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St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Birth of Antique Row

Cherokee-Lemp Historic District

 
 
The Birth of Antique Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, October 7, 2018
1. The Birth of Antique Row Marker
Inscription. Following World War II, changing lifestyles and housing patterns and the development of shopping strips and shopping malls brought decline to old-fashioned business districts like Cherokee Street.

Homemaker Antiques, established in 1945, both anticipated and spurred the district's reincarnation as Cherokee Street's Antique Row.

This family business began when Ambrose Christopher Daues was forced to change careers because of a heart condition. He gave up his job that required traveling and bought a used furniture store, Homemaker Furniture Shop, then located at 2204 Cherokee.

The evolution from used furniture into the antique business began with Daues finding boxes and barrels of china and glassware stored in the shop. Leonora, Ambrose's wife, had worked in the fine china department of Famous-Barr. She recognized the quality of the glassware and began washing it and displaying it in the shop windows. It sold briskly.

Ambrose Christopher Daues died about three years after he bought the business. His widow moved the store to 2124 Cherokee in 1952. The corner storefront had been built in 1902 to house David's Furniture Company. Leonora filled the store to overflowing. "If it stood still, she bought it," Patricia Daues Heffner said recalling how her mother kept the store stocked. "My mother didn't
The Birth of Antique Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, October 7, 2018
2. The Birth of Antique Row Marker
drive. The farmers from Illinois brought her things they dug up -- arrowheads, ancient farm equipment,... The store offered Indian pottery that is now in museums, unusual furniture, cabinets full of cut glass." According to Patricia Daues Heffner, her mother, "Bought and sold Depression Glass before it was called Depression Glass."

Patricia Daues Heffner developed expertise in dolls and doll restoration. She also learned china and porcelain painting and restoration of decorative painting on furniture. When Leonora died in 1975, Patricia, her husband Robert Heffner and son James took over the day-to-day operations of the business.
 
Erected 1999 by NiNi Harris. (Marker Number S.)
 
Location. 38° 35.576′ N, 90° 13.39′ W. Marker is in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker is at the intersection of Missouri Avenue and Cherokee Street, on the right when traveling north on Missouri Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2124 Cherokee Street, Saint Louis MO 63118, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 2201 Cherokee (within shouting distance of this marker); Bardenheier Row (within shouting distance of this marker); Life In The Fifties (within shouting distance of this marker); The Cigar Store (within shouting distance of this marker); 2215 Cherokee (within shouting distance of this marker); South St. Louis Architect (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 2225 Cherokee (about 300 feet away); 2301 Cherokee (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Louis.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 37 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 9, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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