical Gardens — (Reconstructions) — 1759 and 1761
The only known well-documented Colonial Community Garden and the earliest known well-documented Colonial Medical Garden in the United States. — Map (db m53102) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Daniel Boone Trail
In Memory of Trail Maker Hunter and Pioneer DANIEL BOONE Who Hunted Fished and Fought in the Streams and Forests of this and Adjoining Counties During the Middle of the 18th Century --- This Monument is erected by the . . . — Map (db m53726) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Downtown North Historic District
The Downtown North Historic District is an area of commercial buildings that developed during the early part of the 20th century. Located north of Winston-Salem's central business district, the district served as the working person's downtown, where . . . — Map (db m51973) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 7 — First Village — (Reconstruction) — July 1754
The original frontier settlement of the 15 single brothers who arrived from Bethlehem, PA on November 17, 1753 They travelled on the nearby Great Philadelphia Wagon Road. — Map (db m53103) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-65 — Fraternity Church of the Brethren
Oldest German Baptist (Dunker) congregation in North Carolina. Est. ca. 1775 near Muddy Creek, one mile south. — Map (db m51880) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-63 — Friedberg Church
Moravian. Begun in 1759, organized in 1773; first church and school built in 1769. Third structure, 1825; located 1.6 mi. W. — Map (db m51881) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Gemeinhaus — 1788
The only German Colonial Church with attached living quarters remaining in the United States. Moravian Wachovia tract leader Frederic Marshall designed building. — Map (db m51998) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — George Black House and Brickyard
This was the home and brickyard of the nationally-known brickmaker George H. Black from 1934 until his death in 1980 at the age of 101. Black, the son of former slaves, came Winston-Salem as a child. He worked for the Hedgecock and Hime Brickyard, . . . — Map (db m52674) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — George Henry Black Memorial — Master Brickmaker — 1879-1980
Honoring his contribution to the architectural beauty of his community and historic sites throughout America. — Map (db m52675) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Happy Hill
Happy Hill has played a prominent role in the life of Winston-Salem's African American community since the early years of the 19th century, when it was home to slaves on a farm serving the Moravian town of Salem. The first school for . . . — Map (db m52814) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 2 — Herman Buttner House — 1803
Distiller's house rebuilt from materials of the 1779 House and Distillery, which burned in 1802. Only Distiller's house in Forsyth County. — Map (db m53092) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Historic Bethabara Park 1753 — (Community Garden)
Welcome to the Historic Bethabara Park Community Garden. Restored in 1990, this garden is the only well-documented colonial community garden in America. The original frontier garden of the Moravian settlers was established in 1754 to nourish the . . . — Map (db m54352) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Hotel Zinzendorf
Opening in May 1892, the Hotel Zinzendorf was a resort hotel developed by the West End Hotel and Land Company. The hotel was a venture by local business leaders to add tourism to a booming industrial, and largely tobacco-based, economy. Designed by . . . — Map (db m51983) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 3 — Krause-Butner Pottery Shop — 1782
The oldest brick house in Forsyth County. Built by Johannes Schaub, Jr., as a Home and Dyer Shop. Sold to Gottlob Krause for home and pottery in 1789. John Butner purchased Home and Pottery in 1802. — Map (db m53094) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Lloyd Presbyterian Church
The congregation of Lloyd Presbyterian Church was formed in the 1870s as part of a national movement by Northern missionaries to establish African-American Presbyterian churches in the South. Lloyd Presbyterian Church's current building was . . . — Map (db m51974) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Maynard Field
Operating from 1919 until the mid-1930's, Maynard Field was the first commercial airfield in North Carolina. The airfield was named for Lt. Belvin W. Maynard, a North Carolina native and pioneer aviator. In October 1919, the Winston-Salem Board of . . . — Map (db m52852) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-105 — N.C. Federation of Women's Clubs
Volunteer service group promoted suffrage, education, and other social, cultural causes. Founded 1902 one-half mi. SE. — Map (db m51714) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-71 — Nissen Wagon Works
Begun in 1834 by John Nissen. By 1919, fifty wagons a day were produced. Sold in 1925. Was located here. — Map (db m52203) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-83 — North Carolina School of the Arts
Est. 1963; opened 1965. First state-supported school for performing arts in U.S. A campus of The University of North Carolina since 1971. — Map (db m54390) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Odd Fellows Cemetery
The Odd Fellows Cemetery is believed to have started in 1911 by the Twin City Lodge and the Winston Star Lodge, both African-American fraternal organizations. The Odd Fellows Cemetery is one of Winston-Salem's oldest African-American graveyards . . . — Map (db m52623) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Palisade Fort — 1756-1763 — (Reconstructed)
The only French and Indian War Fort in the Southeast reconstructed on its original site. This five-sided palisade was built around the central part of the community for protection from Indian aggression. A second fort was located at the Mill Site on . . . — Map (db m52000) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-72 — R. J. Reynolds — 1850-1918
Founder of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. In 1875 built his first factory in Winston. Grave 1 block E. — Map (db m51716) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — R. J. Reynolds High School and Auditorium
R. J. Reynolds High School and Auditorium were designed by Charles Barton Keen in the Neo-Classical Revival style and completed in 1923-1924. Made possible through the philanthropy of Katherine Smith Reynolds, wife of R. J. Reynolds, the complex is . . . — Map (db m51984) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Reynolda Historic District
The Reynolda Historic District was part of the country estate developed from 1912-1919 by Richard Joshua Reynolds and his wife, Katherine Smith Reynolds. Financed by the enormous wealth generated by Reynolds' tobacco industry, the estate was a farm . . . — Map (db m51370) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-54 — Reynolda House
Built in 1917 by founder of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Dedicated 1965 as center for advancement of arts and higher education. — Map (db m31617) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Richard Joshua Reynolds — 1850 - 1918
In 1875 this young Virginian aged 24 rode into Winston in search of a town in which to build his first tobacco factory. Through the generosity of the citizens of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County this memorial has been erected to honor a . . . — Map (db m51717) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-38 — Robert B. Glenn — 1854-1920
Governor, 1905-1909; legislator. Champion of Prohibition and of railroad regulation. Home stood 1 block W. — Map (db m31615) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-86 — Robert M. Hanes — 1890-1959
Banker. Economic adviser to post-World War II Europe. A founder of the Research Triangle Park. Home was 50 yds. W. — Map (db m31616) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Safe Bus Company
The Safe Bus Company was chartered in 1926, when several small "jitney" services merged their operations to better serve Winston-Salem's African-American citizens. With the motto "safety and service," Safe Bus Company eventually employed more than . . . — Map (db m51971) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-106 — Salem Academy and College
Moravian settlers in 1772 founded a school for girls, now a liberal arts college & academy. Campus is 1/2 mi. N.E. — Map (db m52136) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Concert Hall
Site of Salem Concert Hall in which were held the First Courts of Forsyth County 1848 - 1850 — Map (db m54259) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Cotton Manufacturing Company and Arista Cotton Mill
Known also as the Fries Mill Complex, the former Salem Cotton Manufacturing Company and Arista Cotton Mill is the oldest physical reminder of the textile industry in Winston-Salem. Completed in 1836, the Salem Cotton Manufacturing Company was . . . — Map (db m51815) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Moravian Graveyard — "God's Acre"
. . . — Map (db m54393) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Town Hall
The Salem Town Hall was Salem's last municipal building before the Town's consolidation with Winston in 1913. The last of Salem's town halls to remain standing, the building was designed by the prominent local architect Willard C. Northup and . . . — Map (db m51720) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Waterworks
In 1771, the Moravian Town of Salem completed construction of one of the first public waterworks systems in the American Colonies. Tapping natural springs located nearby, the system used bored logs, joined and buried underground, to deliver the . . . — Map (db m51982) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Shamrock Mills
In 1911, Shamrock Knitting Mills was the first structure built by the Hanes Hosiery empire. Originally, the company manufactured cotton socks for children and men. In 1914, Shamrock Knitting Mills was renamed Hanes Hosiery Mills Company, and in . . . — Map (db m51817) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-101 — Simon G. Atkins — 1863-1934
Founded Slater Academy, now Winston-Salem State Univ.; president, 1892-1904, 1913-34. Religious and community leader. Lived one block west. — Map (db m52208) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Simon Green Atkins House
The Atkins House was built by Simon Green Atkins in 1893. Atkins was responsible for the development of the Columbian Heights neighborhood and for the creation of Slater Industrial Academy, later Winston-Salem University. Dr. Atkins came to . . . — Map (db m52735) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — The Home of Simon G. Atkins — 1863-1934
Founder of Slater Academy Now Winston-Salem State University; President, 1892-1904; 1913-1934 Religious and Community Leader. House Originally Located Three Blocks West of Current Location — Map (db m52739) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — The Mickey Coffee Pot
Built in 1858 by the brothers Samuel and Julius Mickey, Moravian descendants of the founders of Salem, this landmark originally stood as a sign in front of their tin shop at the corner of South Main and Belews Streets in Salem — Map (db m54264) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — The Pond
At the turn of the 20th century, Winston's water reservoir was located at the top of Trade Street Hill, where Eighth and Trade Streets intersected. Disaster struck in the early morning hours of November 2, 1904, when people in the neighborhood were . . . — Map (db m52691) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-110 — Wachovia Tract
On Dec. 27, 1752, survey for Moravian settlement began near here. Bishop August Spangenberg led frontier expedition that selected 98,985 acres. — Map (db m51879) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-50 — Wake Forest University
Founded 1834 in Wake County by N.C. Baptist Convention. Moved to Winston-Salem in 1956. — Map (db m51782) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-97 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington spent night of May 31, 1791, at the tavern in Salem. 1/2 mile north — Map (db m52135) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — West Salem Historic District
The West Salem Historic District recognizes West Salem's importance in the development of Salem and the growth of Winston-Salem. The neighborhood initially was settled as farms on "outlots" serving Salem during the late 18th and early 19th . . . — Map (db m52151) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-31 — Winston-Salem State University
Established for Negroes as Slater Industrial Academy, 1892. State supported since 1895; University since 1969. — Map (db m52206) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-52 — Wm. Cyrus Briggs — 1861-1918
Invented in 1898 one of the first successful automatic cigarette machines. Workshop was 3 blocks east. — Map (db m51715) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-55 — Bennett College
Methodist. Begun 1874; reorganized as woman's college, 1926. Named for Lyman Bennett of Troy, N.Y. Campus 2 bl. S. — Map (db m54064) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement
Four Students at North Carolina A & T State University conducted the first lunch counter sit-in on February 1, 1960 at the Woolworth Store. Franklin McCain Joseph McNeil Ezell Blair, Jr. David Richmond "Sometimes taking a stand . . . — Map (db m54076) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Christian Isley House
Originally located in eastern Guilford County this one-and-a-half story structure was the home of Christian and Mary Isley. Like other German families, the Isleys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1788 they purchased approximately 300 . . . — Map (db m54098) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Confederate Arms Factory
The Tarpley breech-loading carbine was manufactured by Tarpley, Garrett & Co. at the site of the old Pioneer Foundry, located 300 yards east. Jere A. Tarpley received a patent from the Confederate Government for the carbine on February 14, 1863. In . . . — Map (db m34096) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-22 — Confederate Cabinet
Members of the cabinet, fleeing south, occupied a railroad car near this spot, Apr. 11-15, 1865. — Map (db m31033) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 30 — Confederate Hospital
Confederate hospital set up in the First Presbyterian Church to receive wounded from battle of Bentonville, 1865, was here. — Map (db m2284) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
[ Upper Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Wilbur Lee Mapp 1994 [ Main Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned to speak at Trinity AME Zion Church in Greensboro (a few blocks from here) on April 4, 1968. He canceled his . . . — Map (db m54074) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Dr. Ronald E. McNair
Dedicated in Memory of Dr. Ronald E. McNair 1950 - 1986 • Astronaut • Scientist • Humanitarian "A genuine American Hero who carried the name of A & T State University magnificently to the far corners of the universe." . . . — Map (db m54072) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Edward R. Murrow — 1908 - 1965
Pioneer in Broadcast Journalism and Guilford County Native Sculpture by Ogden Deal Commissioned by Greensboro Chamber of Commerce and Cumberland Development Corporation 1970 — Map (db m54071) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Francis McNairy House
Originally located in northwest Guilford County, this two-story log house was the home of Francis and Mary Boyd McNairy. Like other Scots-Irish families, the McNairys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1762, they purchased 640 acres of . . . — Map (db m54097) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-80 — George Preddy — 1919-1944
World War II fighter pilot. N.C.'s leading ace. Killed in action. Home 1 block east. — Map (db m54067) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-109 — Greensboro Law School
Est. by Robert P. Dick & John H. Dillard in 1878. About 300 graduates licensed. School, which was here, closed 1893. — Map (db m30918) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-21 — Jefferson Davis
The President of the Confederacy held two meetings of his cabinet, April 12-13, 1865, at the home of J. T. Wood, which was a few yards N. — Map (db m31078) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-81 — Lindsay Street School
The first permanent public graded school in N.C. opened in 1875 in a building which stood on this site. — Map (db m54060) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Men of Greensboro and Guilford County
To the memory of the men of Greensboro and Guilford County, who fought for North Carolina and the Confederacy in the War for Southern Independence. 1861     -     1865 These while in the prime of life, fought, bled and died; walking in the steps of . . . — Map (db m34178) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 104 — Mount Hecla Mill
First steam-powered cotton mill in N.C. Operated ca. 1934-80 in large brick building that stood 2 blocks N. — Map (db m2288) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-29 — N.C. A. & T. University
Chartered in 1891 as a land grant college for blacks. Since 1972 a campus of The University of North Carolina. — Map (db m54070) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 102 — North Carolina Railroad
Opened interior of N.C. The ground-breaking took place nearby, July 11, 1851. First president, John Motley Morehead. — Map (db m34097) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — O Henry's Family
William Sydney Porter, 1862-1910, better known by his pen name O Henry, gained fame as a gifted short story writer. O Henry's parents, Dr. Algernon Sidney Porter and Mary Jane Virginia Swaim Porter, his grandparents, Sidney and Ruth Worth Porter, . . . — Map (db m54078) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Original Methodist Church / Former Methodist Cemetery
(side 1) Original Methodist Church 1831 Here in 1830-31, 64 Methodists led by Peter Doub built the first church in Greensboro. Moving to a second church on West Market Street in 1851, the congregation relocated a third and final . . . — Map (db m35093) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Richardson Civic Center
On this site, members of the First Presbyterian Church of Greensboro built their first house of worship in 1832, and on the adjacent land citizens of Greensboro erected the first graded public school in North Carolina in 1875. These grounds and the . . . — Map (db m54095) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-79 — Sit-Ins
Launched the national drive for integrated lunch counters, Feb. 1, 1960, in Woolworth store 2 blocks south. — Map (db m30921) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — The Army of Tennessee
They are all gone now with their tattered flags and their faded uniforms. Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, Jonesboro, Franklin, . . . — Map (db m54050) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Home of Richard Mendenhall — c. 1811
Built in the center of Old Jamestown, near the intersection of Federal and Union Streets, Richard Mendenhall’s house served as a gathering place for residents and a stopover for travelers. This home exemplifies the community of Quaker tradepeople . . . — Map (db m34702) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Richard Mendenhall Store — 1824
Richard Mendenhall built the store as an adjunct to his tanning business. His wares included general goods and food items. During the 20th century the building served as a private residence and also housed a variety of stores and offices. The . . . — Map (db m34703) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Charles Benbow House — Circa 1823
Charles Benbow was born on December 6, 1787 to Thomas and Hannah Benbow. Charles married Mary Sanders on December 11, 1811, and they had seven children. This Quaker style house was conservative in plan, though Charles' application to detail was . . . — Map (db m54329) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Jesse Benbow House — 1858
Jesse Benbow was born in 1815 to Charles and Mary (Saunders) Benbow. In 1838 Jesse married Ann Clark and they had seven children. Jesse designed the house using oak trees from the property for the joists and foundation, and clay from the Haw . . . — Map (db m54331) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — J-36 — Oak Ridge Institute
First building erected 1851-52. Opened during academic year 1852-53. Since 1929 Oak Ridge Military Institute. — Map (db m54125) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Oak Ridge Public School — Opened 1925
The Oak Ridge Public School had a capacity for 123 students and served grades 1-8. The structure contained six classrooms and had two indoor flush toilets, but no cafeteria or gymnasium. The center of the original building included a stage and . . . — Map (db m54344) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Oakhurst — 1897
Oakhurst was built for Martin Hicks Holt, Co-Principal of Oak Ridge Institute, and his wife Mary. The finest Queen Anne style house surviving in all of Guilford County, it was designed by the prominent and prolific southern architect Frank P. . . . — Map (db m54327) HM
North Carolina (Orange County), Hillsborough — Orange County Courthouse, 1845-1957 — Fourth on this Site
Designed and erected, 1844 – 45 by John Berry of Hillsborough, 1798 – 1870 Builder, Architect, Legislator, Humanitarian --------------- Builder of distinguished structures in his native state Contributor to the tradition of American . . . — Map (db m34690) HM
North Carolina (Robeson County), Maxton — I-27 — Carolina College
Operated by Methodist Church, 1911-1926. Site used by Presbyterian Jr. College, 1929-1960; Carolina Military Academy, 1962-1972. One block S. — Map (db m31327) HM
North Carolina (Scotland County), Laurel Hill — I-16 — Sherman's March
As Sherman's army moved north from Georgia, several units passed through Laurel Hill and camped in this vicinity, March 8-9, 1865. — Map (db m31336) HM
North Carolina (Stokes County), Germanton — J-12 — Benjamin Forsyth
Officer in the War of 1812. Mortally wounded in Canada, 1814. Forsyth County named for him. Home stood a few feet north of this spot. — Map (db m52534) HM
North Carolina (Stokes County), Pinnacle — J 68 — Bean Shoals Canal
Attempted ca. 1820-25 by Hiram Jennings for Yadkin Navigation Co. Hamilton Fulton was consultant. Never completed. Ruins located 5 miles S.W. — Map (db m39653) HM
North Carolina (Stokes County), Walnut Cove — Great Wagon Road
An Indian trading and warring path that became a frontier road between Pennsylvania and Georgia in the 18th century. The major road for settlers of the North Carolina back country passed near this place. — Map (db m34361) HM
North Carolina (Stokes County), Walnut Cove — J-43 — Upper Saura Town
A village of the Saura Indians, abandoned by that tribe in the early 18th century, was on Dan River, two mi. S. — Map (db m52537) HM
North Carolina (Surry County), Mt. Airy — M 8 — Stoneman’s Raid
On a raid through western North Carolina Gen. Stoneman’s U.S. cavalry passed through Mount Airy, April 2-3, 1865. — Map (db m54461) HM
North Carolina (Surry County), Pilot Mountain — M-26 — Pilot Mountain
Landmark for Indians and pioneer settlers. Elevation 2,420 feet. State park since 1968. Stands 3 miles west. — Map (db m52050) HM
North Carolina (Watauga County), Blowing Rock — Carriage Roads — Moses H. Cone Memorial Park Carriage Roads and Trails
Flat Top Manor, once the home of textile magnate Moses H. Cone and his family, presides over the former Cone Estate—3,600 acres of forests, meadows and rolling farmlands. Moses Cone, whose hobbies included road-building and cultivating . . . — Map (db m20349) HM
North Carolina (Watauga County), Blowing Rock — Daniel Boone Trail Marker — #26
Donated to the Town of Blowing Rock in loving memory of two brothers and Blowing Rock's sons, Paul and Glenn Coffey by the Coffey Family This monument was erected two blocks north of this site on September 1, 1927. Mr. Thomas H. Coffey . . . — Map (db m43883) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Army of Northern Virginia
General Robert E. Lee commanding The Army consisted of Three Army Corps First Corps Lieutenant General James Longstreet Second Corps Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell Third Corps Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill Cavalry Division Major General . . . — Map (db m11893) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — High Water Mark
(Viewer's Left Side Page):High Water Mark of the Rebellion This Copse of Trees was the Landmark toward which Longstreet's assault was directed July 3, 1863. The Assaulting Column was comprised of Kemper's, Garnett's, and Armistead's Brigades . . . — Map (db m16160) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — North Carolina — 1863
To the eternal glory of the North Carolina soldiers, who on this battlefield displayed heroism unsurpassed. Sacrificing all in support of their cause. Their valorous deeds will be enshrined in their hearts of men long after these transient memorials . . . — Map (db m11559) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Piney River Cabin
Virginia's virgin forest provided materials for the settlers' most basic shelter. Centuries ago, first growth trees were felled and the wood hewn to form this single-room log cabin in Piney River, Virginia, 45 minutes south of here. The structure is . . . — Map (db m53613) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Meadow Run Grist Mill
Not far from the Tavern, the Michie family owned and operated a mill and general store. At the turn of the century the mill fell from decay. In order to recreate the Michie's Tavern-plantation (which stretched for several miles) Historic Michie . . . — Map (db m53611) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Tobacco Barn ca.1790
This barn was once a place to hang and dry harvested tobacco plants. Tobacco was the primary cash crop in early Virginia. Many large landholders, including the Michies, grew tobacco as their principal money-making crop. However, in time, these . . . — Map (db m53612) HM
Virginia (Northampton County), Eastville — Confederate Monument - Eastville, VA
Erected by the Harmanson-West Camp Confederate Veterans, The Daughters of the Confederacy and the citizens of the Eastern Shore of Virginia; to the soldiers of the Confederacy from Northampton and Accomack Counties. They died bravely in war, or in . . . — Map (db m7590) HM
Virginia (Northampton County), Eastville — Debdeavon
"Laughing King of Accomacke Emperor of the Easterne Shoare King of the Great Nussawattocks" A gallant warrior and a loyal friend to the early settlers of the Eastern Shore. His timely warning to the colonists of an intended uprising in 1621, saved . . . — Map (db m7591) HM
Virginia (Northampton County), Eastville — WY-9 — Gingaskin Indian Reservation
The Gingaskin Indian Reservation was located nearby from 1640 to 1813 and was created from a land patent in 1640 that set aside land for the Accomac Indians. When the Accomacs moved there, they became known as the Gingaskins. They continued to . . . — Map (db m7605) HM
Virginia (Northampton County), Eastville — Northampton County Court Green
The Northampton County Court Green is one of the earliest and most complete in Virginia. It includes outstanding examples of early court buildings as well as later structures reflecting the continuity of government in Eastville for well over 300 . . . — Map (db m7589) HM
Virginia (Northampton County), Eastville — WY-10 — Old Courthouse
The courthouse was moved to Eastville in 1677, and court has been held here ever since. The old courthouse was built about 1731; from its door the Declaration of Independence was read, August 13, 1776. Militia barracks were here during the . . . — Map (db m7587) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 22 — Madison Farm Complex — 1760s - 1840s
In the fields in front of you, archaeologists have found the extremely well-preserved remains of James Madison's plantation farm complex, which served as the hub of the working farm and the home for several generations of field slaves. This complex, . . . — Map (db m24050) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 23 — Mount Pleasant c. 1750s — First Madison Family Home Site
James Madison's grandfather, Ambrose Madison, had his slaves construct Mount Pleasant sometime after 1723. Ambrose moved his family here in 1732 from Virginia's Tidewater and unexpectedly died within a few months. Court records show that three . . . — Map (db m24115) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — Slave Cemetery — c. 1820s
The burial ground where you are standing is the final resting lace for many members of Montpelier's enslaved community. Slaves' belief in a spiritual world - originating in African religions - was reinforced by Christianity. This drawing shows . . . — Map (db m24120) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 19 — The African American Cemetery — Discovering Madison
"I walk in the graveyard, I walk through the graveyard To lay this body down. I lay in the grave and stretch out my arms; I lay this body down." -African American spiritual from the era of slavery, as recorded in James Weldon Johnson, the . . . — Map (db m24118) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 21 — The Garden — Discovering Madison
"It was a paradise of roses and other flowers, to say nothing of the strawberries, and vegetables; every rare plant and fruit was sent to him by his admiring friends, who knew his taste, and they were carefully studied and reared by the gardener . . . — Map (db m23985) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 24 — The Madison Family Cemetery — Discovering Madison
"The advice nearest to my heart and deepest in my convictions is that the Union of the States be cherished an perpetuated." -James Madison, Advice to My Country, 1834 The Madison Family Cemetery is the understated resting place for two of . . . — Map (db m24117) HM

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