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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Portsmouth in Rockingham County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

James (Stavers)

Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail

 
 
James (Stavers) Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Murray, August 18, 2016
1. James (Stavers) Marker
Inscription. In the midst of the American Revolution in 1777, James, enslaved by tavern owner John Stavers, was ordered to stop a zealous patriot from chopping down the tavern sign. Although James nearly killed the man, it was his owner, a suspected Tory, who was arrested. James had no accountability in the eyes of the law because he was a slave.
 
Location. 43° 4.597′ N, 70° 45.244′ W. Marker is in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in Rockingham County. Marker is at the intersection of Atkinson Street and Court Street on Atkinson Street. Touch for map. Marker is located on a pole near the ticket booth of the Strawberry Banke Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Portsmouth NH 03801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oracle House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Portsmouth Veteran's Memorial (about 400 feet away); Temple Israel (about 500 feet away); Memorial Bridge 1923-2012 (about 600 feet away); Portsmouth NH Marine Railway (about 600 feet away); Portsmouth NH Red Light District (about 600 feet away); Liberty Pole and Bridge (about 700 feet away); Portsmouth Pier & Wharves (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portsmouth.
 
Related markers. Click here
James (Stavers) Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Murray, August 18, 2016
2. James (Stavers) Marker
for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail
 
Also see . . .  Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail.
This three-story tavern, built in 1766, is most remembered as the scene of Revolutionary turmoil and visits of famous patriots. Enslaved people were a recurrent part of tavern-owner John Stavers’ life. In earlier years Stavers was charged with beating someone else’s black servant. He also auctioned people imported from the West Indies, advertised for his run-away 16-year-old slave named Fortune, and charged a fee to view a 9-year-old albino African boy. (Submitted on April 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansIndustry & CommerceWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 20, 2016, by James R. Murray of Elkton, Florida. This page has been viewed 243 times since then and 46 times this year. Last updated on April 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 20, 2016, by James R. Murray of Elkton, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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