Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Presbyterian Church

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
1. First Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription. Oldest public building in Carlisle; erection begun, 1757. Here colonists met in 1774 to declare for independence, and George Washington worshipped, 1794. Congregation organized at Meeting House Springs in 1734.
 
Erected 1949 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. (Marker Number 54.)
 
Location. 40° 12.09′ N, 77° 11.347′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Hanover Street (U.S. 11) and High Street (Pennsylvania Route 74), on the right when traveling south on Hanover Street. Touch for map. Marker is near northwest corner of intersection. Marker is at or near this postal address: 24 N. Hanover Street, Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Episcopal Square (within shouting distance of this marker); The Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this marker); Forbes Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Cumberland County (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this
First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
2. First Presbyterian Church Marker
marker); a different marker also named First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The Return of the Captives (within shouting distance of this marker); 1753 Carlisle Indian Conference (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Regarding First Presbyterian Church. The The Westminster Presbyterian Church is one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

Organized in 1734 at Meeting House Springs, First Church's building in Carlisle was designed by Robert Smith of Philadelphia and completed about 1769. Additions have been made in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. James Wilson, signer of the Declaration of Independence, was a trustee of the congregation. The General Assembly of the PCUSA met here in 1792 and 1795 and First Church's pastor, Robert
First Presbyterian Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
3. First Presbyterian Church and Marker
Davidson, was elected moderator in 1796. In 1794, President George Washington, his staff, and Pennsylvania Governor Thomas Mifflin, reviewed troops and then worshipped in the meetinghouse. The grammar school founded by the congregation in 1773 later merged with Dickinson College.

 
Also see . . .  First Presbyterian Church website. (Submitted on February 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionWar, US Revolutionary
 
First Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
4. First Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 774 times since then and 26 times this year. Last updated on August 24, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 2, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.