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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lincoln in Grafton County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Railroads tame the White Mountains

 
 
Railroads tame the White Mountains Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
1. Railroads tame the White Mountains Marker
Inscription.  
Rivers as roads for lumber
In New England, limber and pulp mills traditionally got their wood from logs harvested in the winter and floated downstream during spring floods.

Enterprising lumber baron
J.E. Henry built a railroad that made it possible for timber to reach the mills the same day it was cut, all year long. Lumber or paper could be at market within the week, turning a quick profit.

“There’s no secret about this business of ours. We own the land and the timber and we’re making every dollar out of it we can.”
George Henry, J.E.’s son and partner

Logging on a massive scale
This wild and restless land had never been harvested prior to the 1880s because the rivers were too swift and rocky to run logs downstream. With the coming of the railroads, all that changed.

Outcry and renewal
Public outcry over Henry’s logging practices, which were typical of the time, led to the eventual creation of the National Forest – and conservation and renewal of the lands his company had damaged.

A mountain of lumber by rail
The East Branch

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& Lincoln and the Hancock Branch railroads carried over 600 million board feet of lumber out of these mountains from 1893 to 1948. That’s enough to fill a line of railcars from here to Phoenix, Arizona.

Footprint for the Kancamagus
This Scenic Byway was built on the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad bed to the hairpin turn at Hancock Overlook. The road was eventually completed all the way to Conway in 1948.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 44° 3.44′ N, 71° 38.083′ W. Marker is in Lincoln, New Hampshire, in Grafton County. Marker is on Kancamagus Highway, on the right when traveling east. The Marker is at the entrance to the Loon Mountain Resort. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lincoln NH 03251, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Loon Mountain (here, next to this marker); The Bear Show (approx. 2.6 miles away); The First Passenger Carrying Aerial Tramway in North America (approx. 2.6 miles away); Borasaurus (approx. 2.6 miles away); Quinten E. Mulleavey (approx. 2.7 miles away); Clark's Bridge (approx. 2.7 miles away); Betty and Barney Hill Incident (approx. 3.1 miles away); Vietnam Veterans (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lincoln.

Railroads tame the White Mountains Marker (<i>wide view; engine in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 6, 2017
2. Railroads tame the White Mountains Marker (wide view; engine in background)

 
Also see . . .  East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. Images from the railroad's right of way. (Submitted on April 13, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Insert 1 - J.E. Henry image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
3. Insert 1 - J.E. Henry
Insert 2 - A logging camp on wheels image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
4. Insert 2 - A logging camp on wheels
Insert 3 - A logging train image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
5. Insert 3 - A logging train
Insert 4 - The rail lines and the Kancamagus Highway route image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
6. Insert 4 - The rail lines and the Kancamagus Highway route
Engine and Log Car image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 6, 2017
7. Engine and Log Car
Nearby, an engine and log car. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, September 2008
8. Nearby, an engine and log car.
Interpretive Sign near marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 6, 2017
9. Interpretive Sign near marker
Loon Mountain
Section of Logging Railroad
1893 - 1947
A billion feet of logs were
hauled over this track.
Lincoln, N.H.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 23, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 417 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 23, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   2. submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 23, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   7. submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   8. submitted on July 23, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   9. submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 28, 2024