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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

90 East Bay Street Ancrum Wharf Building

Circa 1781

 

—Altered circa 1855 —

 
90 East Bay Street Ancrum Wharf Building Marker and also image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. 90 East Bay Street Ancrum Wharf Building Marker and also
Medallion:
Award 1999
Carolopolis
Condita A.D.
1670
Preservation Society of Charleston
Inscription.
The Ancrum Wharf Building was constructed by Parker Quince and John Ancrum, both North Carolina natives, who were married to Savannah and Mary Rhett. The Rhett sisters were heirs to Col. William Rhett. The Ancrum Wharf Building is one of the few wharf-related eighteenth structures surviving in Charleston and abuts one of the only remaining cobblestone streets. Originally constructed as a three-story building, the Ancrum Wharf Building was altered to function as a two-story building during the mid-nineteenth century. The large windows of the upper floor were altered to mask evidence that this tall upper space once comprised two separate floors.

When first built the Ancrum Wharf Building was across from a public fish market that lay immediately to the south. During the first half of the nineteenth century the Ancrum Wharf Building served as the offices of James Hamilton and Co. who began a steamship service between Charleston and Savannah in 1836. A decade later, under the direction of shipping magnate James Adger, the area behind the Ancrum Wharf Building became the southern terminus for the first steamship line between Charleston and New York. During the twentieth century, the Gaud School was located in the Ancrum Wharf Building from 1928-1941 and again from 1951-1962. After the Gaud School relocated in 1962,
90 East Bay Street Ancrum Wharf Building and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 6, 2011
2. 90 East Bay Street Ancrum Wharf Building and Marker
the building was converted into apartments. In 1998 the Ancrum Wharf Building was renovated as a single family residence.

 
Erected 1999 by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.515′ N, 79° 55.626′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of East Bay Street (U.S. 52) and S Adgers Wharf, on the right when traveling north on East Bay Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 90 East Bay Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Col. Othneil Beale's House (within shouting distance of this marker); 83-107 East Bay Street   Rainbow Row (within shouting distance of this marker); 8-10 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Smith (within shouting distance of this marker); One North Adger's Wharf (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 23 Tradd Street (about 400 feet away); William Mills Tenement (about 400 feet away); As Old as Charleston (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Additional comments.
1. The Carolopolis Award
is a plaque placed on buildings that have been preserved, restored, rehabilitated or are outstanding examples of new construction. The award is presented to those individuals, businesses or organizations that currently own the property. The Carolopolis Award is a slightly modified reproduction of the seal of the City of Charleston. The word Carolopolis comes from the original name of the city
    — Submitted October 7, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 24, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 544 times since then and 65 times this year. Last updated on May 23, 2017, by Spencer Means of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 7, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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