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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seattle in King County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Old Shell House

 
 
The Old Shell House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee C, July 13, 2019
1. The Old Shell House Marker
Inscription.  Built by the US Navy in 1918 as a hangar to house amphibious aircraft for the aviation training corps, this building served as the University of Washington's shell house from 1920 to 1949. Several generations of Husky oarsmen trained here, including the renowned 1936 Gold Medal crew, “The Boys In the Boat.”

Gordan Adam • George “Shorty” Hunt • Roger Morris • Chuck Day • Jim “Stub” McMillin • Joe Rantz • Don Hume • Bob Moch • John White Jr.

George Pocock, master shell builder, maintained a shop and practiced his craft in a loft at the rear of the building from 1922 to 1949.
 
Erected 2016 by UW Alumni Association. Plaque donated by Daniel James Brown, author of “The Boys In the Boat.” National Register of Historic Places #75001856.
 
Location. 47° 38.869′ N, 122° 18.005′ W. Marker is in Seattle, Washington, in King County. Marker can be reached from Walla Walla Road east of Montlake Boulevard NE. It is on the University of Washington Campus. Marker is mounted

The Old Shell House image. Click for full size.
By Lee C, July 13, 2019
2. The Old Shell House
Original Seaplane Hangar Doors
on the north side of building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3655 Walla Walla Rd, Seattle WA 98195, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 1890 Seattle Fire Department Bell (approx. 0.2 miles away); Naval Training Station Seattle (approx. 0.4 miles away); Scion of the Washington Elm (approx. 0.7 miles away); George Washington (approx. ¾ mile away); Medal of Honor Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); United Confederate Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Reverend George Whitworth Grave (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Fremont Troll (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Seattle.
 
Regarding The Old Shell House. This building is the only remaining WWI-era, US Navy, all-wood, seaplane hangar left in the world. Built in 1918, the war ended just a few months after it's completion. It was turned over to the University of Washington which quickly recognized it’s value as a shell house for the rowing team.

In 1922, George Pocock, the premier builder of collegiate rowing shells, set up shop in this hangar and constructed shells there until 1949. After 1949, the building would become the university’s “Canoe House” where students could rent canoes, kayaks, and row boats. Over the last few years it has served as a boat storage
The Old Shell House Interior image. Click for full size.
By Lee C, July 13, 2019
3. The Old Shell House Interior
facility.
 
Also see . . .
1. Shell House History. (Submitted on June 29, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.)
2. HistoryLink Essay - ASUW Shell House (1918). (Submitted on June 29, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.)
3. Commemorating the Canoe House. (Submitted on June 29, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.)
4. Century-old ASUW Shell House is where the ‘Boys in the Boat’ became a team. (Submitted on August 18, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.)
5. ‘Cathedral’ on the Cut filled with history and meaning. (Submitted on August 18, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.)
6. Saving the Home of "The Boys in the Boat" and Men in the Ships. Includes radio podcast. (Submitted on September 11, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.) 
 
Additional keywords. Rowing Seaplanes
 
Categories. Air & SpaceSports
 
George Pocock's shell-building shop image. Click for full size.
By Lee C, July 13, 2019
4. George Pocock's shell-building shop
 

More. Search the internet for The Old Shell House.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington. This page has been viewed 149 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 29, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington.   3, 4. submitted on July 14, 2019, by Lee C of Orting, Washington. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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