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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mammoth Hot Springs in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

From Soldier to Ranger

 
 
From Soldier to Ranger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rich Pfingsten, March 23, 2009
1. From Soldier to Ranger Marker
Inscription. In 1912, President Taft in a special message to Congress said:

"I earnestly recommend the establishment of a bureau of National Parks. Such legislation is essential to the proper management of those wonderful manifestations of nature, so startling and so beautiful that everyone recognizes the obligations of the government to preserve them for the edification and recreation of the people."

The National Park Service Act was signed on August 25, 1916. Soon after, soldiers were discharged from the Army to form the first ranks of park rangers and a maintenance force. The National Park Service took over protection of Yellowstone National Park, "by arrangement with the War Department, and with its hearty cooperation," on October 1, 1916. Though local opposition resulted in one last episode of Army residency, the National Park Service assumed full administrative responsibilities in 1918.

. Fort Yellowstone was officially transferred to the new civilian agency. However, the Army's legacy is visible in wood and stone, and in the very survival of Yellowstone as one of the world's great symbols of the National Park idea.

Inset captions: 1) Seventh Cavalry, Troop G collar insignia, 2) National Park Service Badge, 3) Troop F, First U.S. Cavalry in front of enlisted men's barracks, 1913.
 
Erected by
From Soldier to Ranger Marker with Enlisted Men's Barracks in the background image. Click for full size.
By Rich Pfingsten, March 23, 2009
2. From Soldier to Ranger Marker with Enlisted Men's Barracks in the background
National Park Service.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 44° 58.592′ N, 110° 41.941′ W. Marker was in Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker was on Officer's Row 0 miles south of Mammoth Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is along the south side of a sidewalk leading to the Enlisted Men's Barracks building. Marker was in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named From Soldier to Ranger (a few steps from this marker); Fort Yellowstone (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Historic Fort Yellowstone (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported permanently removed. ); Fort Yellowstone     National Historic Landmark (within shouting distance of this marker); The Parade Ground (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Elk Rut (about 300 feet away); The Post Exchange (about 300 feet away); Life in the Fort (about 300 feet away).
 
More about this marker. This marker was removed and replaced with a new marker nearby, also called From Soldier to Ranger.
 
Categories. Military
 
Enlisted Men's Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Rich Pfingsten, March 23, 2009
3. Enlisted Men's Barracks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 28, 2011, by Rich Pfingsten of Forest Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 480 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on September 11, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 28, 2011, by Rich Pfingsten of Forest Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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