Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Watsonville in Santa Cruz County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Discovery of California Redwoods

 
 
The Discovery of California Redwoods Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 28, 2015
1. The Discovery of California Redwoods Marker
Inscription. July 14, 1769, an expedition led by Don Gaspar de Portola left San Diego to rediscover Vizcaino's "Lost Port of Monterey". The expedition reached but failed to recognize Monterey Bay, traveled north, and discovered San Francisco Bay November 4, 1769. Among the members of the expedition was Fray Juan Crespi, O.F.M., who kept a diary which contains the following enter on October 10, 1769.

"We broke camp in the morning, and after crossing a river named by the soldiers Rio de Pajaro, we headed in a north wester;y direction... Because of the condition of the sick men in litters we halted again after traveling a little more than a league near a little lagoon where there was ample feed and much wild game... The plains and low hills were forested with very high trees of a red color unknown to us... different than cedar, although the wood resembles cedar in color and is very brittle. Because of the red color they were named palo colorado.

Here on the "little lagoon" now known as Pinto Lake the California Redwood was first discovered by a European.
 
Erected 1968 by Pajaro Valley Historical Association and Citizens of Watsonville.
 
Location. 36° 56.926′ N, 121° 45.954′ W. Marker is near
The Discovery of California Redwoods Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 28, 2015
2. The Discovery of California Redwoods Marker
The trees beside this monument are not California Redwoods.
Watsonville, California, in Santa Cruz County. Marker is on Pinto Lake Road near Green Valley Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Pinto Lake Road, Watsonville CA 95076, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Whiskey Hill (approx. 1.1 miles away); James A. Hall (approx. 1.4 miles away); Charley Darkey Parkhurst (approx. 1.6 miles away); Lest We Forget (approx. 2.3 miles away); St. Patricks Church (approx. 2˝ miles away); Rancho San Andrés Castro Adobe (was approx. 2˝ miles away but has been reported missing. ); Watsonville (approx. 2˝ miles away); Men Die O Liberty That Thou Endurs (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Watsonville.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at Pinto Lake City Park, not Pinto Lake County Park!
 
Also see . . .  Sequoia sempervirens - Wikipedia. (The) California redwood... is an evergreen, long-lived, monoecious tree living 1,200–1,800 years or more. This species includes the tallest living trees on Earth, reaching up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 29.2 feet (8.9 m) in diameter at breast height / dbh. These trees are also among the oldest living things on Earth.
Portola Expedition plaque image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 27, 2015
3. Portola Expedition plaque
The plaque on the base of this water fountain, located near the Pinto Lake boat ramp, reads as follows:
Dedicated to
Portola's Expedition
1769
Native Sons of the Golden West
Watsonville Parlor No. 65
Native Daughters of the Golden West
El Pajaro Parlor No. 35
April 29, 1969
(Submitted on July 29, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationHorticulture & Forestry
 
Pinto Lake image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 27, 2015
4. Pinto Lake
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 203 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 29, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement