Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hungerford in Wharton County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford

 
 
New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, October 6, 2018
1. New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker
Inscription.  Attracted by the State of Texas' offer of free land to railroad developers, a charter for the New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad was secured in 1880. Its major investor, John W. Mackay, made his fortune in the Nevada silver mines. His brother-in-law, count Joseph Telfener of Lombardy, Italy, arranged for the construction. Work began in 1880 on the 91-mile stretch of railroad track between Rosenberg and Victoria. The pasta diet of many of the Italian laborers lent itself to the railroad's nickname, the "Macaroni Line."

Telfener and Mackay established six stations along the line--Inez, Louise, Edna, Hungerford, Telfener, and Mackay and named them for themselves and family members. The community of Hungerford was named for their father-in-law Daniel E. Hungerford, who served as vice-president of the New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad. Not the successful business venture they had envisioned, the company was sold to Southern Pacific Railway in 1885.

With an economy based on farming and ranching, the community of Hungerford has continued to flourish over the years. Its origin is a reflection of the varied history of the railroad
New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, October 6, 2018
2. New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker
in Texas.
Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986

 
Erected 1986 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3588.)
 
Location. 29° 23.936′ N, 96° 4.628′ W. Marker is in Hungerford, Texas, in Wharton County. Marker is at the intersection of Business U.S. 59 and East Railroad Street, on the right when traveling south on U.S. 59Business . There are four markers at this location,attached to a granite monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hungerford TX 77448, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Post West Bernard Station (here, next to this marker); J. D. Hudgins Ranch (here, next to this marker); Site of Quinan Community (here, next to this marker); Site of World War II Prisoner of War Camp (approx. 5.3 miles away); Kendleton (approx. 5.7 miles away); a different marker also named Kendleton (approx. 5.7 miles away); Judge George E. Quinan (approx. 6.2 miles away); Security Bank and Trust Company (approx. 6.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hungerford.
 
Also see . . .
1. From the Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on October 25, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. From Texas Highways. (Submitted on October 25, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. Part of Jackson County Texas History
New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, March 16, 2019
3. New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford Marker
Marker is the right of the two visible in this photo.
. Contains an article from The Galveston County News and an article from a Houston, Texas newspaper. (Submitted on October 25, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers
 

More. Search the internet for New York, Texas & Mexican Railroad and The Community of Hungerford.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 19, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 23 times this year. Last updated on October 25, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 8, 2018, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.   3. submitted on March 19, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement