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East Corner in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, East Cornerstone

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
Inscription.  
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791-1792
Protected by Dist. of Co. Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1916

 
Erected 1916 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.571′ N, 76° 54.57′ W. Marker is in East Corner, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Eastern Avenue Northeast and Southern Avenue Northeast, on the left when traveling east on Eastern Avenue Northeast. Marker is about 50 feet east of the intersection, in a wooded area. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 302 Eastern Avenue Northeast, Washington DC 20019, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. All Veterans of Seat Pleasant (approx. mile away in Maryland); William Sidney Pittman and Portia Washington Pittman House Site (approx. 0.3 miles away in Maryland); 72-09-36 Doswell Brooks House
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
(Newly Painted)
(approx. 0.3 miles away in Maryland); Misery (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland); 72-09-41 Bungalow Row (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland); 72-09-38 Charity Hall (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland); 72-09-35 Cornelius Fonville House (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland); 72-09-33 Henry Pinckney House (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland).
 
Regarding Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, East Cornerstone. This marker is known as the East marker, as it marks the most eastern part of the District of Columbia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. (Submitted on April 3, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
2. The Boundary Monuments. of the District of Columbia, Marcus Baker May 1897. (Submitted on October 12, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
3. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
Southeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. Southeast Side of Marker
Because this stone is in the eastern corner of DC, two sides of this marker (NE and SE) face the state of Maryland.
Northeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
5. Northeast Side of Marker
Another of the two sides of this marker that face the state of Maryland.
Northwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
6. Northwest Side of Marker
This side is split between between "Maryland" and the "Jurisdiction of the United States".
Southwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
7. Southwest Side of Marker
This side is split between between the "Jurisdiction of the United States" and "Maryland".
East Corner image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne
8. East Corner
Marcus Baker's 1897 photo of the East Corner Monument.
Corner of Eastern and Southern Avenues North East image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
9. Corner of Eastern and Southern Avenues North East
 

More. Search the internet for Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, East Cornerstone.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 11, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,918 times since then and 28 times this year. Last updated on October 11, 2019, by Roberto Bernate of Arlington, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on February 10, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on October 12, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on February 10, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on October 12, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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