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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Edward Steves Homestead

Built 1876

 
 
Steves Homestead Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
1. Steves Homestead Plaque
Inscription.
Given in 1952 by his granddaughter, Edna Steves Vaughan, and her husband, Curtis T. Vaughan. Owned, restored and maintained as a house museum by the San Antonio Conservation Society.
 
Erected by San Antonio Conservation Society.
 
Location. 29° 24.761′ N, 98° 29.717′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is on King William Street south of East Johnson Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Homestead Plaque is mounted at eye-level, directly on the front wall of the subject building, just to the left of the main front entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 509 King William Street, San Antonio TX 78204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Edward Steves House (here, next to this marker); Biesenbach House (within shouting distance of this marker); King William Neighborhood (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Elias and Lucy Edmonds House (about 500 feet away); Carl Hilmar Guenther House (about 500 feet away); Norton-Polk-Mathis House (about 500 feet away); Alfred Giles House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Guenther's Upper Mill (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Regarding Edward Steves Homestead.
Edward Steves Homestead (<i>front view; marker visible just left of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
2. Edward Steves Homestead (front view; marker visible just left of entrance)
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark (1970)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Edward Steves Homestead
 
Also see . . .
1. Steves Homestead. The fountain in the side yard was purchased by Mr. Steves at the Philadelphia Centennial exposition of 1876. (Submitted on June 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Edward Steves. In 1866 Steves entered the lumber business in San Antonio, where he became known for his Louisiana cypress and long-leaf Florida pine, brought by oxcart from Indianola. His business expanded rapidly after the arrival of the railroad in 1877, and his four-acre lumberyard beside the depot served a trade area that extended to northern Mexico and Fort Davis in Jeff Davis County. Real estate investments had become increasingly important to Steves by 1882, when he retired from active participation in the lumber business. By that time his fine home, along with others on King William Street, had come to symbolize the success of German immigrants in frontier Texas. (Submitted on July 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Edward Steves Homestead (<i>northeast corner & fountain view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
3. Edward Steves Homestead (northeast corner & fountain view)
Edward Steves Homestead (<i>north side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
4. Edward Steves Homestead (north side view)
Edward Steves Homestead (<i>front landscaping view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
5. Edward Steves Homestead (front landscaping view)
Edward Steves Homestead image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2018
6. Edward Steves Homestead
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 56 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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