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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Elizabeth in Union County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Elizabeth Presbyterian Church

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
Elizabeth Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 6, 2011
1. Elizabeth Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription.
This church was organized about 1664. The edifice which stood on this spot was burned by the British, January 25, 1780, during the Pastorate of Rev. James Caldwell, Chaplain in the New Jersey Brigade under Washington.
This building was completed in 1789.
Thirty-six commissioned officers and many non-commissioned officers and privates from the congregation fought during the Revolution for American Independence.
 
Erected 1898 by Elizabethtown Chapter No. 1 of the New Jersey Society - Sons of the American Revolution. (Marker Number 48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 40° 39.761′ N, 74° 12.918′ W. Marker is in Elizabeth, New Jersey, in Union County. Marker is on Broad Street (New Jersey Route 623), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Elizabeth NJ 07201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonial Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriotic Dead (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Borough Court House (within shouting distance of this marker);
Marker in Elizabeth image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 6, 2011
2. Marker in Elizabeth
The marker is seen here next to the front door of the Presbyterian Church.
Revolutionary Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); First Site of Princeton University (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Academy (about 300 feet away); Washington’s Inaugural Bicentennial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Seven Astronauts (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Elizabeth.
 
Regarding Elizabeth Presbyterian Church. Elizabeth Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

Organized 1664 as a Congregationalist church, Old First Church was the first English-speaking congregation in New Jersey. Pastor Jonathan Dickinson brought the congregation into the Presbyterian denomination in 1717, and
First Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 6, 2011
3. First Presbyterian Church
as the first president of the College of New Jersey (Princeton University), he held the new school's first classes in the Elizabeth-Town manse. The second building, erected in 1724, was burned in 1780 by loyalists, retaliating against James Caldwell's patriot preaching at Elizabeth-Town. Elias Boudinot, president of First Church's Board of Trustees, served in the Revolution and later became president of Congress and superintendent of the U.S. Mint.

 
Also see . . .  National Register of Historic Places datasheet. Statement of significance for this church (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionWar, US Revolutionary
 
Grave of Rev. James Caldwell image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 6, 2011
4. Grave of Rev. James Caldwell
Pastor James Caldwell and his wife Hannah are buried in the Presbyterian Church cemetary. Both were killed during the course of the Revolutionary War.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 6, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 431 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on August 22, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 6, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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