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Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps Marker image, Touch for more information
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps Marker
Arkansas (Washington County), Prairie Grove — General Shaver's Headquarters
During the Battle of Prairie Grove Gen. Robt. G. Shaver established his head- quarters under this tree Dec. 7, 1862 This spot marked by U.D.C. June 20, 1932. — Map (db m35332) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Fort Carroll — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865
Earthworks of Fort Carroll are visible 100 yards to the right at the top of the hill. Fort Carroll was named in honor of Maj. Gen. Samuel Sprigg Carroll, a West Point graduate from the District of Columbia. — Map (db m10614) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Fort Greble — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865
Earthworks of Fort Greble are visible beyond this exhibit. Fort Greble was named in honor of Lt. John T. Greble, slain at the Battle of Big Bethel, June 10, 1861, the first U.S. Military Academy graduate killed in the Civil War. — Map (db m40866) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — The Blair House
National Historical Marker The Blair House Purchased in 1836 by Francis P. Blair, Sr., friend of Andrew Jackson, publisher of the Washington "Globe" and the "Congressional Globe." Inherited by his son, Montgomery Blair, Attorney for Dred Scott, . . . — Map (db m23493) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — These Five-Inch Brass Trophy Guns
These five-inch brass trophy guns were captured from the Spanish Arsenal at Cavete [sic], in the Phillipine [sic] Islands on May 1, 1898, following the defeat of the Spanish Squadron in Manila Bay by the United States Navy. Admiral . . . — Map (db m71257) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Federal Triangle — 11 — From Workers to Environment — Make No Little Plans — Federal Triangle Heritage Trail
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, whose mission is to protect human health and the environment, has occupied the majority of offices in this block since 2001. EPA West (this building), the adjacent Mellon Auditorium, and the EPA East . . . — Map (db m57210) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — Bethune Museum-Archives
Mary McLeod Bethume "Council House" National Historic Site Designated October 15, 1982 by Act of Congress Born on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune was the daughter of sharecroppers. After attending Scotia Seminary in . . . — Map (db m17502) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — USS Balao (SS-285)
Battle Flag of USS BALAO [illustration] Displacement: 1,526 [tons](surfaced), 2,414 (submerged) Length: 311' 9" Draft: 16' 10" Speed: 20.25 k. (sufaced), 8.75 k. (submerged) Complement: 6 officers and 60 enlisted men Armament: . . . — Map (db m22925) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Near Northeast — 12 — Mediterranean Imports — Hub, Home, Heart — Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail
Maryland Avenue in the 1930s was home to immigrants from around the Mediterranean. Evelyn Kogok Hier grew up at 1328 Maryland Avenue. She remembered her next-door neighbor, the Right Reverend Ayoub (Job) Salloom, hosting after-church gatherings . . . — Map (db m71689) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Lock Keeper’s House
Formerly the eastern terminal of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Erected about 1835. The canal passed along the present line of B Street in front of this house emptying into Tiber Creek and the Potomac River. — Map (db m209) HM
Florida (Duval County), Jacksonville — Timucuan Friends — Fort Caroline National Monument — Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve
"[The Timucuans] brought us grains of roasted maize,... smoked lizards or other wild animals... and various kinds of roots, some for foods, others for medicine. And when they discovered that we were more interested in metals and minerals, they . . . — Map (db m46571) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — Casa Avero — St. Photios — National Greek Orthodox Shrine
Built 1749 - Restored 1979This shrine is dedicated to the memory of the 400 Greeks who arrived in St. Augustine in 1768, took on fresh supplies, then journeyed south to help settle the colony of New Smyrna, Florida. After ten difficult years, the . . . — Map (db m46789) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — Cast Iron Gun
. . . — Map (db m46814) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — F-591 — King's Road
The British laid the original route for King's Road between 1772 and 1775 in an effort to encourage settlement into this area. Extending from St. Mary's, Georgia to Andrew Turnbull's Minorcan colony at New Smyrna, King's Road intersects Palencia . . . — Map (db m47650) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — The Francis and Mary Usina Bridge
Named in honor of the St. Augustine and North Beach civic leaders, Francis E. and Mary Borum Usina. Just as the bridge spans the North River to connect the St. Augustine mainland with Vilano and North Beach, so too the Usinas were strong links . . . — Map (db m47557) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — Tolomato Indian Village
A 1737 map of the city of St. Augustine describes the site of Tolomato Cemetery as "the church and village of Tolomato, an Indian village served by Franciscan priests." The Tolomato Indians were Guale refugees fleeing attacks on their mission . . . — Map (db m47389) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Tybee Island — A Turning Point In History — The Reduction of Fort Pulaski — The Battery
This island became the "platform" on which the Union Army mounted 36 pieces of heavy artillery in early 1862. The bombardment that began on April 10 led to the surrender of Fort Pulaski 30 hours later. The placement of these batteries can be . . . — Map (db m18245) HM
Georgia (Screven County), Millhaven — 124-4 — British Army Crossing
On the morning of March 2nd, 1779, the British Command of Lieut.-Col. Prevost reached the west bank of the creek here after an all night march from Hudson's Ferry. The bridge had been destroyed by Col. Leonard Marbury's Dragons guarding the rear of . . . — Map (db m11300) HM
Indiana (Marion County), Indianapolis — 49.1995.1 — Bulgarian Orthodox Church
Original site of Saint Stephan Bulgarian Orthodox Church in 1915; relocated in 1955 to 1435 North Medford Avenue. Founded by Macedonian and Bulgarian immigrants to fulfill their religious needs and enjoyment of the traditions, customs, and . . . — Map (db m4616) HM
Kentucky (Knox County), Barbourville — 72 — First Cabin in Kentucky
Near here is site of first structure built April 1750 by a white man in Kentucky. Erected by Dr. Thomas Walker's party while exploring in the interest of the Loyal Land Company. — Map (db m35775) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Remember 1814
Fort McHenry protected the water approaches to Baltimore for more than a hundred years, but was attacked only once. On September 13-14, 1814, British ships fired rockets and mortars at the fort for twenty-five hours. Fort McHenry withstood the . . . — Map (db m10875) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — A Landscape and Lifestyle Defined by Water — Of English Origin ...
A Landscape and Lifestyle Defined by Water Dorchester County consists of 688 square miles of which approximately 1/3 is water. The extensive waterways and marshland have played a significant role in the development of the county. Only 20 miles . . . — Map (db m8349) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 4 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 4
Cox’s Division of the Ninth Corps moved from Middletown at 6 A. M., September 14, by the Frederick and Hagerstown Pike, turned to the left at Koogle’s Mill, on the Catoctin, nearly four miles southeast of this, and, marching on the old Sharpsburg . . . — Map (db m1597) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Bartlett Leads the Way
Colonel Joseph J. Bartlett, the Commander of the Second Brigade of Franklin’s First Division, found himself in a curious position. As a brigade commander, Bartlett chose both the field across which Franklin’s Corps would attack and the formation for . . . — Map (db m2151) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — General LaFayette
Friend of America and Liberty Arrived at the bridge nearby on his way to Frederick December 29, 1824 —————— Created by a delegation of citizens including the gallant Lawrence Everhart who had come to escort him . . . — Map (db m2326) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Graves, Monuments, and Memorials — of the American Civil War
In Mount Olivet Cemetery are the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers who fought in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. Near the graves is the Confederate Monument, and the Memorial to children who fought and died . . . — Map (db m2733) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Monocacy Battlefield
. . . — Map (db m3294) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Walkersville — Israel's Creek — Meeting House Cemetery
Internments dating from 1817 Plaque erected 1965 by Glade Valley Grange with cooperation of Methodist Church Walkersville, Maryland — Map (db m8649) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson House — Slavery in Rockville
Gettysburg Campaign In April 1862, Congress abolished slavery in Washington, D.C. District slaveholders were eligible for monetary compensation when they manumitted (freed) their slaves. Because the Beall sisters held several slaves who worked . . . — Map (db m5416) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Fort Lincoln
These earthworks are a portion of the original fortifications which made up Fort Lincoln. This fort was built during the summer of 1861 to serve as an outer defense of the city of Washington. It was named in honor of President Lincoln by General . . . — Map (db m46714) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Boonsboro — Lee's Headquarters — Antietam Campaign 1862
After Gen. Robert E. Lee issued Special Order 191 near Frederick dividing the Army of Northern Virginia into four columns, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command marched across South Mountain on September 10, 1862. His column . . . — Map (db m1872) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’s Crossroads — Forts Facing Forts
For the first time since the Battle of Gettysburg, most of the Union army faced Gen. Robert E. Lee on July 12, 1863. The Federals were firmly entrenched on a ridge parallel to the Sharpsburg-Hagerstown Turnpike a quarter mile west. Less than a mile . . . — Map (db m1990) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans Crossroads — Booth’s Mill Bridge
Built in 1833 by Charles Wilson for $2,700, this three-archer over Antietam Creek has spans of 45', 43' and 45'. It replaced a wooden bridge near the site of a powder mill. Also known as the Delamere Bridge, it is near the pillared mansion . . . — Map (db m1983) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "God has indeed remembered us"
At a farmhouse and barn not far from here, Clara Barton labored without sleep for three days, comforting the wounded of the Battle of Antietam with water, food, and medical supplies. Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, began her . . . — Map (db m5902) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — "Point Blank Range"
Five hundred Georgia and a few South Carolina riflemen kept the entire Union Ninth Corps on the far side of Antietam Creek for three hours. A Union general described what Northern soldiers were up against: "From the crest to bridge the slope was . . . — Map (db m6802) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 124th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
Colonel Joseph W. Hawley (Right Plaque): Sept. 17, 1862 Antietam Chancellorsville May 1-2-3, 1863 (Lower Right Inscription): Recruited in Chester and Delaware Counties August 1862 for Nine Months Service (Rear . . . — Map (db m6134) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 16th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry
(Front) Position of the 16th. Conn. Vol. Infantry 5 P.M. - Sept. 17, 1862 (Left) Number engaged - 779 Casualties Killed 43 Wounded 161 Total 204 (Rear) 16th Connecticut Vol. Infantry 2nd Brigade 3rd Division 9th Army Corps . . . — Map (db m7113) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 50th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
1st Brigade 1st Division 9th Corps Colonel Benjamin C. Christ ————— Casualties at Antietam Killed 8 Wounded 46 Missing 3 Total 57 Recruited in Berks Schuylkill Bradford Susquehanna Lancaster and Luzerne Counties . . . — Map (db m6495) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 368 — D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command
C.S.A. D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command. Brig. Gen. D.R. Jones, Commanding. Organization. Brig. Gen. Robert Toombs' Brigade, Brig. Gen. Thomas F. Drayton's Brigade, Brig. Gen. R. B. Garnett's Brigade, Brig. Gen. James L. Kemper's . . . — Map (db m6595) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 2 — Doubleday's Division, First Army Corps
U.S.A. Doubleday's Division, First Army Corps, Brigadier Gen. Abner Doubleday, Commanding. (September 17, 1862.)Doubleday's Division, on the right of the First Corps, moved to the attack at 5/30 a.m., September 17, in the following order: . . . — Map (db m6127) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — First Methodist Cemetery
The First Methodist Church in Sharpsburg acquired this property in 1819 and built a small, brick church here. The first burial was in 1828. This church was torn down when the congregation built a new church at 125 West Main Street in 1857. — Map (db m7338) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 310 — Hood's Division, Longstreet's Command
C.S.A. Hood's Division, Longstreet's Command, Brigadier General John B. Hood, Commanding. (September 17, 1862.) About 7 a.m. of the 17th, Hood's Division moved out of the woods surrounding the Dunkard Church, crossed the Hagerstown Pike a few . . . — Map (db m5659) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 353 — Jackson's Command — Branch's Brigade, Hill's Light Division
C.S.A. Branch's Brigade, Hill's Light Division, Brig. Gen. L. O'B. Branch. Organization. 7th North Carolina Infantry, 18th North Carolina Infantry, 28th North Carolina Infantry, 33d North Carolina Infantry, 37th North Carolina Infantry. . . . — Map (db m6763) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 335 — Jackson's Command — Winder's Brigade, Jackson's Division
C.S.A. Jackson's Command Winder's Brigade, Jackson's Division Col. A.J. Grigsby, 27th Virginia Infantry, Commanding. Organization. 2d Virginia Infantry 4th Virginia Infantry 5th Virginia Infantry 27th Virginia Infantry 33d Virginia Infantry . . . — Map (db m10982) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 329 — Longstreet's Command — Law's Brigade, Hood's Division
C.S.A. Longstreet's Command. Law's Brigade, Hood's Division. Col. E.M. Law, 4th Alabama Infantry, Commanding. Organization. 4th Alabama Infantry, 6th North Carolina Infantry, 2nd Mississippi Infantry, 11th Mississippi Infantry. September 16, . . . — Map (db m5811) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 328 — Longstreet's Command — Anderson's Brigade, D.R. Jones' Division
C.S.A. Longstreet's Command. Anderson's Brigade, D.R. Jones' Division. Col. George T. Anderson, 11th Georgia Infantry, Commanding. Organization. 1st Georgia Infantry (Regulars.) 7th Georgia Infantry, 8th Georgia Infantry, 9th Georgia Infantry, . . . — Map (db m7256) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Mumma Farm Lane
This portion of the historic Mumma Farm Lane looked much the same in 1862. Confederate soldiers burned the farm buildings to prevent their use by Federal sharpshooters. Only the white-washed stone springhouse (on the left) survived as does this . . . — Map (db m6981) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 44 — Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps
U.S.A. Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps, Maj. Gen. Israel B. Richardson, commanding September 17, 1862. Richardson's Division crossed the Antietam at Pry's Ford about 9:30 a.m. and advanced to the ravine behind the high ground . . . — Map (db m5502) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — Second Regiment — U.S. Sharpshooters
Sept. 17, 1862 Company E, Capt. Homer R. Stoughton ————— Company H. Lieut. Albert Buxton Vermont — Map (db m5816) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 120 — September 17, 1862
The Battle opened at daylight between Hooker's Corps and the Confederate divisions of Jackson and Ewell and raged in the East Woods, in Miller's Cornfield and on either side of the Hagerstown Pike about one third of a mile north of the Dunkard . . . — Map (db m5577) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 58 — Sturgis's Division, Ninth Army Corps
U.S.A. Sturgis' Division, Ninth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Samuel G. Sturgis, Commanding. September 17, 1862. On the night of September 16th, Sturgis' Division bivouacked on the eastern slope of the ridge bordering the east bank of the Anitetam to . . . — Map (db m6445) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 49 — Twelfth Army Corps — Stainrook's Brigade, Greene's Division
U.S.A. Twelfth Army Corps. Stainrook's Brigade, Greene's Division. Col. Henry J. Stainrook, 109th Penn. Inf., Commanding. Organization. 3d Maryland Infantry, 102d New York Infantry, 111th Pennsylvania Infantry. September 17, 1862. Stainrook's . . . — Map (db m5995) HM
Missouri (Dunklin County), Kennett — Kennett
(Front): Here in the Southeast Lowland Region of Missouri on a Delaware and Shawnee Indian village site, Kennett was laid out as the seat of Dunklin County, 1846. The town was first called Chilletecaux for a Delaware Indian living here at the . . . — Map (db m17477) HM
New York (Chemung County), Elmira — Divided Peoples
The Revolutionary War divided communities and shattered ancient alliances. Along New York's frontier, simmering rivalries among settlers of European descent boiled over with threats and violent clashes. Many who remained loyal to King George III . . . — Map (db m33553) HM
North Carolina (Carteret County), Atlantic Beach — Model 1861 10-inch Siege Mortars
These are the only known surviving cannons of Fort Macon's original armament. Used in the fort 1862 to 1902. Similar to mortars used by the Union Army against the fort in the 1862 bombardment. Weight of Barrel .......................... 1968 Pounds . . . — Map (db m31490) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — C 64 — James City
Community founded here in 1863 as resettlement camp for freed slaves. Named for Horace James. Union Army chaplain. — Map (db m31206) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — E 95 — John Spencer Bassett — 1867 - 1928
Historian. Professor at Trinity College, 1894-1906. Secretary, Amer. Historical Association, 1919-1928. Born here. — Map (db m31106) HM
North Carolina (Greene County), Snow Hill — Grimsley Baptist Church — Rest, Feed, and Forage — Potter's Raid
(Preface): On July 18, 1863 Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and retreated to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m31170) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Enfield — E 79 — Henry B. Bradford — 1761 - 1833
Early Methodist Protestant minister; educator; and soldier in the Revolution. Founded Bradford's Church on this site circa 1792. — Map (db m31070) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 15 — Ram Neuse
Confederate Ironclad, built at Whitehall and floated down the Neuse. Grounded and burned by Confederates in 1865. Remains are 250 yds. S. — Map (db m30420) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 11 — Sherman's March
Sherman's Army, on its march from Savannah, entered Goldsboro, its chief North Carolina objective, Mar. 21, 1865. — Map (db m31556) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Fairfield — Jones's Brigade — Stuart's Cavalry Division — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Stuart's Cavalry Division Jones's Brigade 6th. 7th. 11th. 12th. Cavalry Regiments and 35th. Virginia Cavalry BattalionJuly 1 The 12th. Regiment was detached and remained on the south side of the Potomac River. White's . . . — Map (db m27033) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 147th New York Infantry — (Position Marker)
147 N.Y. Inf'y July 2d & 3d 1863 — Map (db m13958) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 147th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers
(Front):147th Regiment Infantry Pennsylvania Veteran Vols. Night of July 1 1863. (Back):1st Brigade 2nd Division 12th Army Corps — Map (db m15044) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 151st Pennsylvania Infantry — 1st Brigade, 3rd Division — 1st Corps
(Front):151st Pennsylvania Infantry July 1st fought here and in the grove west of the Theological Seminary July 2, in reserve on Cemetery Hill July 3, in position on left centre and assisted in repulsing the charge of the enemy in the . . . — Map (db m15244) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 15th and 50th New York Engineers
(Front):15th and 50th New York Engineers Head-quarters A.P. (Right):15th New York Engineers. Mustered in June 17th, 1861. Mustered out July 2nd, 1865. Participated in all the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Ending at Appomattox. . . . — Map (db m15953) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry — 1st Brigade 3d Division — Cavalry Corps
(front):18th Pennsylvania Cavalry 1st Brigade 3d Division Cavalry Corps Army of the Potomac (rear): The regiment participated in the cavalry fights at Hanover June 30th and Hunterstown July 2nd 1863. On July 3d occupied this position . . . — Map (db m14969) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 19th Indiana Infantry Regiment
(Front):July 1, 1863. ———— 1st Corps Gen. J.F. Reynolds, Killed 1st Div. Gen. J.S. Wadsworth. 1st Brig. [Iron] Gen. S. Meredith, Wounded ———— Iron Brigade 2th, 6th, & 7th Wis. 19th Ind. & 24th . . . — Map (db m12661) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 28th Pennsylvania Infantry — 1st Brigade, 2nd Division — 12th Corps
(Front):28th Penna. Infantry 1st Brig. 2nd Div. 12th Corps. July 3rd 1863. (Back): Mustered in June 28th 1861. Re-enlisted December 22d 1863. Mustered out July 18th 1865. Arrived at 3 p.m. July 1st and went into position on the ridge . . . — Map (db m13983) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 29th Ohio Infantry — 1st Brigade, 2nd Division — 12th Corps
(Front):29th Ohio Infantry 1st Brig. 2nd Div. 12th Corps. This memorial is erected by the State of Ohio (Left):Gettysburg July 2d and 3d 1863 Engaged 332 - Killed 7 Wounded 31 - 2 mortally Total loss 38 (Back):Principal Battles . . . — Map (db m13947) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 61st Ohio Infantry — 1st Brigade, 3rd Division — 11th Corps
(Front):The 61st Ohio Infantry ———On arriving from Emmittsburg about one o'clock p.m., July 1st 1863, was deployed as skirmish line in advance of its Brigade and moved towards Oak Hill. Later it supported as section of . . . — Map (db m11132) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry
(Front Top):6th. Penna. Cavly. Lancers Reserve Brigade 1st Division Cavalry Corps Army of the Potomac (Front Base):Gettysburg July 3, 1863. Number engaged 365 Killed 3. Wounded 7. Missing 2. (Right Base): Mustered in Oct. 31st. . . . — Map (db m13447) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 7th West Virginia Infantry
7th West Virginia Infantry July 3, 1863. — Map (db m17173) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
7th Wis. Vol. Inf't. July 2nd & 3rd 1863 — Map (db m17273) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — 8th New Jersey Volunteers — 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division — 3rd Corps
(Front):8th New Jersey Volunteers Col. John Ramsay 3d Brig. [Burling's] 2d Div. 3d Corps Erected by the State of New Jersey 1888 (Left):Engaged here July 2, 1863. Being detached from the Brigade. Supported batteries on Cemetery Ridge . . . — Map (db m15644) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Archer's Brigade — Heth's Division - Hill's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Hill's Corps Heth's Division Archer's Brigade 5th. Battalion and 13th. Alabama 1st. 7th. 14th. Tennessee Infantry July 1 The Brigade moved from Cashtown early in the morning toward Gettysburg. After a march of . . . — Map (db m12643) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Army of Northern Virginia — June 26, 1863
Headquarters of the Army with Hood's Division Longstreet's Corps crossed the Potomac at Williamsport Md. and marched to Greencastle Penna. McLaw's Division Longstreet's Corps crossed the river and encamped near Williamsport. Pickett's Division . . . — Map (db m11768) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Army of Northern Virginia — June 29, 1863
Heth's Division Hill's Corps marched from Fayetteville to Cahstown. Pender's and Anderson's Divisions remaining at Fayetteville. Johnson's Division Ewell's Corps countermarched from Carlisle to Greenville Penna. Rodes's Division Ewell's Corps . . . — Map (db m11825) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Batteries F & K, Third U.S. Artillery — First Regular Brigade - Artillery Reserve — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Artillery Reserve First Regular Brigade Batteries F& K Third U.S. Artillery Six 12 pounders Lieut. John C. Turnbull Commanding July 1 Took position on crest of hill near General Meade's Headquarters. July 2 Moved to a . . . — Map (db m14842) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Battery C, Massachusetts Light Artillery — Artillery Reserve - Fifth Corps — Army of the Potomac
. . . — Map (db m13404) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Battery H, 3d Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery
Battery H 3d Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery 1st Brigade 2d Division Cavalry Corps Mounted as a battery of light artillery May 6 1863 Second Section Participated in the Battle Mustered in January 19 1863 Mustered out July 25, 1865 Temporarily . . . — Map (db m9471) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Brigadier General Samuel Wiley Crawford
Brig. General Samuel Wiley Crawford Commander of the Pennsylvania Reserves 1829 - 1892 — Map (db m15755) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — First Massachusetts Infantry — First Brigade, Second Division — Third Corps
(Front):First Mass. Infantry (Back):On July 2, 1863 from 11 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. the First Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. Clark B. Baldwin commanding, occupied this spot in support of its skirmish line 800 feet . . . — Map (db m17323) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — First Regiment Vermont Cavalry — First Brigade, Third Division — Cavalry Corps
(Front):First Regiment Vermont Cavalry, First Brig. Third Div. Cavalry Corps. In the Gettysburg Campaign this regiment fought Stuart's Cavalry at Hanover, Pa. June 30, and at Hunterstown July 2; and on this field July 3, led by Gen. Elon J. . . . — Map (db m15512) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Fourteenth U.S. Infantry — First Brigade - Second Division - Fifth Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Fifth Corps Second Division First Brigade Fourteenth U.S. Infantry Eight Companies Captain Crotius R. Giddings Commanding July 2 Arrived in the morning and took position with the Brigade and Division near the Twelfth Corps on . . . — Map (db m15112) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Fourth Alabama Infantry - Law's Brigade — Hood's Division - Longstreet's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet's Corps Hood's Division Law's Brigade Fourth Alabama Infantry July 2 Left New Guilford 25 miles distant at 3 a.m. arrived here and formed line about 4 p.m. and under fire from Smith's Union Battery on rocky . . . — Map (db m15494) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association
This land and other portions of this battleground, fought over by brave men of a nation divided, is now part of Gettysburg National Military Park, through the agency of the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association and the collective . . . — Map (db m17984) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Gettysburg Campaign
On July 4, 1863, the Confederate Army began an orderly retreat by the Fairfield Road to the Potomac. They began crossing the river on the night of July 13, after a delay caused by high water. — Map (db m10789) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Headquarters of Brigadier General Henry Hunt
Headquarters of Brig-General Henry J. Hunt Chief of Artillery Army of the Potomac July 2,3,4,5, 1863 — Map (db m16030) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Hoke's Brigade — Early's Division - Ewell's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Ewell's Corps Early's Division Hoke's Brigade 6th. 21st. 57th. North Carolina Infantry July 1 Advanced at 3 p.m. with Hays's Brigade flanked Eleventh Corps aided in taking two guns repulsed First Brigade Second . . . — Map (db m13522) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Hurt's Battery - McIntosh's Battalion — Artillery Reserve - Hill's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Hill's Corps Artillery Reserve McIntosh's Battalion Hurt's Battery Hardaway Alabama Artillery Two Whitworths and Two 3 inch Rifles July 1 The Whitworths were in position near Chambersburg Pike west of Herr's Tavern and . . . — Map (db m11843) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — O'Neal's Brigade — Rodes's Division - Ewell's Corps — Army of Northern Virginia
C.S.A. Army of Northern Virginia Ewell's Corps Rodes's Division O'Neal's Brigade 3rd. 5th. 6th. 12th. 26th. Alabama Infantry July 3 After taking part in the battles of the First and Second Days elsewhere on the field the Brigades leaving the 5th . . . — Map (db m13547) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Oneida New York Cavalry
Oneida New York Cavalry General Meade's escort and Headquarters' orderlies and couriers Army of the Potomac July 2 and 3 1863 — Map (db m14483) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second Brigade — First Division - Third Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Third Corps First Division Second Brigade Brig. Gen. J. H. Hobart Ward Col. Hiram Berdan 20th Indiana, 3d. 4th. Maine 86th. 124th. New York, 99th Penna Infantry 1st, 2d, (8 cos.) U.S. SharpshootersJuly 1 Arrived after sunset . . . — Map (db m15051) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second Division — Cavalry Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Cavalry Corps Second Division Brig. General David McM. Gregg First Brigade Col. John B. McIntosh Second Brigade Col Pennock Huey Third Brigade Col. J. Irvin Gregg July 2 Gen. Gregg with two Brigades left Hanover and took . . . — Map (db m9296) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Second Division — Third Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Third Corps Second Division Brig. General Andrew A. Humphreys First Brigade Brig. Gen. Joseph B. Carr Second Brigade Col. William R. Brewster Third Brigade Col. George C. Burling July 2. Arrived about 1 a.m. and bivouacked . . . — Map (db m17366) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Seventh U.S. Infantry — Second Brigade - Second Division — Fifth Corps
Army of the Potomac Fifth Corps Second Division Second Brigade Seventh U.S. Infantry Four Companies Captain David R. Hancock commanding July 2 Arrived in the morning and took position with the Brigade on the right of the Twelfth Corps. Later . . . — Map (db m15587) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — The Stoever - Schick Building
During the Battle of Gettysburg this Federal style building, erected in 1817, housed Professor Martin Stoever's family and J.L. Schick's general store. As a result of the battle the building hosted a variety of unusual events. Shortly after the . . . — Map (db m18127) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Third Army Corps — Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill — Army of Northern Virginia
Army of Northern Virginia Third Army Corps Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill Anderson's Division Major General R.H. Anderson Heth's Division Major General Henry Heth, Brigadier General J.J. Pettigrew Pender's Division Major General William D. . . . — Map (db m11525) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Third Brigade — Second Division - Twelfth Corps — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac Twelfth Corps Second Division Third Brigade Brig. Gen. George S. Greene 60th. 78th. 102d. 137th. 149th. New York Infantry July 1 Arrived about 5 p.m. and took position on the left of the First Corps on Cemetery Ridge. July 2 . . . — Map (db m13997) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — Union Collapse at Barlow Knoll — July 1, 1863 - First Day
"P.S. Tell them I was hit face toward them - no Reb saw my back." Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman, U.S.A. 17th Connecticut Infantry, Eleventh Corps Battlefield letter to his mother On July 1, 1863, Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard positioned two divisions of his . . . — Map (db m11375) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Gettysburg — United States Battalion of Engineers — Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac United States Battalion of Engineers Captain George H. Mendell commanding With the Army of the Potomac in the Gettysburg Campaign from the Rappahannock to the Potomac and engaged in arduous duties from June 13th to July 18th . . . — Map (db m15955) HM
Pennsylvania (Centre County), Bellefonte — Pennsylvania Match Factory
One of the nation's leading producers of wooden matches during the first half of the 20th century; founded 1899 by Bellefonte entrepreneurs. The factory buildings opened in 1900, using the vast resources of the surrounding lumber region. By World . . . — Map (db m19588) HM
Pennsylvania (Franklin County), Fayetteville — Caledonia Furnace
Erected in 1837 by Thaddeus Stevens and James D. Paxton. Stevens' antislavery stand led to its destruction by Gen. Jubal Early, June 26, 1863, on his way to York during the early Gettysburg campaign. — Map (db m11618) HM
Pennsylvania (Lackawanna County), Scranton — Supplying the Blast
By 1850, the application of steam power to the manufacture of goods was well established. Not only did the steam engine produce sufficient amounts of relatively stable power, but it freed industry from location along waterways. Two double connected . . . — Map (db m10571) HM
Pennsylvania (Lebanon County), Fort Indiantown Gap — Fallen Warrior Memorial - 2nd BCT — Fallen Warrior Memorial Symbolism
Fallen Warrior Memorial 2nd BCT The 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division (2/28 BCT), Pennsylvania Army National Guard, was mobilized January 2005 to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. Known as the "IRON BRIGADE," it marked the . . . — Map (db m12543) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Battery Huger
Battery Huger (ũ-jẽ) looms before you. Battery Huger, the black, concrete structure filling the center of Fort Sumter, was built in 1899 in response to the Spanish-American War. Named for Revolutionary War hero Isaac Huger, the battery . . . — Map (db m30552) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Powder Magazine
Fort Sumter's powder was stored in these specially constructed rooms in the corner (angle) of the gorge wall. Protecting gunpowder was critical; the gorge, at the rear of the fort, was considered a safe location. But Fort Sumter was designed to face . . . — Map (db m30920) HM
Tennessee (Fayette County), Moscow — 4E 162 — Battle of Moscow / Union Troops of African Descent
(Front):Battle of Moscow December 4, 1863 Three thousand Confederate cavalry with artillery, led by Gen. James Chalmers, attacked the Memphis & Charleston Railroad bridge over Wolf River and ambushed Col. Edward Hatch's brigade of Union . . . — Map (db m81524) HM
Tennessee (Hamblen County), Russellville — 1B 30 — Longstreet's Billet
Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's Corps occupied this area during the winter of 1863-64, with the mission of securing east Tennessee to the Confederacy. He and his staff occupied this house at that time. Brig. Gen. Kershaw's troops were to the north of . . . — Map (db m22671) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 322 — 33d Tennessee Infantry — Stewart's Brigade - Clark's Division - Polk's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
. . . — Map (db m22975) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 58th Illinois Infantry — Sweeny's Brigade - W.H.L. Wallace's Division — Army of the Tennessee
(Front):Illinois 58th Infantry 3d Brigade - Sweeny 2d Division - W.H.L. Wallace Army of the Tennessee (Back):58th Infantry Commanded by Col. Wm. F. Lynch This Regiment held this line with slight changes of position from about 9:00 a.m. . . . — Map (db m39183) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 433 — Bate's 2nd Tennessee Infantry — Cleburne's Division - Hardee's Corps — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. Army of the Mississippi. Bate's (2d) Tenn. Infantry, Cleburne's (2d) Brigade, Hardee's Corps. This Regiment was engaged here on Monday April 7, 1862 until about 1 p.m. — Map (db m22932) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 380 — Crescent (La.) Regiment — Pond's Brigade - Ruggles' Division — Army of the Mississippi
C.S. Army of the Mississippi. Crescent (La.) Regiment, Pond's (3d) Brigade, Ruggles' (1st) Division, Bragg's Corps. This Regiment was engaged here Monday April 7, 1862 supporting Washington (La.) Artillery, it recovered the guns of that battery . . . — Map (db m22405) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — 163 — Lauman's Brigade — Hurlbut's Division — Army of the Tennessee
U.S. Lauman's (3d) Brigade, 17th Ky., 25th Ky., 44th Ind., 31st Ind., Hurlbut's (4th) Division, Army of the Tennessee. This Brigade, with its regiments in order from left to right as above, formed . . . — Map (db m21610) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — Shiloh Church
The Battle of Shiloh takes its name from a Methodist log church that stood here during the battle. On the morning of Sunday, April 6, 1862, the church and cemetery grounds became the scene of fierce fighting as Confederates attacked Union forces . . . — Map (db m21939) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Shiloh — Stuart — Brigade Heaquarters Monument
U. S. Headquarters, 2d Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee. Col. David Stuart, 55th Illinois, Commanding. Established March 19, 1862. — Map (db m22596) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Battlefield Overview
You are standing, more or less, on the old Lexington-Huntingdon Road. Behind you is the reconstructed split-rail fence, where the Union troops took position and faced General Nathan Bedford Forrest's unrelenting artillery assault and surprise attack . . . — Map (db m20542) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — Battle of Appomattox Station — Final Blow — Lee's Retreat
You are standing near the site of Appomattox Station Depot on the South Side Railroad. Here, on the afternoon of April 8, 1865, Union cavalrymen under Gen. George A. Custer dealt the Army of Northern Virginia a final blow. First, they captured . . . — Map (db m3837) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Battle of Appomattox Station — April 8, 1865: 4-8 p.m.
One of the last battles of the Civil War took place one mile west of here. After capturing Confederate supplies, General George Custer's cavalry charged through the woods into the cannon fire of Confederate General Reuben Lindsay Walker's troops. . . . — Map (db m30041) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Confederates Trapped — Appomattox Court House Nat’l Hist Park
For most of the war, Lee and his army had tormented their Northern enemies – at Gaines’ Mill, Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. But here, on April 9, 1865, the once-mighty Army of Northern Virginia found itself trapped. Lee faced . . . — Map (db m15526) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Final Combat
“It seems to me every one was more scared than ever, from the fact that we knew the war was nearly over, and we did not want to be killed at the end of the war.” Private John L. Smith, 118th Pennsylvania Late on the morning of . . . — Map (db m5970) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee's Apple Tree
Near this spot stood the apple tree under which General Robert E. Lee rested while awaiting the return of a flag of truce sent by him to General U.S. Grant on the morning of April 9, 1865. — Map (db m30077) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Wartime Landscape
The road trace in front of you is the remnant of the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road – on April 9, 1865, the most important road in Virginia to Robert E. Lee. Along this road he planned to escape west, hoping eventually to turn south and join . . . — Map (db m5984) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Cherrydale
In 1893 a branch post office at Lee Highway and Pollard Street was named Cherrydale, with reference to Dorsey Donaldson’s large cherry orchard in back of the present firehouse. Quincy Street was then known as Cherry Valley Road. Settlement in this . . . — Map (db m55731) HM
Virginia (Bath County), Warm Springs — The Turnpike Movement in Virginia, 1825-1835
The end of the eighteenth century saw Virginia change from an agriculture-based society to one of urban centers. Once British trade restrictions were removed after the War of 1812, river ports such as Alexandria, Fredericksburg, and Richmond began . . . — Map (db m34264) HM
Virginia (Bath County), Warm Springs — The Virginia Springs Resorts
Although turnpikes were built primarily to facilitate trade, many routes within western Virginia were improved to support recreation. Warm Springs Mountain Turnpike provided access to the Warm Springs and Hot Springs area, home of natural mineral . . . — Map (db m34289) HM
Virginia (Buckingham County), Pleasant Valley — O 38 — Millbrook — Home of John Wayles Eppes
Approximately 2 miles east stood Millbrook (1811-1866), home of U.S. Senator John Wayles Eppes (1773-1823). He attended the University of Pennsylvania, was graduated from Hampden-Sydney College, and was admitted to the Bar in 1794. He married Maria, . . . — Map (db m28305) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Bellona Foundry
Gun and gun mold recovered by C. Merle Luck from the James River on August 18, 1962 having been put there during Col. Dahlgren's Raid during the Civil War. — Map (db m40598) HM
Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T 10 — Crook and Early
Early, while passing through this gap on his return from his Washington raid, was attacked by Crook’s cavalry, July 16, 1864. Crook destroyed a few wagons, Early captured a cannon. — Map (db m1204) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Brandy Station — The Battle of Brandy Station — Surprises at the Crossing
Rivers and river crossings played an important role in many Civil War battles, including the Battle of Brandy Station. A mile northwest of this spot is the site of Beverly Ford, where the cavalry of both the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and . . . — Map (db m4405) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Culpeper — Culpeper Court House — Battle of Culpeper Court House
Following the Gettysburg Campaign, Federal officials sought to verify rumors that a substantial part of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Confederate army had been detached. On September 13, 1863, Federal cavalry moved down the tracks from your left, under . . . — Map (db m8417) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Culpeper — The Battle of Cedar Mountain — The Awkward Position of the 21st Virginia
Without the leadership of either Generals Jackson or Winder, subordinate officers formed their men along the edge of woodlines where the ground offered a better field of fire. The men of the 21st Virginia were positioned here just inside the . . . — Map (db m4448) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Culpeper — The Civil War
Four long years of bitter Civil War devastated Culpeper more than any other community in the country. Savage battles at Cedar Mountain, Kelly's Ford and Brandy Station left thousands of young Americans dead and wounded, and Culpeper's homes, . . . — Map (db m12779) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Rixeyville — G-9 — Little Fork Church
One-half mile east stands Little Fork Espiscopal Church, begun 1753, destroyed by fire in 1773. Present structure completed in 1776. — Map (db m2683) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Birth of a River
Nearly 12,000 years ago, the Potomac River was formed as a result of the final glacial episode of the Pleistocene Epoch. At that time, the Potomac River was little more than a tributary of the Susquehanna River. A variety of large animals known as . . . — Map (db m35064) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Great Falls — Rowser's Ford — 5,000 Confederate Cavalrymen Crossed — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsvile in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into . . . — Map (db m59675) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Mount Vernon — E 67 — Doeg Indians
A group of Virginia Indians referred to as the Doeg (but also Dogue, Taux, and other names) occupied villages and settlements along the Potomac and Occoquan Rivers by 1607. They included Tauxenent, near the mouth of the Occoquan River, Namasingakent . . . — Map (db m32063) HM
Virginia, Falls Church — West Falls Church Station
In 1912, from the station that stood nearby to your right, you could board a modern interuban passenger coach at 7:34 a.m. and arrive in Georgetown by 8:00 sharp. It was a new century and Washington, D.C., was on the move. The demand was heavy in . . . — Map (db m2901) HM
Virginia (Fluvanna County), Fork Union — GA-33 — Fork Union Academy
First classes of Fork Union Academy were held here October 15, 1898 in the residence of Susie Payne Cooper. Established as a co-educational English and classical school, it became Fork Union Military Academy for boys in 1903. Organized by 10 . . . — Map (db m12329) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Z 179 — Frederick County / Shenandoah County
(South Facing Side): Frederick County Area 485 Square Miles Formed in 1738 from Orange, and named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, Father of King George III. Several battles were fought in the vicinity of Winchester, 1862-1864. (North . . . — Map (db m3430) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Stephenson — Jordan Springs — Healing Springs
During the Civil War, both United States and Confederate forces used Jordan Springs resort as a hospital at different times. Wounded and sick Confederate soldiers from the Antietam and Gettysburg battlefields came to the springs—although . . . — Map (db m2358) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Battle of Kernstown — March 23, 1862
General James Shields with 7,000 Federals defeated Stonewall Jackson with 3,500 Confederates. Jackson's object was to create a diversion which would prevent troops being sent to McClellan for the attack on Richmond. He arrived south of Kernstown in . . . — Map (db m33024) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — J 16 — Defenses of Winchester
The fort on the hilltop to the north is one of a chain of defenses commanding the crossings of the Opequon. It was constructed by Milroy in 1863. — Map (db m80324) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Q 4a — General Daniel Morgan / Winchester
(North Side): Morgan used this road in traveling from his home, “Saratoga,” to Winchester. He was a frontiersman, Indian fighter and the commander of Morgan’s famous riflemen in the Revolution. He won glory at Quebec and Saratoga, . . . — Map (db m2290) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Lt. Collier’s Earthworks
From the time of Virginia’s secession from the Union on May 23, 1861, until just before the Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861, the Confederate government in Richmond recognized the importance of defending the Lower Shenandoah Valley. When . . . — Map (db m2494) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Third Battle of Winchester — The Confederates Reform
"Unless this force were driven back, the day was lost." General Jubal A. Early, C.S.A. Standing here about noon during the battle, you would have seen Union troops under Gen. Henry Birge pursuing Gen. Clement Evans' Georgians from right . . . — Map (db m3187) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Col. Joseph A. Moesch — 83rd New York Volunteers — Ninth Regiment New York State Militia
(Front): In memory of Col. Joseph A. Moesch Killed at the Wilderness May 6, 1864 ——— Erected by Surviving Comrades (Rear): 83rd N.Y. Vol's ——— Ninth Regiment N.Y.S.M. -- N.G.S.N.Y. 2nd Brig. 2nd . . . — Map (db m9092) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The “Demon of Destruction”
Had the demon of destruction held an orgie in the town, had all the imps of hell been called together and turned loose upon the city, it could scarcely have been more blasted, ruined and desecrated than when left by the Yankee army.” . . . — Map (db m2576) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Glendale — Advantages of Terrain
Today, heavy woods have replaced the vast rolling wheat fields upon which the armies fought. Timber also hides the steep slopes and jagged ravines that shielded the flanks of the Union position. The rough terrain forced most of the Confederates to . . . — Map (db m29441) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Glendale — Battlefield Landscape
Photographs taken during and shortly after the war help us to understand, preserve and rehabilitate the battlefield landscape. In the 1880’s a photographer recorded a series of views of Malvern Hill to accompany Civil War articles published in . . . — Map (db m15201) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — Defending Richmond
"The fortifications constructed by the Confederate army in this vicinity & about Richmond are miles in extent & I must add that they are as strong, if not the strongestin the world." - Julian Scott, Union Army Veteran May 1865 From the war's . . . — Map (db m55720) HM
Virginia (Lee County), Stickleyville — K 5 — Fanny Dickenson Scott Johnson
In this valley in June 1785, Fanny Dickenson Scott's husband, Archibald Scott, their four children and a young male member of the nearby Ball family were killed by members of four different Indian tribes. The rest of the Ball family escaped, but . . . — Map (db m35982) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Dover — B 22 — Cavalry Battles
In June 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia through gaps in the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains and into the Shenandoah Valley to invade the North. Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry corps screened the army from Federal . . . — Map (db m1454) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County
On April 12, 1861, with the firing on Fort Sumter, America went to war with itself. Just as the country was divided, so were Virginia and Loudoun County. The western portion of Virginia became the separate state of West Virginia in 1863. Here in . . . — Map (db m2251) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Sterling — Lanesville Outbuildings
Homes in the 19th century typically had several outbuildings. Barns stabled horses and other animals, tenant houses lodged farm hands, wells supplied water, and, of course, the "necessary," or outhouse, was a must. One of the most significant . . . — Map (db m20124) HM
Virginia (Madison County), Criglersville — Visiblity-Endangered?
On a good visibility day, Stony Man Mountain and nearby hills may be seen cleary with the human eye. On a poor visibility day, both natural conditions and air pollution obscures your view of Stony Man Mountain and distant views beyond. The Blue . . . — Map (db m13240) HM
Virginia (Madison County), Syria — National Park Service CCC Camps
Six Civilian Conservation Corps camps in the area which became Shenandoah National Park were at Big Meadows, Skyland, Pinnacles, Piney River, Baldface, and Dundo from 1933 to 1942. Camp Fechner, near here, was named in honor of Robert Fechner, . . . — Map (db m13247) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Lake of the Woods — Gordon's Flank Attack — Battle of the Wilderness
Before Sunset on May 6, 1864 From this site, you would have seen Confederate Brig. Gen. John B. Gordon quietly assembled ten regiments between here and the woods, across the lake, at Madison Cir. In those woods, Union Brig. Gen. T. Seymour had . . . — Map (db m65280) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Collision of Giants — Wilderness Exhibit Shelter — North Wall
Collision of Giants By 1864 the war had become not just a clash of armies, but of ideas. To be resolved on the fields of Virginia and Georgia that year was not only the fate of the Union, but also the fate of Southern society. The armies on both . . . — Map (db m6077) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — The Confederate Line — The Battle of the Wilderness
Dick Ewell was raring for a fight. When a subordinate approached him early on May 5, 1864, and asked Ewell about his orders, the balding, pop-eyed general piped up cheerily: "... Just the orders I like - to go right down the [turnpike] and strike . . . — Map (db m72886) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — JJ 26 — Gilmore Farm
George Gilmore was born into slavery at Montpelier about 1810. Like millions of African Americans throughout the South, Gilmore made the transition to freedom after the Civil War. Many emancipated slaves worked on the same plantation where they once . . . — Map (db m23986) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — Homes for Enslaved Families — c. 1820s
Slaves who worked in the Madison's household lived in this nearby area known as the "south yard." The yards of these homes, where most of the household activities took place, were in direct sight of the mansion. As a result, the Madisons would have . . . — Map (db m23968) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 22 — Madison Farm Complex — 1760s - 1840s
In the fields in front of you, archaeologists have found the extremely well-preserved remains of James Madison's plantation farm complex, which served as the hub of the working farm and the home for several generations of field slaves. This complex, . . . — Map (db m24050) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Orange — JJ 6 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Two miles north, near Pisgah Church, Jackson, Ewell and A.P. Hill camped, August 15-20, 1862 — Map (db m4698) HM
Virginia (Page County), Grove Hill — Somerville Heights — A "most terrific fire from the enemy" — 1862 Valley Campaign
Early in May 1862, Gen. Stonewall Jackson moved most of his army east over the Blue Ridge toward Charlottesville, leaving Gen. Richard S. Ewell's division at Conrad's Store (present day Elkton) to hold the Federals in the Shenandoah Valley. The . . . — Map (db m12086) HM
Virginia, Petersburg — Battery 5 Trail
On the ground before you the first major attacks against Petersburg occurred. This bloodletting marked the beginning of nine months of siege. This 0.6-mile trail will take you through Battery 5 of the Confederate Dimmock Line, captured by the . . . — Map (db m14601) HM
Virginia (Prince Edward County), Rice — F 73 — High Bridge
One mile north stood the Southside Railroad Bridge, spanning the 75-foot-wide Appomattox River. On 6 April, 1865, nine hundred Union soldiers attempting to burn the 2500-foot-long, 126-foot-high structure were captured by Confederate cavalry. . . . — Map (db m10221) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Farm Road Trace — First Battle of Manassas
Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson's First Virginia Brigade, plus artillery, marched from Confederate headquarters at the Lewis House ("Portici") along this wagon path to Henry Hill, arriving here about noon. — Map (db m8299) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — On the Skirmish Line — Second Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 2:30 p.m.
Thirty minutes before the main assault, Colonel Hiram Berdan's 1st U.S. Sharpshooters clambered over the fence along the Groveton-Sudley Road and dashed into the open pasture. The skilled marksmen kept up a steady fire with their breech-loading . . . — Map (db m58853) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — The Seventy-First Regiment — of Infantry New York State Militia — Colonel Henry P. Martin Commanding
From this position the 71st assisted in driving the Confederate forces back toward Henry Hill. The regiment remained in this area for most of the battle and afterward covered the retreat of the Union Army from the field. The unit suffered 10 killed, . . . — Map (db m8124) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), Strasburg — A-20 — Frontier Fort
This house, built about 1755, is the old Hupp Homestead. It was used as a fort in Indian attacks. — Map (db m661) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), Strasburg — Stonewall’s Surprise — Banks’s Fort
In the spring of 1862, U.S. Army Capt. Edward Hunt, an engineer, constructed a fortification on the hill where the Strasburg water tower now stands. Hunt selected the hill "because it had an effective command over the roads, the railroad, and the . . . — Map (db m9546) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellor — Chancellorsville Campaign — Hooker vs. Lee
"May God have mercy on General Lee for I will have none." -Gen. Joseph Hooker, U.S. Army On May 1, 1863, the head of Union Gen. Joseph Hooker's Army of the Potomac arrived on these fields, apparently completing one of the most successful and . . . — Map (db m11418) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1, 1863, Union troops advancing toward Fredericksburg along this road, the Orange Plank, met the Confederates about a mile to your left and retreated to this point. Hooker, not waiting to be attacked, ordered these troops back to . . . — Map (db m15151) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Hazel Grove
On the morning of May 3, this large, open plateau, known as "Hazel Grove," was the key to the Union position. "Stonewall" Jackson's flank attack the evening before had staggered the Union army but had not seriously damaged it. As the new day dawned, . . . — Map (db m3610) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Civil War Earthworks — Preservation Message
The gentle mounds that meander through Spotsylvania Court House battlefield once looked like the reconstructed earthwork in front of you. The armies built more than 12 miles of trenches here, using whatever tools they could find. Lee's last line, . . . — Map (db m10282) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Landmark in the Wilderness
The building complex known collectively as Wilderness Tavern appeared in the early 19th century to serve the needs of travellers. Located on either side of the Fredericksburg-Orange Turnpike, the original roadbed of which survives today as the . . . — Map (db m7499) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Mayhem in the Muleshoe — The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
Surrounded on all sides by low ridge lines, Neil MccCoull's house sat in the center of the famous Muleshoe Salient. On the night of May 8, 1864, Confederate engineers built the bulging line of earthworks that wrapped around McCoull's farm to the . . . — Map (db m10289) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Sedgwick
(North face): Erected to commemorate this spot where Maj Genl John Sedgwick, U.S. Vols. Commanding Sixth Army Corps was killed in action on the morning of the 9th of May 1864. (East face): A tribute to a beloved Commander by the . . . — Map (db m3694) HM
Virginia, Winchester — 6th Army Corps
(Inscription on Front):Brig. Gen. David A. Russell U.S. Vols. 1st Div. 6th Army Corps Major 8th U.S. Infty. Bvt. Maj. Genl. U.S.A. Born, Salem, N.Y. Dec. 10, 1820 Killed in Action Opequon, Va. Sept. 19, 1864. (Back):Erected By The . . . — Map (db m26565) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd — 1888 - 1957
The Winchester native attended the Virginia Military Institute, The University of Virginia, and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, 1912. He was a pioneer aviator and Polar explorer. In 1926, he was the first to fly over the North Pole for . . . — Map (db m26876) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Second Battle of Winchester
June 13-15, 1863 took place during Gen. Lee’s advance to Gettysburg between Confederates under Gen. Ewell and Federals under Gen. Milroy. The Federals occupied positions on the hills north and west of Winchester now called Milroys and Star Forts . . . — Map (db m2658) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Tennessee
(No Inscription) Map (db m26851) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Second Battle of Kernstown — Two Future U.S. Presidents Fought at Kernstown
Colonel James A. Mulligan’s Union command of 1,800 men encamped on these heights on the night of July 23-24, 1864. When Confederate cavalry drove Union cavalry back toward Kernstown on the morning of the 24th, Mulligan deployed two cannon on this . . . — Map (db m2199) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Thirty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry
. . . — Map (db m26183) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Battle of Laurel Hill — Tempest on the Turnpike
Union and Confederate forces clashed along the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike (the narrow paved road in the foreground) on July 7-11, 1861. Union General Morris was ordered to "amuse" General Garnett at Laurel Hill - to make him believe the main attack . . . — Map (db m34439) HM
West Virginia (Barbour County), Junior — Barbour County / Randolph County
(South Facing Side): Barbour CountyFormed from Harrison, Lewis, and Randolph in 1843. It is named for a distinguished Virginia jurist, Philip Pendleton Barbour. Scene of opening hostilities on land between the armies of the North and . . . — Map (db m33928) HM
West Virginia (Hampshire County), Mechanicsburg — The Civil War in the South Branch Valley
At the time of the Civil War, the South Branch Valley was comprised of many small, independent farms. The mid-19th century was a golden age of agriculture in the eastern United States, and the valley was among the most agriculturally productive . . . — Map (db m25186) HM
West Virginia (Hampshire County), Romney — Fort Pearsall 1754
“Fort Pearsall was on or in view of this site.” Job Pearsall built a fort as protection against the Indians in 1754 on Lot 16, granted by Fairfax in 1749 containing 323 acres, including part of Indian Mound Cemetery. On May 14, . . . — Map (db m2101) HM
West Virginia (Hardy County), Baker — Fr้mont's Camp — En Route to the Shenandoah Valley
For two nights beginning on May 28, 1862, Union Gen. John C. Fr้mont and his approximately 20,000-man army camped on the broad, rolling plateau before you. They had marched from Franklin (Pendleton Co.) three days earlier through the rain and mud, . . . — Map (db m33596) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown Monument
Commemorated here is the original location of the "John Brown Fort"--the Federal Armory's fire engine house where abolitionist John Brown and his raiders were captured by the U.S. Marines on October 18, 1859. If you look to the south, you will see . . . — Map (db m10900) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 3 — Large Arsenal Foundation — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry
Completed in 1800, the 2 1/2-story, brick arsenal building stored weapons made for the security and survival of a young United States of America. Lewis procured 15 rifles from this stockpile. They were the first and most essential weapons his . . . — Map (db m18752) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — The Niagara Movement
Here, on August 15-19, 1906, on the Storer College campus, the Niagara Movement held their first open and public meeting on American soil. Organized by W.E.B. Du Bois and others a year earlier in Erie Beach, Ontario, Canada, the Niagara Movement . . . — Map (db m2937) HM
West Virginia (Pendleton County), Seneca Rocks — More Than One Way Up
The first recorded ascent of Seneca Rocks was in 1939. Since then, climbers have explored a maze of more than four-hundred routes across its face. Some routes lead to the summit; others meet dead-ends. Climbers from around the world come to test . . . — Map (db m23257) HM
West Virginia (Pendleton County), Seneca Rocks — Sites Homestead
Originally constructed around 1830 by Jacob Sites, this homestead started as a single room log cabin. William Sites, one of his two sons, expanded it into a two story frame structure in the late 1850's using locally available materials and skilled . . . — Map (db m23232) HM
West Virginia (Randolph County), Beverly — Beverly
Settled about 1753 by Robert Files and David Tygart. Files' family was massacred near by. Site of Westfall's Fort, 1774. In Mt. Iser Cemetery are the Union trenches and graves of Confederate soldiers killed in Battle of Rich Mountain. — Map (db m24579) HM
West Virginia (Randolph County), Beverly — David Goff House
Edward Hart, son of John Hart who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, purchased the house standing here in 1795. Col. David Goff, a prominent Beverly lawyer, purchased it in 1830, and added the larger front portion of the house, . . . — Map (db m24518) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Parsons — Parsons / Corrick's Ford
(South Side): John Crouch, pioneer settler, established "tomahawk rights" here in 1766, but the town was not incorporated until 1893. Here Shavers Fork and Blackwater unite to form the Cheat River. Hu Maxwell, the historian, lived near. . . . — Map (db m23641) HM
West Virginia (Tucker County), Red Creek — John Wolford
Revolutionary War Soldier John Wolford 1754 - 1839 Built house here about 1805 — Map (db m34639) HM

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