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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Charleston City Market

 
 
Charleston City Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
1. Charleston City Market Marker
Inscription.
On this site stands one of Charleston’s oldest public facilities in continuous use: the Charleston Market. Earlier markets, dating back to the city’s relocation to the peninsula, ca. 1680, offered meat, fish, and vegetables at different sites. After the American Revolution, however, the city sought to consolidate this activity in one location and chose the present site, which was then a creek and marsh extending from Meeting Street to the Cooper River, briefly designated Canal or Channel Street.
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Six neighbors, among them Charles Cotesworth Pickney, who owned the largest portion, donated land in March 1788, directing the city to open a market. By 1792, some marsh and creek had been filled and a 200 foot long brick market, stood near Meeting Street. In late 1793, the city converted that structure to house refugees from Santo Domingo, and the land reverted to its original owners because a market had not been erected within the specified time. Once the property was again donated to the city in 1804 and construction resumed. The “Centre Market”, consisting of separate sheds for fresh meats and vegetables, opened 1 August 1807, while sheds for fish and “small meats” opened later. Here, the city’s population, both slave and free, gathered daily to sell and buy locally raised commodities
Charleston City Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
2. Charleston City Market Marker
and imported delicacies.
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Market Hall, designed by E.B. White and built for the Meetings of the Market Commissioners and others, opened in 1841 on the site of the original depot for country wagons. The rise of grocery stores and refrigeration in the early twentieth century sapped the market’s vitality, and its fortunes steadily declined. Renewal projects beginning in the 1970’s spurred a revitalization of the market and surrounding area. The historic restoration of Market Hall was completed by the City of Charleston in 2003. In 2010, the market sheds were completely restored by the City of Charleston, in partnership with the City Marker Preservation Trust.
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The Market was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975. Although damaged by fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, and an earthquake, the City Market continues to function in the heart of the Historic District as one of Charleston’s most cherished institutions.

This plaque was placed in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the City Market.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.844′ N, 79° 55.885′ W. Marker is in Charleston
Charleston City Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
3. Charleston City Market Marker
The Charleston City Market marker can be seen in the archway on the left. The National Historic Landmark marker is on the right.
, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Meeting Street and S Market Street, on the right when traveling north on Meeting Street. Touch for map. Marker is located near the Confederate Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 188 Meeting Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City Market (here, next to this marker); The Site of Carteret Bastion (within shouting distance of this marker); The Nicholas Trott House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Trott's Cottage (about 600 feet away); Site of the First Methodist Church (about 600 feet away); The Old Powder Magazine (about 600 feet away); Riviera Theatre (about 600 feet away); Revolutionary Artillery (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
National Historic Landmark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
4. National Historic Landmark Marker
Confederate Museum in Charleston image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
5. Confederate Museum in Charleston
The Charleston City Market marker is located near the Confederate Museum, at the western end of the market.
Charleston City Market image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, Charleston
6. Charleston City Market
Charleston, S.C. The old Market House (188 Meeting Street) image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 20, 2010
7. Charleston, S.C. The old Market House (188 Meeting Street)
1865 Charleston, S.C. The old Market House (188 Meeting Street) image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher
8. 1865 Charleston, S.C. The old Market House (188 Meeting Street)
Courtesy of the Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 358 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 8, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7, 8. submitted on August 11, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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