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Civil War Preservation Trust
Arkansas (Washington County), Prairie Grove — Herron's Attack
From this spot the observer is viewing the fields over which General F.J. Herron's army advanced on the morning of December 7, 1862, to attack the Confederate position on this ridge. Because the ford of the Illinois River was under artillery fire, . . . — Map (db m35415) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 10 of 16 — Washington Navy Yard: Maker of Weapons — Tour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
The white brick wall in front of you marks the original northern boundary of the Navy Yard. The yard grew from its original 12 acres to 128 acres at its peak in 1962. In 2003 it consisted of 73 acres with 55 acres making up the adjacent Southeast . . . — Map (db m10822) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — St. Patrick's Parish — Erected about 1792
First church to be erected in the "Federal City" outside the limits of "George Towne." First pastor, Rev. Anthony Caffrey, brought from Dublin at suggestion of James Hoban, architect of the "Presidential Palace." March 17, 1953. — Map (db m15936) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — William Tecumseh Sherman — 1820 - 1891
"On no earthly account will I do any act or think any thought hostile to or in defiance of the old government of the United States." Alexandria, Louisiana, January 18, 1861 "Wars legitimate object is more perfect peace." Washington, D.C., February . . . — Map (db m8350) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Federal Triangle — 3 — G-Men and G-Women — Make No Little Plans — Federal Triangle Heritage Trail
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is headquartered across Pennsylvania Avenue from this spot. Thanks to popular media, it may be one of the better-known government agencies. Since the 1930s Hollywood has found great stories among the "G-men" . . . — Map (db m57218) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Totten — Fort Totten — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865
Earthworks of Fort Totten are visible within the wooded area 50 yards at the top of this hill. Cannon mounted at Fort Totten helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864. — Map (db m2993) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — Harbour Square
Harbour Square, completed 1966, contains seven historic dwellings. Development of the historic structures was initiated by James Greanleaf in the early 1790's. The financier sold individual lots to Thomas Law for the "Barney House" and the Lewis . . . — Map (db m32573) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-143 — Battle of Natural Bridge — March 6, 1865
Site of decisive repulse of Federal forces by Confederate Militia in joint U.S. Army and Navy Operation to take St. Marks. The Army landing at lighthouse was prevented from getting to rear of St. Marks by Confederate opposition at Newport and . . . — Map (db m13721) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
This Spanish fort, begun in 1672, stood firm against English attacks and helped Spain to hold Florida for many years. During the American Revolution, it was a British stronghold. Later it became a battery in the U.S. coastal defense system. — Map (db m46147) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — Sanchez House
This house was built circa 1809 by Francis Xavier Sanchez and his wife, Mary Hill of Charleston, lately of Virginia. That is the probable reason for the English colonial interior rather than the usual Spanish. This house was retouched for posterity . . . — Map (db m46790) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — William Wing Loring
(Front):In memory of a distinguished American solider, citizen of St. Augustine, Fla. Born December 4, 1818. Died December 30, 1885. His courage in battle was conspicuous; His devotion to duty unfailing; His ability recognized by three . . . — Map (db m47015) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), Summer Haven — F-85 — Massacre of the French — Matanzas Inlet
In 1565 some 300 French castaways, under Jean Ribault, were massacred here by Spaniards, crushing their attempt to occupy Florida. The French ships, sailing from Fort Caroline to attack St. Augustine, were driven ashore by a storm. At this inlet . . . — Map (db m46145) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Evolution of Fort McHenry
After the Battle of Baltimore in 1814, Fort McHenry continued as a military post for more than a hundred years. The U.S. Army constructed buildings outside the star fort and modified existing structures to serve the needs of the time. During the . . . — Map (db m10881) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Locust Point
Established as a port of entry in 1706, this peninsula was originally known as Whetstone Point. Along this road in 1814, soldiers marched to the defense of Fort McHenry, nearby. Port facilities served as a Federal supply camp in the Civil War. Later . . . — Map (db m2561) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Cambridge
Originally part of the Choptank Indian Reservation laid out for them in 1669. Cambridge was made a port of entry by the Assembly in 1684. It is one of the few towns authorized at that early date that has survived. — Map (db m3963) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — 19th Century Backpacker — The Civil War Soldier — Antietam Campaign 1862
An unnamed citizen of Frederick City said the following of the Confederates he had beheld marching through his hometown: “I have never seen a mass of such filthy strong-smelling men. Three in a room would make it unbearable, and when marching . . . — Map (db m1521) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Cobb’s Brigade McLaw’s Division C.S.A. — Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar & Cobbs Georgia Legion
Cobb’s Brigade McLaw’s Division C.S.A. ——•••—— At 1 P.M. on September 14, 1862, Cobb’s Brigade under Gen. Howell Cobb of Athens, GA. marched from Sandy Hook to Brownsville at the west foot of . . . — Map (db m1964) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 3 — Crampton’s Pass Tablet C.P. 3
(September 14, 1862) Upon the approach of the Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, from Jefferson, Col. T. T. Munford, Commanding Cavalry Brigade, prepared to dispute its advance through this Pass. Mahone’s Brigade, Lt. Col. Parham, Commanding, was . . . — Map (db m2023) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Emmitsburg Longrifles
The longrifle was a distinctly American weapon developed on the frontier for accuracy and distance. Produced mainly in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, it became known as the “Kentucky” rifle after a popular song commemorated its use . . . — Map (db m1532) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Barbara Fritchie House — “Shoot if you must this old gray head, but spare your country’s flag.” — Antietam Campaign 1862
As the Confederate army marched through Frederick on September 10, 1862, feisty local Unionists—mostly women—showed their defiance by waving the Stars and Stripes. The poet John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized one of them in “The . . . — Map (db m2693) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Braddock, Washington, and Franklin
On April 23, 1755 At a Tavern located near this spot General Edward Braddock Colonel George Washington and Benjamin Franklin Met to plan the British assault on Ft. Dusquesne During the French & Indian War This plaque erected by the Kiwanis Club of . . . — Map (db m2725) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Lewistown — Lewistown — I Corps’ Muddy March
Gettysburg Campaign When the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Invaded Maryland in June 1863, the Army of the Potomac headed north in pursuit. On Monday, June 29, a “rainy, miserable day,” the 15,000 men, 2,900 horses and mules . . . — Map (db m105250) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — 8 West Main Street — Circa 1800
The dwelling located here at #8 West Main Street is significant as an early 19th century vernacular log building that was modified in the ca. 1930's with the application of a simulated Flemish bond brick veneer facade. It reflects the development of . . . — Map (db m5299) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Middletown — Enemies and Friends — Antietam Campaign 1862
When Gen. Robert E. Lee and part of the Army of Northern Virginia passes through Middletown on September 10–11, 1862, they encountered a chilly reception. The inhabitants of this single-street hamlet on the National Road loved the Union, and . . . — Map (db m21911) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — George Washington
George Washington stopped in a building two hundred yards west of here known as Peter’s Tavern Thursday June 30, 1791. — Map (db m102967) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — DeSellum Family Cemetery
Gravestone Inscriptions James DeSellum // Born June 14 1773 // Died June 27 1847 // Aged 74 years // A useful citizen and sincere Christian. Cathrine DeSellum // Born July 20 1770 // Died June 20 1856 // Aged 88 years // Her . . . — Map (db m1725) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — Caponiere
During the 1840s improvements were made to this wall, defensively the weakest part of the fort. The parapet was raised and an outer work, called a caponiere, was added. The protected passageway on your left will lead you to the outerwork that . . . — Map (db m8075) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Gettysburg Campaign — Invasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m32675) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’ Crossroads
This crossing served during July 10-15, 1863, as an anchor for the flanks of such gathering Federal forces as the Reserve Artillery and the Second, Third, and Twelfth Corps. Minor skirmishes with elements of Lee's besieged Army of Northern Virginia . . . — Map (db m1989) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "We May Never Meet Again"
A few days before the battle, bidding farewell to a friend, Union General Mansfield said: "We may never meet again." Brigadier General William E. Starke, C.S.A. He led the counterattack that helped stop the first Union attack down the . . . — Map (db m6973) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 23rd Ohio Infantry
(Front Inscription): OHIO 23d Infantry Commanded by Major James M. Comly Hugh Ewing's (1st) Brigade Kanawha Division Ninth Army Corps Army of the Potomac (Rear Inscription): This Regiment with its Brigade . . . — Map (db m6669) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 45th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
2nd Brigade 1st Division 9th Corps The regiment advanced 264 yards northwest of this point returning to this position later in the day ————— Casualties at Antietam Killed 1 Wounded 36 Missing 1 Total 38 . . . — Map (db m11424) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Brigadier General William E. Starke
Brigadier General William E. Starke C.S.A. Killed Here. — Map (db m6980) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Clara Barton
(Upper Plaque):During the Battle of Antietam September 17, 1862 Clara Barton brought supplies and nursing aid to the wounded on this battlefield. The act of love and mercy led to the birth of the present American National Red Cross . . . — Map (db m5901) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 16 — First Army Corps — Magilton's Brigade, Meade's Division
U.S.A. First Army Corps. Magilton's Brigade, Meade's Division, Col. Albert Magilton, 4th Penn. Reserves, Commanding. Organization. 3rd Penn. Reserve Infantry, 4th Penn. Reserve Infantry, 7th Penn. Reserve Infantry, 8th Penn. Reserve Infantry, . . . — Map (db m5910) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Georgia Confederate Soldiers
We sleep here in obedience to law; When duty called, we came. when country called, we died. — Map (db m5667) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 388 — Longstreet's Command — Manning's Brigade, Walker's Division
C.S.A Longstreet's Command Manning's Brigade, Walker's Division Col. Van H. Manning, Commanding Organization 3d Arkansas, 30th Virginia, 27th, 46th and 48th North Carolina September 17, 1862 About 10:20 A.M. the 30th Virginia, 46th and 48th . . . — Map (db m5465) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 363 — Longstreet's Command — Cobb's Brigade, McLaw's Division
C.S.A. Longstreet's Command Cobb's Brigade, McLaws'Division Lieut. Col. C.C. Sanders, 24th Georgia Infantry, Commanding Organization 16th Georgia Infantry, Cobb's (Georgia) Legion 24th Georgia Infantry, 15th North Carolina Infantry (September . . . — Map (db m5467) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 364 — Longstreet's Command — Garnett's Brigade, Jones' Division
C.S.A. Longstreet's Command. Garnett's Brigade, Jones' Division, Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett, Commanding. Organization. 8th Virginia Infantry, 19th Virginia Infantry, 18th Virginia Infantry, 28th Virginia Infantry, 56th Virginia Infantry. . . . — Map (db m6505) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 362 — Longstreet's Command — Ransom's Brigade, Walker's Division
C.S.A. Longstreet's Command. Ransom's Brigade, Walker's Division. Brig. Gen. Robert Ransom, Jr., Commanding. Organization. 24th, 25th, 35th and 49th North Carolina Infantry. Branch's (Va.) Battery, Field Artillery. September 17, 1862. Ransom's . . . — Map (db m7205) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Lutheran Cemetery
In March of 1768, Colonel Joseph Chapline executed a deed to the Mount Cavalry Lutheran Church Vestrymen for a church and burial ground at this site. The cost was to be one peppercorn yearly. This graveyard is the oldest in the town of Sharpsburg. . . . — Map (db m7339) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 68 — Ninth Army Corps — Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division
U.S.A. Ninth Army Corps Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division. Brigadier General Edward Ferrero, Commanding. Organization. 51st New York Infantry, 51st Pennsylvania Infantry. 21st and 35th Massachusetts Infantry. September 17, 1862. On the . . . — Map (db m6444) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 56 — Ninth Army Corps
U.S.A. Ninth Army Corps Brig. Gen. Jacob D. Cox, Commanding. September 15-16, 1862. The Ninth Corps moved from Fox's Gap in South Mountain by the Sharpsburg Road, on the morning of September 15 and in the evening encamped in rear of the extreme . . . — Map (db m6446) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 100 — Ninth Army Corps — Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division
U.S.A. Ninth Army Corps Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division Brigadier General Edw. Ferrero, Commanding. Organization. 51st New York, 51st Pennsylvania, 21st and 35th Massachusetts Infantry. (September 17, 1862.) After Ferrero's Brigade carried . . . — Map (db m6610) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 115 — Second Army Corps
U.S.A. Second Army Corps. Major General E.V. Sumner, Commanding. (September 15-16, 1862.) Richardson's Division of the Second Corps, in close pursuit of the Army of Northern Virginia, in its retreat from South Mountain, passed through Boonsboro . . . — Map (db m18078) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — The Onward Rush to Victory or Defeat
Sgt. William Andrews, 1st Georgia Regiment As the battle escalated, Union Gen. Edwin Sumner moved the Second Corps across Antietam Creek and into the battle. The swift waters of the Antietam and the difficult terrain separated the three . . . — Map (db m20652) HM
Missouri (Greene County), Battlefield — Gibson's Mill Site — Wilson's Creek
In the summer of 1861, the small mill of John Gibson stood here. Although Confederate soldiers camped nearby and Union soldiers forded the stream here, the mill escaped the heavy fighting that raged just downstream. In 1966 archeologists discovered . . . — Map (db m35147) HM
New York (Chemung County), Elmira — Major General John Sullivan
1779 - 1929 in memoriam Major General John Sullivan commander-in-chief and the officers and men of the New Hampshire Brigade who participated in the memorable "Sullivan Campaign" against the Six Nations of Indians Erected by The State of New . . . — Map (db m33543) HM
New York (Chemung County), Elmira — Shohola Railroad Accident Memorial
(Federal Side): Erected by the United Statesto the memory of the following soldiers, privates in the Eleventh Veteran Reserve Corps. Comprising the union guard who were killed with their Confederate prisoners of war in the railroad . . . — Map (db m32180) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Byesville — 30-1 — Wreck of the Shenandoah
“Wind increasing in volume. Get no chance to....” These were the last words from the doomed Navy airship Shenandoah, caught in a violent storm and crashing 7 miles southwest of this spot near Ava at dawn, September 3, 1925. Fourteen of . . . — Map (db m70422) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — "... you know nothing about the lesson anyhow."
"We will close...you know nothing about the lesson anyhow." With those words, Pennsylvania College Professor Michael Jacobs reluctantly gave in to the distraction of mounting cannon and musketry fire on the morning of July 1, 1863, and dismissed his . . . — Map (db m32375) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — "...the busiest scene I ever witnessed..."
On July 8, 1863, the U.S. Sanitary Commission commandeered the three story Fahnestock Bros. buildings as their "stone house" for food and other supplies. From here these critical provisions were distributed daily to the many field hospitals in and . . . — Map (db m32509) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 111th New York Infantry — 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division — 2nd Corps
(Front):111th New York Infantry. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division 2nd Corps. (Back):111th New York Infantry Arrived early morning July 2nd 1863, position near Ziegler's Grove. Went to relief of 3rd Corps in afternooon; took this position that . . . — Map (db m14566) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 114th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry — Collis Zouaves
114th Regiment Penna. Infantry Capt. Edward R. Bowen Commanding 1st Brigade, 1st Division 3d Corps July 3d 1863 3 p.m. Collis Zouaves — Map (db m14866) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers — Corn Exchange Regiment — 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Corps
(Front):118th Penna. Vol's Corn Exchange Reg't 1st Brigade 1st Division 5th Corps Army of the Potomac (Left):Engaged in advance of "Wheat Field" July 2, and held this position July 3, and 4, 1863. (Back):Mustered into service . . . — Map (db m17833) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 126th New York Infantry — 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division — 2nd Corps
(Front):126th New York Infantry. 3d Brig. 3d Div. 2d Corps. July 3d 1863. (Back): The Regiment was in position two hundred yards at the left, July 2d until 7 p.m. when the Brigade was conducted thirteen hundred yards further to the . . . — Map (db m14525) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 1st & 2nd Regiments United States Cavalry
Position Occupied by Detachments of the 1st. & 2d. Regiments United States Cavalry During July 3d. 1863. — Map (db m15000) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 20th Connecticut Volunteers — 12th Corps
(Front):20th Conn. Vols. W. B. Wooster. Lt. Col. Comdg. 1st Brig. 1st. Div. 12th A.C.The Brig. Formed on this line on the morning of July 2nd. At eve it moved to support left of army. Returning it found the position and woods in rear occupied . . . — Map (db m13666) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 27th Connecticut Infantry — 4th Brigade, 1st Division — 2nd Corps
. . . — Map (db m15629) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 27th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers Position
This tablet indicates the advanced position of the 27th Regt. Conn. Vols. in its charge the afternoon of July 2, 1863. — Map (db m15627) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 2d Corps Headquarters
Army of the Potomac 2d. Corps Headquarters Major General Winfield S. Hancock July 1,2,3,4 1863 — Map (db m16472) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 2nd Rhode Island Volunteers — 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division — 6th Corps
Skirmish Line 2nd R.I. Volunteers Col. Horatio Rogers Jr. 2nd Brig. 3rd Div. 6th Corps July 4, 1863 — Map (db m17301) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 3rd West Virginia Cavalry
Erected by the state of West Virginia to commemorate the valor and fidelity of the Third West Virginia Cavalry — Map (db m15395) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 5th New Hampshire Infantry Left Flank
Left of Fifth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry Left of Cross' Brigade Left of Caldwell's Division Left of 2d Army Corps — Map (db m15059) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 5th New Jersey Volunteers — 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division — 3rd Corps
(Front):5th New Jersey Vol's Col. William J. Sewell 3d Brig. [Burling's] 2d Div - 3d Corps July 2, 1863 Erected by the State of New Jersey 1888 (Right)The Regiment first held the skirmish line 400 yds. to the front and left of this . . . — Map (db m17333) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 5th Pennsylvania Reserves — 34th Infantry — 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Corps
(Front):5th Pennsylvania Reserves 34th Infantry 3d Brigade 3d Division 5th Corps Mustered in May 28 - June 12 1861 Mustered out June 11 1864 Recruited in Centre, Lancaster, Huntington, Lycoming, Northumberland, Clearfield, Union, and . . . — Map (db m17769) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 65th New York Infantry — (1st U.S. Chasseurs) — 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Corps
(Front):65th N.Y. Infty (1st U.S. Chasseurs) 1st Brig. 3rd Div. 6th Corps (Back):Arrived on the field at 2 p.m. July 2. At daylight of the 3. moved from base of Little Round Top to Culp's Hill. Held this position till 3 p.m. then moved . . . — Map (db m14032) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 6th New Jersey Volunteers — 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 3d Corps
(Front):6th New Jersey Volunteers Lieut. Col. S. R. Gilkyson 3d Brig. Burlings 2d Div - 3d Corps Erected by the State of New Jersey 1888 (Left):Engaged here July 2 1863. Being detached from the Brigade supported batteries on Cemetery . . . — Map (db m15102) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 9th Pennsylvania Reserves — (38th Pennsylvania Infantry) — 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps
(Front):9th Penna. Reserves (38th Penna. Infantry) 3d Brig. 3d Div. 5th Corps (Back): The Regiment arrived on the field July 2nd about 5 p.m. with 377 officers and men and soon after moved to this position and held it until the close . . . — Map (db m14993) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Armistead's Brigade — Pickett's Division - Longstreet's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet's Corps Pickett's Division Armistead's Brigade 9th. 14th. 38th. 53rd. 57th. Virginia Infantry July 2 Arrived about sunset and bivouacked on the western border of Spangler's Woods. July 3 In the . . . — Map (db m11951) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Army of Northern Virginia — July 1, 1863
Heth's and Pender's Divisions Hill's Corps marched from Cashtown to Gettysburg. Anderson's Division Hill's Corps marched from Fayetteville via Cashtown to near Gettysburg. Rodes's Division Ewell's Corps marched from Heidlersburg via Middletown to . . . — Map (db m11828) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Artillery Brigade — Third Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Third Corps Artillery Brigade Capt George E. Randolph Capt. A. Judson Clark 2nd New Jersey Battery, Six 10 pounder Parrotts Capt. A. Judson Clark, Lieut Robert Sims 1st New York Battery D, Six 12 pounders Capt. George B. . . . — Map (db m13153) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Battery D, 1st New York Light Artillery — Artillery Brigade, Third Corps
(Front):Battery D 1st N.Y. Light Artillery, Artillery Brig. Third Corps. (Back):This Battery (Winslow's) held this position during the afternoon of July 2d 1863. Casualties: 10 wounded, 8 missing. Mustered in Sept. 6, 1861. Engaged in . . . — Map (db m15704) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Battlefield Landmarks - West and North — July 3, 1863 - Third Day
"...The whole plain was covered with unarmed rebels, waving coats, hats, and handkerchiefs in token of a wish to surrender." Lt. Col. Franklin Sawyer, U.S.A. 8th Ohio Infantry You are standing at the Union position on Cemetery Ridge, looking west . . . — Map (db m16063) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Brevet Major General Samuel Zook
To the memory of Samuel Kosciusko Zook. Brevet Major General U.S. Vols. Who fell mortally wounded. at or near this spot. while gallantly leading his brigade in battle July 2nd 1863. Erected by Gen. Zook Post. No 11 G.A.R. of Norristown, Pa. July . . . — Map (db m15763) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Camp Colt
The Tank Corps was new. There were no precedents except in basic training and I was the only officer in the command. Now I really began to learn about responsibility. Dwight D. Eisenhower At Ease: Stories I Tell to Friends During World War . . . — Map (db m15127) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Colonel George H. Ward — 15th Massachusetts Volunteers
(Front):Here fell mortally wounded July 2d 1863 George H. Ward, Colonel commanding 15th Regt. Mass. Vols. His comrades and fellow citizens of Worchester raise this memorial of his valor and patriotism. (Back):1st Brig. 2nd Div. 2nd . . . — Map (db m16263) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Cyclorama Focal Point — July 3, 1863 - Third Day
"You will find hard work to convince yourself that you are not standing on the top of Cemetery Ridge in the very center of the position occupied by the troops of the Northern army on that memorable day in July ...." Boston Sunday Globe . . . — Map (db m16061) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Dow's 6th Maine Battery
(Front):Dow's 6th Maine Battery (Left):McGilvery's Brigade. Reserve Artillery. (Right):Campaigns A.P. 1862.-1865. — Map (db m15872) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Ewell's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Ewell's Corps Rodes's Early's and Johnson's Divisions July 4 Having withdrawn under orders from its previous positions the Corps formed line about daybreak on this ridge with its right a short distance south of the . . . — Map (db m17901) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Georgia
Georgia Confederate Soldiers We sleep here in obedience to law. When duty called we came. When country called we died. — Map (db m12296) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Gettysburg College Rooted in History
Founded in 1832 by leaders including the Rev Samuel Simon Schmucker and Thaddeus Stevens, abolitionist and drafter of the 14th Amendment. Gettysburg Office stood in the path of the Union retreat on July 1, 1863, and Pennsylvania Hall served as a . . . — Map (db m11049) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Gordon's Brigade — Early's Division - Ewell's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Ewell's Corps - Early's Division Gordon's Brigade 13th. 26th. 31st. 38th. 60th. 61st. Georgia Infantry July 1 Arrived on the field from Harrisburg Road in the early afternoon and formed line on the North side of Rock . . . — Map (db m11315) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Historic Breastworks — July 2, 1863 - Second Day
"Rude shelters were thrown up of the loose rocks that covered the ground." Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain, U.S.A. Commander, 20th Maine Volunteers The increased range and accuracy of Civil War weapons made prolonged exposure to enemy fire extremely . . . — Map (db m14936) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Kemper's Brigade — Pickett's Division - Longstreet's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet's Corps Pickett's Division Kemper's Brigade 1st. 3rd. 7th. 11th. 24th. Virginia Infantry July 2 Arrived about sunset and bivouacked on the western border of Spanger's Woods. July 3 In the forenoon . . . — Map (db m11953) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Kentucky Memorial
Kentucky honors her son, Abraham Lincoln, who delivered his immortal address at the site now marked by the soldiers' monument. — Map (db m16865) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Major Gen. John F. Reynolds
Commanding Left Wing 1st. 3rd. & 11th. Corps Army of the Potomac July 1st. 1863 Erected by the State of Pennsylvania July 1886 (back of monument) Here Gen. Reynolds Fell — Map (db m6146) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Moore's Battery - Garnett's Battalion — Heth's Division - Hill's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Hill's Corps Heth's Division Garnett's Battalion Moore's Battery The Huger Artillery One 10 pounder Parrott, One 3 inch Rifle And Two Napoleons July 1 The Parrott and Rifle about 3.30 p.m. relieved some of Pegram's guns . . . — Map (db m11449) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Pickett's Charge — July 3, 1863 - Third Day
"I felt proud of that charging column of Americans, even though they were rebels.... They were citizen soldiers, American volunteers." 1st Lt. Benjamin F. Rittenhouse U.S.A. 5th U.S. Artillery, Battery D About 3:00 p.m. on the third day, more than . . . — Map (db m16138) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second Brigade — Third Division - Second Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Second Corps Third Division Second Brigade Col. Thomas A. Smyth Lieut. Col. Francis E. Pierce 14th. Connecticut, 1st. Delaware 12th. New Jersey, 10th. 108th. New York Infantry July 2 Took position early in the morning along a . . . — Map (db m14825) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second Brigade — Second Division - Second Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Second Corps Second Division Second Brigade Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb 69th. 71st. 72d. 106th. Penna. Infantry. July 2 The 69th Penna. took position along the advanced line of the stone wall at the left of the Angle. The . . . — Map (db m16131) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Fight for Devil's Den — July 2 1863 - Second Day
"No, boys, hold your fire until they come right up. Then pour a volley into them, and if they don't stop run your bayonets into their bellies." Brig. Gen. Henry L. Benning, C.S.A. Benning's Brigade, Hood's Division The fate of Devil's Den (located . . . — Map (db m13321) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Third Brigade — Third Division - Second Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Second Corps Third Division Third Brigade Col. George L. Willard Col. Eliakim Sherrill Lieut. Col. James M. Bull 39th (4 cos.), 111th, 125th, 126th. New York Infantry July 2 Took position in the morning along Cemetery Ridge . . . — Map (db m14568) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Wright's Brigade — Anderson's Division - Hill's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Hill's Corps Anderson's Division Wright's Brigade 3rd. 22nd. 48th. Regiments and 2nd. Battalion Georgia Infantry July 1 Formed line here in the forenoon. Advanced at 6 p.m. and dislodged Union troops posted near . . . — Map (db m11894) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Greenmount — Gettysburg Campaign
The Union Army 1st Corps camped here June 30, 1863, on the way to Gettysburg. Followed later by the 11th and 3rd Corps, they marched next morning to relieve Buford's cavalry, already in action west of the town. — Map (db m11717) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Hunterstown — Army of the Potomac — July 2, 1863
Second, Fifth and Sixth Corps, Lockwood's Brigade from the Middle Department, First and Third Brigades Second Cavalry Division, Third Cavalry Division and the Artillery Reserve reached the field of Gettysburg. First and Second Brigades First Cavalry . . . — Map (db m9543) HM
Pennsylvania (Lackawanna County), Scranton — Steamtown National Historic Site
(1) Locomotive Erecting Shop (1909) - where heavy maintenance was done on locomotives. More than 70 locomotives were built here. The facility included a foundry, blacksmith shop, machine shop, and a laboratory. (2) Office and Storage Building . . . — Map (db m19905) HM
Pennsylvania (Northumberland County), Sunbury — Fort Augusta
Built in 1756-57 by Cols. Burd and Clapham and the key frontier outpost of the region. Mansion built 1852. — Map (db m14359) HM
Pennsylvania (Perry County), Duncannon — Pennsylvania Canal — Juniata Division
This Division was built in 1828-33. It extended to the eastern end of the Allegheny Portage Railroad at Hollidaysburg, a distance of 127 miles. Just west of here, the Canal crossed the Juniata by an aqueduct which was used until 1901. Abutment and . . . — Map (db m19541) HM
Pennsylvania (York County), Wrightsville — Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal
Chartered by Pennsylvania, 1835; run by the canal company, 1840 - 1872, and the Reading Railroad till 1894. Followed the river for 45 miles below Columbia. — Map (db m5067) HM
Pennsylvania (York County), Wrightsville — The River: a Corridor and a Barrier — Lancaster-York Heritage Region — Susquehanna River Water Trail
Although the Susquehanna has long been a north-south transportation corridor, it was an impediment to east-west traffic. As early as the seventeenth century,ferries emerged at various points along the river to overcome this barrier. John Wright, an . . . — Map (db m31816) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 8-Inch Columbiad
When the Confederates opened fire in April 1861, several 8-inch Columbiads were mounted in Fort Sumter. This weapon probably has remained here since then, weathering the Union bombardment of 1863 and the clean up of the 1870's. Archeological . . . — Map (db m30646) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Bound For Glory — The Railroad Was A Nation Builder
There is no doubt that the railroad defined an American culture and personality that is distinct from its European roots. At its heart, the railroad was a nation builder - the personification of the brash, entrepreneurial spirit that the rest . . . — Map (db m39927) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Port of Charleston
Since 1670 this well-protected harbor has persisted as a center for shipping and trade. By 1770 Charleston was America's third busiest port; Gadsden's Wharf, located here, became its largest pier. Along this waterfront ships loaded cargo and . . . — Map (db m47522) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Swamp Angel
In 1863 Union forces built a battery about two miles away in the marsh on lower Morris Island (in front of you). They mounted an eight-inch Parrott rifle called the Swamp Angel. This huge gun fired 150-pound shells and was aimed at the city of . . . — Map (db m30367) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — 7-Inch Brooke Rifle, Triple Banded
This quality product from the Confederate Naval Ordnance Works in Selma, Alabama was popular with Confederate artillerymen. Its long range, combined with heavy, accurate projectiles was particularly effective against Federal ironclads and siege . . . — Map (db m32116) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Sullivans Island — Coastal Defense: The Endicott System — 1898 - 1943
Battery Jasper, the black, concrete structure in front of you, was built in 1898 as part of the Endicott System - a series of concrete and steel fortifications armed with heavy-caliber guns, along the U.S. coastline. With the support of smaller . . . — Map (db m31975) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 308 — 12th Tennessee Infantry — Russell's Brigade - Clark's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. 12th Tennessee Infantry, Russell's (1st) Brig., Clark's (1st) Div., Polk's Corps, Army of the Mississippi. This Regiment supported the 4th Tennessee in its charge upon McAllister's Battery at 11 a.m. April 6, 1862 and then supported . . . — Map (db m22222) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 306 — 13th Tennessee Infantry — Russell's Brigade - Clark's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. 13th Tennessee Infantry, Russell's (1st) Brig., Clark's (1st) Div., Polk's Corps, Army of the Mississippi. This regiment supported Stanford's Battery from 3 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. April 6, 1862. — Map (db m21016) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 333 — 154th Tennessee Infantry — Johnson's Brigade - Cheatham's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. 154th Tennessee Infantry, Johnson's (1st) Brig., Cheatham's (2d) Div., Polk's Corps, Army of the Mississippi. This regiment supported Swett's Battery on this line from 3 p.m. to night Apirl 6, 1862. — Map (db m21086) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 320 — 4th Tennessee Infantry — Stewart's Brigade - Clark's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. 4th Tennessee Infantry, Stewart's (2d) Brig., Clark's (1st) Div., Polk's Corps, Army of the Mississippi. This regiment supported Bankhead's Battery from 12 m. to 1 p.m. April 6, 1862. — Map (db m22113) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — A 74 — Camp of 25th Missouri Infantry — Peabody's Brigade - Prentiss' Division — Army of the Tennessee
U.S. Camp of 25th Missouri Infantry, Peabody's (1st) Brig., Prentiss' (6th) Div., Army of the Tennessee. First position in line of battle April 6, 1862, 3 companies 1 mile s.w. in attack upon Confederate pickets; others at s.e. corner of Rhea . . . — Map (db m43246) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 335 — Johnson's Brigade — Cheatham's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. Army of the Mississippi. Johnson's (1st) Brigade, Walker's (2d) Tenn., 15th Tenn., Blythe's Miss., 154th Tenn., Cheatham's (1st) Division, Polk's Corps. The 154th Tenn., a portion of Blythe's Miss. and one company of Walker's (2d) . . . — Map (db m39166) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 110 — Richardson's Battery — Battery D, 1st Missouri Lt. Art. - W.H.L. Wallace's Division — Army of the Tennessee
. . . — Map (db m21479) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 363 — Washington (La.) Artillery — Anderson's Brigade - Ruggles Division — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. Army of the Mississippi. Washington (La.) Artillery, Anderson's (2d) Brigade, Ruggles' (1st) Division, Bragg's Corps. This battery was engaged here April 7, 1862. Three of its guns were captured at 11 a.m., but were soon after recovered. . . . — Map (db m22356) HM
Tennessee (Lauderdale County), Henning — Earthworks Over River Batteries
These earthworks protected the river batteries from attack by land. It is likely that these works were constructed by the Confederates during 1861 or 1862, although there is some evidence that they were constructed by Union forces during 1863. — Map (db m36819) HM
Tennessee (Rutherford County), Murfreesboro — Battle at Stones River
Stones River National Battlefield preserves some key portions of the ground where two great armies of Americans - some 81,000 men - clashed with each other. Their bitter, three-day struggle erupted on New Year's Eve 1862. To explore their . . . — Map (db m37762) HM
Tennessee (Stewart County), Dover — 13,000 Prisoners
Thirteen thousand dejected Confederate defenders of Fort Donelson huddled here against the cold on February 16, 1862. They had fought long and hard against Grant's forces and did not consider themselves defeated. They had been surrendered against . . . — Map (db m38800) HM
Tennessee (Stewart County), Dover — Confederate Breakout — February 15, 1862
"Fill your cartridge boxes, quick, and get into line; the enemy is trying to escape and he must not be permitted to do so." Col. J.D. Webster, USA The advantage lay with the Confederates. They could press the attack and possibly destroy . . . — Map (db m38593) HM
Tennessee (Stewart County), Dover — Dover Hotel — Surrender House
Built between 1851 and 1853, this hotel accommodated riverboat travelers before and after the Civil War. Confederate General Buckner and his staff used the hotel as their headquarters during the battle. After Buckner accepted what he called Grant's . . . — Map (db m38766) HM
Tennessee (Stewart County), Dover — Jackson's Virginia Battery — Buckner's Division
C.S.A. Brigadier General Simon B. Buckner's Division Jackson's Virginia BatteryThis battery of four pieces occupied this position on the night of February 13, 1862. On February 15, it proceeded with the division to the left of the intrenchments . . . — Map (db m38398) HM
Tennessee (Stewart County), Dover — Stankiewicz's Battery
In February 1862 Capt. Peter K. Stankiewicz commanded a battery of one 8-inch howitzer and two 9-pounder iron guns at this location. This battery helped defend against Union Gen. C.F. Smith's attack on Confederate Gen. Simon Buckner's position about . . . — Map (db m38225) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Bombproof
Two bombproofs, each measuring 200 feet long by 12.5 feet wide, were located in the center of Fort Ward. During normal operations the bombproofs were used as meeting rooms, storage facilities, and sometimes as a prison. In the event of an attack, . . . — Map (db m7716) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Z-284 — Nottoway County / Amelia County
(Front): Nottoway County Area 310 Square Miles Formed in 1788 from Amelia, and named for an Indian tribe. Tarleton passed through this county in 1781. Here lived William Hodges Mann, Governor of Virginia 1910-14. (Reverse) Formed in 1734 . . . — Map (db m10220) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Arvonia — F-64 — Arvonia
The name Arvonia was derived from Caernarvon, Wales, home to the Welsh quarrymen who settled the area in the mid-19th century. Arvonia is known for the long-lasting and unfading blue-black Buckingham slate that adorns many of Virginia's historic . . . — Map (db m28974) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), New Canton — F-53 — Carter G. Woodson — 1875 - 1950
Three miles east is the birthplace of the noted teacher, educator and historian, Dr. Carter G. Woodson. He was the founder of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Journal of Negro History, originated negro history week and . . . — Map (db m28972) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Brandy Station — F-12 — Betty Washington
Two miles south is the grave of Betty Washington Lewis, the younger sister of George Washington. She was born in Westmoreland County in 1733 and married Fielding Lewis in May 1750, becoming his second wife. Her husband purchased land in 1752 and . . . — Map (db m4429) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Culpeper — “Gallant” Pelham’s Last Days — The Virginia House and Shackelford House
Confederate cavalry chief Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and Maj. John Pelham, the commander of Stuart’s Horse Artillery, frequented the Virginia House Hotel and often visited the Shackelford family across the street. A warm friendship developed between . . . — Map (db m12496) HM
Virginia (Cumberland County), Farmville — O-55 — James F. Lipscomb
James F. Lipscomb was born a free black on 4 December 1830 in Cumberland County. He worked first as a farm laborer, then as a carriage driver in Richmond. In 1867 he returned to Cumberland County, where he accumulated more than 500 acres of land. . . . — Map (db m30244) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — C-17 — Military Railroad Terminus
Half a mile west is the terminus of the Centreville Military Railroad, the first railroad in the world constructed exclusively for military purposes. Built by the Confederate army late in 1861 because of impassable roads, it supplied the soldiers in . . . — Map (db m887) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Chantilly — Salisbury Plain
This land was the eastern most boundary of a 3,111 acre grant, known as Salisbury Plain, acquired by Henry Lee from Thomas 6th Lord Fairfax in 1725 when it was part of the Stafford County frontier. This area became Prince William County in 1730, . . . — Map (db m4533) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Army Comes to Belvoir
By 1910, the area including Belvoir was sold to the US Government. In 1912, the land was transferred to the War Department, designated for use as an Army training site, and was first used in 1915. By 1918, the area was transformed into Camp . . . — Map (db m34947) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Great Falls — People and the Potomac
Great Falls Park The Potomac River is the second largest watershed feeding the Chesapeake Bay. Early peoples depended on the river for food and made their homes along its banks. European settlers saw the river as a source for transportation, . . . — Map (db m4972) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Herndon — Battle of Dranesville — “First Federal Victory South of the Potomac”
In the fall of 1861, Fairfax County found itself between two large armies. Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston and his army occupied the Centreville area. The Federal army, still regrouping after the devastating defeat at the First Battle of . . . — Map (db m71883) HM
Virginia, Falls Church — Falls Church — Between the Armies
In 1861, Falls Church was a farm village located on the Alexandria-Leesburg Turnpike. On May 24, when Virginia's vote of secession became effective, Union troops crossed the Potomac and occupied Arlington Heights and Alexandria. On June 1, the 2nd . . . — Map (db m2825) HM
Virginia, Falls Church — The Falls Church
This Georgian-style church designed and built in 1767-69 by James Wren, related to Sir Christopher, replacing the 1733 frame structure on 2-acre lot (part of 1729 248-acre Trammel grant). Washington and Mason were vestrymen. After the 1788 . . . — Map (db m2870) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — G-21 — Grapewood Farm Engagement
Pursued by Union detachments after raiding a train north of Catlett Station on 30 May 1863, Confederate Col. John S. Mosby and 50 of his Rangers (43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry) made a stand on a hill just to the north. The Rangers used a howitzer . . . — Map (db m4563) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Elk Run — B-39 — Elk Run Anglican Church Site
Settlers began moving into this region of Fauquier County in the early 1700s. By the 1740s, a wooden church structure served Anglican communicants in Elk Run. It provided pastoral care as well as secular administration for this active frontier . . . — Map (db m2736) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF-5 — Lee’s Narrow Escape
(Six miles southwest of this location), on the morning of 27 Aug. 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee rested at the head of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet’s corps as it marched toward Thoroughfare Gap to join Lt. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m1357) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Paris — Mount Bleak Farm — The Settles Anticipate War
Mosby's Confederacy and First Manassas Campaign In the early morning hours of July 19, 1861, thousands of campfire lights burned in the camp of Col. Thomas J. Jackson's brigade which occupied the fields surrounding nearby Paris. Many thoughts . . . — Map (db m4976) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — Rappahannock Station — A Rare Night Attack on the River — Mosby’s Confederacy
The hamlet of Mill View, present-day Remington, became known as Rappahannock Station to the Civil War armies which campaigned in this area. Here the vital Orange & Alexandria railroad (to your left) crossed the Rappahannock River just behind the low . . . — Map (db m2525) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C-92 — Brentmoor: The Spilman-Mosby House
This classic Italian Villa-style house was completed in 1861 for Fauquier County Judge Edward M. Spilman. James Keith, who later served as president of the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals (1895-1916), acquired it in 1869. John Singleton Mosby . . . — Map (db m1262) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battlefield Center
From this position (Belle Grove Mansion is west of here) most of the VI and XIX U.S. Corps camps were visible on 19 October 1864. The XIX Corps camped close to their earthworks along the ridge to the south. VI Corps units were placed along the . . . — Map (db m3363) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Union Withdrawal
Elements of Brigadier General James W. MacMillan's 1st Division, XIX U.S. Corps, left their part of the earthworks to fight C.S. Major General John B. Gordon's men closer to the Valley Pike. When Colonel Edward L. Molineux's and Brigadier General . . . — Map (db m3429) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — 1790 Stone Church
These native limestone steps are in their original position and mark the main entrance to a 40' x 60' stone church built on this site in 1790. The entrance was in the center of its east wall with the pulpit area against the west wall. This church . . . — Map (db m2634) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — B-16 — Colonel John Singleton Mosby
This road, along which many of his skirmishes took place, is named for Colonel John Singleton Mosby, commander of the 43rd Battalion of the Confederate Partisan Rangers. Their activities in this area helped keep the Confederate cause alive in . . . — Map (db m2668) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Defense of the Stone Wall
Southern General Thomas Jackson was already going by the nickname "Stonewall" when he directed his troops to this location to support the Southern artillery on Sandy Ridge. Ironically, his troops' retreat from this stone wall led to Jackson's only . . . — Map (db m3502) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Third Battle of Winchester — Fording Red Bud Run
"To stop was death. To go on was probably the same; but on we started again." Col. Rutherford B. Hayes, U.S.A. Red Bud Run is as wide and boggy today as it was in 1864. During their attack, the men of the Eighth Corps sank into the . . . — Map (db m3159) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Parker's Battery
. . . — Map (db m8850) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Glendale — Battle Commences
A march of less than three miles from the Glendale battlefield brought the Confederates to this spot at the foot of Malvern Hill. In earlier times it was a peaceful landscape, but on July 1 a line of Union artillery with infantry supports held the . . . — Map (db m15200) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Glendale — Outgunned — Battle of Malvern Hill
General Robert E. Lee hoped that a crossfire of Confederate artillery directed against the crest of Malvern Hill might silence the powerful array of Union guns and clear the way for an infantry charge. Generals Longstreet and Jackson established . . . — Map (db m29399) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Glendale — The Battle of Malvern Hill — Advance of the Excelsior Regiments
“We reached the field; here were wounded men and the dead, but we heeded them not. We relieved the 7th New York Regiment and poured in a hot fire; still they kept the field, men falling all round, but our only thought was to fire as fast as . . . — Map (db m14927) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Ashburn — Ashburn Station
At least two different railroad stations stood where you are now standing. When the Alexandra, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad (later the W&OD) arrived in 1860, the aptly named crossroads of Farmwell became one of the many rail stops that served . . . — Map (db m20282) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Hamilton — Hamilton Station
One of the oldest on the line, Hamilton's train station dates from 1870. It was not in the original plan. When the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railway (later the Washington & Old Dominion) was established in the 1840s, its owners intended to . . . — Map (db m26961) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Lee Comes to Leesburg — Conference at Harrison Hall
On the afternoon of September 4, 1862, five days after the Confederate victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, throngs of well-wishers lined Leesburg's streets, including King Street behind you, to welcome the threadbare but jubilant Army of . . . — Map (db m42333) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Lovettsville — TA-1 — First German Reformed Church Site and Cemetery
This is the church site and cemetery of the oldest continuous German Reformed congregation in Virginia. Founded before 1748 by Elder William Wenner, the congregation met in members’ houses until the first log meetinghouse was constructed sometime . . . — Map (db m1791) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — Hibbs Bridge
Built by Uriel Glasscock in 1829 for $3,500, Hibbs Bridge replaced an 1817 wooden structure destroyed by floods in 1822. Integral to commerce along Snickers Gap Turnpike. It was called Beaverdam Bridge until 1857 when Stephen and William Hibbs . . . — Map (db m5133) HM
Virginia (Louisa County), Louisa — Netherland Tavern — Hampton's Headquarters
The Battle of Trevilian Station Fifty yards east is the site of Netherland Tavern (ca. 1822), which was demolished in the 1950s. The tavern served travelers on the Fredericksburg Stage Road and the Louisa Court House Road to the south. It also . . . — Map (db m4840) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — A Civil War Redoubt — The Manassas Museum System
This 11-acre historic park, part of the Manassas Museum System, contains one of only two surviving Civil War fortifications in the City of Manassas. The earthwork was built by Confederate troops in the Spring of 1861 as part of the Manassas Junction . . . — Map (db m2366) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — World’s First Military Railroad
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . — Map (db m2459) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Fighting on the Evening of May 5, 1864
Confederate General Leroy A. Stafford of Louisiana fell mortally wounded in this vicinity during the afternoon fighting. General Ewell, however, continued to reinforce this line, extending it farther to the north, your left. When the Federals . . . — Map (db m7382) HM
Virginia (Page County), Shenandoah — J-95 — Execution of Summers and Koontz
On 22 May 1865, after the Civil War ended, Capt. George W. Summers, Sgt. I. Newton Koontz, and two other armed veterans of Co. D, 7th Virginia Cavalry, en route to obtain their paroles, robbed six Federal cavalrymen of their horses near Woodstock. . . . — Map (db m15902) HM
Virginia, Petersburg — Campbell's Bridge — Vital Crossing — Lee's Retreat
When General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia began its retreat from Petersburg and Richmond on the evening of April 2, 1865, part of the army crossed the Appomattox River at Campbell's Bridge here. Other columns crossed the river on three . . . — Map (db m14593) HM
Virginia, Petersburg — The Siege of Petersburg
"I would not believe before I came here that man was capable of enduring so much." -Lawrence Bradley, 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery If Petersburg fell, the Confederate capital at Richmond would fall too. Grant knew it; Lee knew it. And for nine . . . — Map (db m14600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 13th New York Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Roberts), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 13th New York Infantry ("Rochester Regiment") Col. Elisha G. Marshall "The Rebel infantry poured in their volleys, and we . . . — Map (db m18310) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 73rd Ohio Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:00 p.m. 2nd Brigade (McLean), First Division (Schenk) First Corps (Sigel), Army of Virginia, USA 73rd Ohio Infantry Col. Orland Smith "The enemy in our front, moving in concert with those on our flank, came out of the . . . — Map (db m9788) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 76th New York Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. 2nd Brigade (Doubleday), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 76th New York Infantry ("Cortland County Regiment") Col. W.P. Wainwright "Waving their colors defiantly, the rebels advanced . . . — Map (db m18278) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Company B, 4th U.S. Artillery — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 6:30 p.m. 1st Division (King), Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA Company B, 4th U.S. Artillery Capt. Joseph B. Campbell Six 12-pounder Napoleons "Campbell's pieces came up on the gallop, these fences along the pike . . . — Map (db m17476) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — CL-2 — Ruffner Public School - Number 1
July 20, 1872 ————— Named for Wm. H. Ruffner, Virginia’s first superintendent of public instruction, and opened as a public school on this date. Before free public schools were established by the Virginia . . . — Map (db m2425) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Nokesville — Stony Lonesome Farm — (Belleville) — Childhood Home of General Richard S. Ewell
Nearby is the site of Stony Lonesome, childhood home of one of the Confederacy's most distinguished generals. Richard S. Ewell left this farm in 1836 to enter West Point. Graduating in 1840, Lieutenant Ewell served with the 1st U.S. Dragoons on the . . . — Map (db m21084) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Sperryville — Marys Rock Tunnel
Drill, blast, and clear. Drill, blast, and clear. For three months workers repeated this process, carving through 600 feet of solid granite (granodiorite) to complete Skyline Drive's greatest construction challenge, Marys Rock Tunnel. Twice each . . . — Map (db m13232) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), Fishers Hill — Fisher's Hill — Union Flank Attack — 1864 Valley Campaign
You are standing behind the extreme left flank of Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early's thinly stretched infantry line. At 4 p.m. on September 22, 1864, the soldiers here found themselves wrapped in a deadly pocket of Federal fire. Union Gen. Philip . . . — Map (db m4170) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), New Market — The Shirley House — A Legacy of Service
In 1875, Confederate veteran Christian Shirley constructed this brick house on the site of his family's former home, which had burned two years earlier. The Shirleys were longtime residents of Shenandoah County who had farmed their 153 ares since . . . — Map (db m7346) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Artillery Duel
On the morning of May 3, 1863, Union artillery at Fairview suffered the most intense artillery bombardment of the battle. More than 40 Confederate guns at Hazel Grove (visible 1,200 yards in front of you) concentrated their fire on 34 Union cannon . . . — Map (db m3638) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2, 1863. Having lost the Furnace, the 23rd Georgia Regiment established a new line here in the bed of the Unfinished Railroad. Other troops reinforced the position. During late afternoon, while Jackson's front lines were hitting the Federal . . . — Map (db m3906) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Flanking of Hays' Brigade
On this ridge, the Union brigade of Brig. Gen. William Hays, supported by artillery, temporarily stopped the Confederate advance across the ground below you. A member of the 12th New Jersey described what happened next: "We were in open sight, . . . — Map (db m12794) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Lives Transformed
In 1860, Oscar Bullock and his wife, Catharine, lived in a modest two-and-one-half-story white frame house on this site. With them lived their two infant children and Catharine's 16-year-old brother, David Kyle (who would serve as a guide to . . . — Map (db m3697) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Battle of Fredericksburg — Winter War on the Rappahannock
In November 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside led his 115,000-man army southward toward Richmond, the Confederate capital. Delayed by tardy pontoon boats, Burnside was slow to cross the Rappahannock River, which allowed Confederate Gen. Robert E. . . . — Map (db m21109) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Bernard's Cabins — The Battle of Fredericksburg
On this knoll stood Bernard's Cabins, a small community that in 1860 was home to about three dozen slaves. The complex consisted of three two-room cabins, a stone-lined well, and perhaps two additional buildings. This was only one of several such . . . — Map (db m7973) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Engines of Destruction — The Battle of Fredericksburg
On December 13, 1862, nine Confederate cannon on this knoll helped repulse one of two major Union attacks against Jackson's front. At noon, Union infantry crashed into the Confederate infantry line to your right-front. Captain Greenlee Davidson's . . . — Map (db m7975) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Slaughter Pen Farm — Gibbon's Advance
When Gen. George G. Meade's division surged unexpectedly forward through the fields on your left, Gen. John Gibbon's men scrambled to advance on Meade's right. Gibbon arranged his forces and ordered Gen. Nelson Taylor's brigade to attack the . . . — Map (db m21177) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — 15th Regiment New Jersey Volunteers
(Front): 1861-1865 15th Reg't N.J. Vol's. Erected by the State of New Jersey to mark the portion of the Confederate line held by the 14th Georgia Regiment. and assaulted May 12, 1864, by the 15th Regiment New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, . . . — Map (db m10313) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Hell Itself — The Battle of the Wilderness
The Wilderness of today looks different than it did in 1864. Then it was a patchwork of second-growth forest. Brush obscured, briars grabbed, and thickets disrupted the battle lines. One solder described the combat here as "bushwhacking...on a grand . . . — Map (db m7516) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — On to Richmond! — The Battle of the Wilderness
Before the Wilderness, battlefield stalemate meant retreat by one side or the other - a return to the starting point to try again another day. But not here. Union General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant rendered stalemate in the Wilderness irrelevant. On . . . — Map (db m4967) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Pressing the Attack — The Battle of Chancellorsville
That evening, as the fighting subsided, Confederate officers reassembled their commands in the clearing surrounding Wilderness Church, one-half mile in front of you. The attack had taken a heavy toll on the army's organization. Units had become . . . — Map (db m3938) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Seeing the Elephant — The 1st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery at Harris Farm — Harris Farm Battlefield Civil War Site
Union heavy artillery regiments serving as infantry shouldered the brunt of the fighting at Harris Farm. The "Heavies," as the members of the heavy artillery units were called, had been pulled from forts protecting Washington, D.C., to make up for . . . — Map (db m81309) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — The Harrison House — The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
Like most Spotsylvania County residents, Edgar W. Harrison little imagined the impact the Civil War would have on his community and his life. Harrison, his wife Ann, and their three young children lived in a story-and-a-half farmhouse set on the . . . — Map (db m10424) HM
Virginia (Warren County), Front Royal — Prospect Hill Cemetery — Jackson Prepares for Battle — Battle of Front Royal - May 23, 1862
Devoid of trees in 1862, this hill afforded Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's troops their first good look at Front Royal and the deployments of the Union garrison here. Approaching from the south on the Gooney Manor Road (now Browntown Road), . . . — Map (db m2959) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Lutheran Pioneers
To the Glory of God and in Memory of Lutheran Pioneers. Erected by members and friends of Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church Winchester, Va. 1938. These walls are the sacred ruins of the first Lutheran Church erected in Winchester - "Die teutsche . . . — Map (db m26857) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War
To honor all who served North and South April 12, 1861 to April 9, 1865 donated by Laurel Mountain Post 410 Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Belington, West Virginia March 1, 1999 — Map (db m34447) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War on the Beverly & Fairmont Turnpike
"A few dozen of us who had been swapping shots with the enemy's skirmishers, grew tired of the result less battle and by a common impulse - and I think without orders or officers, ran forward into the woods and attacked the Confederate works. We did . . . — Map (db m34456) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Nation's Armory
You are standing directly across the street from the main entrance of one of the nation's first military industrial complexes. The U.S. Armory at Harpers Ferry, now covered by an embankment of dirt and rubble, produced the deadliest weapons of its . . . — Map (db m24919) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Confederates Converge
Confederate General Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North hinged on eliminating the Harpers Ferry garrison. To do so Lee devised Special Orders 191. He divided his force of 40,000 into four parts. Three columns marched from near Frederick, . . . — Map (db m7839) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Cotton Mill
Once the largest building on Virginius Island, this 1848 four-story brick structure sported steam heat and gas lighting and boasted the latest machinery for making "yard-wide sheeting and shirting at less than Baltimore prices." The cotton mill . . . — Map (db m18812) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Five Rounds into the Darkness
The 115th New York Regiment, young and inexperienced, formed a skirmish line here. When gunfire erupted on their left during the night, the men of the 115th must have felt the rush of adrenaline through their veins. Dander was headed in their . . . — Map (db m7816) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harpers Ferry / John Brown’s Fort
(West Facing Side): Harpers Ferry Named for Robert Harper, who settled here in 1747 and operated ferry. Site purchased for Federal arsenal and armory in 1796. John Hall first used interchangeable gun parts here. Travel route thru Blue . . . — Map (db m82777) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — The Harpers Ferry Bandstand
The Harpers Ferry Town Bandstand or Gazebo was originally one of the structures on Island Park. This amusement park was created and operated by the B&O Railroad from 1879 to 1909 on Byrne Island in the Potomac River just below the Hilltop House. . . . — Map (db m2936) HM
West Virginia (Pocahontas County), Bartow — Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike — Crossing the Mountains
Early in the 1800s, growing western settlement spured a push to improve transportation routes over the Appalachian Mountains. In 1822, Virginia authorized a survey of the route that became the Staunton to Parkersburg Turnpike. Connecting the upper . . . — Map (db m32884) HM
West Virginia (Preston County), Rowlesburg — Battle of Rowlesburg: "The River Road"
You are standing less than a mile from an important battle site in the Civil War. Just ahead a handful of determined Union troops and townspeople would thwart the Confederate Raiders. Though small in scale compared to Gettysburg and Antietam, the . . . — Map (db m33988) HM
West Virginia (Randolph County), Mabie — Camp Garnett — Rich Mountain Battlefield
Confederates built Camp Garnett to block the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike. Soldiers here felled trees, dug trenches and stacked rocks for protection. Fortifications covered the hills overlooking this road, forming a fearsome obstacle for General . . . — Map (db m23615) HM

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