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Near Travelers Rest in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Laodicea Langston Springfield

(Dicey)

 
 
Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mitch Gambrell, August 15, 2008
1. Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker








Inscription.  
On this site
stood the home of
Laodicea Langston Springfield
("Dicey")
1759 - 1837

Heroine of
the American Revolution.
To her daring and courage
many patriots owed their lives.
This rock was
a hearthstone in her home.

[On a separate plaque, mounted above the original, is inscribed the following]:

Laodicea (Dicey) Langston
May 14, 1766 - May 23, 1837
Wife of
Thomas Springfield
July 15, 1766 - March 21, 1845
(Corrected 1966)

 
Erected 1933 by Nathanael Greene Chapter, D.A.R.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: HeroesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution series list. A significant historical month for this entry is March 1848.
 
Location. 34° 58.907′ N, 82° 24.233′ W. Marker is near Travelers Rest, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Tigerville Road, 1.3 miles east of U.S. 25, on
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the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Travelers Rest SC 29690, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John L. Plyler Home (approx. 2˝ miles away); William Preston Few (1867-1940) (approx. 2.7 miles away); The "Pearis" of "Paris" Mountain (approx. 2.9 miles away); John Broadus Watson (approx. 3.2 miles away); Getting Water from Here to There (approx. 3.3 miles away); Bull's Eye! (approx. 3.3 miles away); The Original Water Filter (approx. 3.6 miles away); Sulphur Spring (approx. 3.7 miles away); Barracks in the Woods (approx. 3.7 miles away); Lynching in America / The Lynching of Tom Keith (approx. 4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Travelers Rest.
 
Also see . . .
1. Laodicea "Daring Dicey" Langston. Site commemorating the life of Laodicea (Dicey) Langston Springfield, Revolutionary War Heroine. (Submitted on August 15, 2008, by M. L. 'Mitch' Gambrell of Taylors, South Carolina.) 

2. Historical Documents About Laodicea Langston Springfield. Collection of documents on Dicey Springfield. (Submitted on December 15, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. Laodicea Langston
Laodicea (Dicey) Langston image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mitch Gambrell, August 15, 2008
2. Laodicea (Dicey) Langston
May 14, 1766 - May 23, 1837 Wife of Thomas Springfield July 15, 1766 - March 21, 1845 (Corrected 1966)
Springfield Obituary

Greenville (SC) Mountaineer
June 10, 1837

Died on Tuesday, the 23rd ult., Mrs. Laodicea Springfield, aged 71 years, wife of Thomas Springfield. The deceased was the daughter of Solomon Langston of Revolutionary memory, whose family perhaps suffered more from the ruthless ravages of the Tories and Indians than almost any other, and the subject of this remark took an active part in the struggle and performed many daring deeds on behalf of her suffering country and friends. She was the mother of 22 children and has left about 140 grand and great grand children. She was a kind and affectionate wife, mother, and neighbor, and has left a large circle of acquaintances to deplore her loss.
    — Submitted December 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Laodicea Langston Springfield
Laodicea (Dicey) Langston Springfield, born in 1766, lived on Duncan's Creek in what is now Laurens County with her parents, Solomon and Sarah Bennett Langston. According to her obituary in the Greenville Mountaineer, she "took an active part in the struggle and performed many daring deeds." Family tradition filled out the story. During the raids of 1781 she learned that the community in which her brother James was about to be attacked
Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, November 23, 2010
3. Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker
by Loyalists. To warn him, she walked through the night -- wading swamps and creeks up to her neck. On another occasion she protected her elderly father from Tory raiders by throwing herself between him and the Loyalists. Once she refused to give information to Tories. "Shoot me, if you dare," she said. "I will not tell you." In 1783, after the war, she married Thomas Springfield, and they settled in upper Greenville District near present-day Travelers Rest. (Source: Greenville: The History of the City and County in the South Carolina Piedmont by Archie Vernon Huff (1995) pgs 28-29.)
    — Submitted December 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, November 23, 2010
4. Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker
Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mitch Gambrell, August 15, 2008
5. Laodicea Langston Springfield Marker
Dicey Langston's Act of Heroism image. Click for full size.
6. Dicey Langston's Act of Heroism
Burial of Laodicea Langston "Dicey" Springfield image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, May 25, 1837
7. Burial of Laodicea Langston "Dicey" Springfield
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 15, 2008, by M. L. 'Mitch' Gambrell of Taylors, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,492 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 15, 2008, by M. L. 'Mitch' Gambrell of Taylors, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on December 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on August 15, 2008, by M. L. 'Mitch' Gambrell of Taylors, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on December 15, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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May. 18, 2024