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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
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African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg

City of Fredericksburg, Virginia

 
 
African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
1. African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg Marker
Inscription.  The Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site) resides on the site once occupied by the African Baptist Church. Constructed as the Fredericksburg Baptist Church, the building was sold to its African-American members in 1857, after the white congregation had moved to a larger sanctuary on Princess Anne Street.

The African Baptists initially had a white pastor because Virginia law prohibited blacks from meeting without a white person present. Following the Civil War, the congregation adopted the name Shiloh Baptist Church and George L. Dixon, a slave who had purchased his freedom in 1856, became the first black pastor.

In 1886, a portion of the structure collapsed, a result of periodic flooding. Church members disagreed on where to rebuild and eventually divided into two congregations. In 1890, Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site) rose where the original church had stood. Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site) established itself on Princess Anne and Wolfe Streets.
 
Erected by City of Fredericksburg.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African Americans
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Churches & Religion. A significant historical year for this entry is 1857.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 38° 18.124′ N, 77° 27.445′ W. Marker was in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker was at the intersection of Sophia Street and Hanover Street on Sophia Street. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site) (here, next to this marker); The African Baptist Church (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site) (within shouting distance of this marker); 1950 Walker-Grant Protest (within shouting distance of this marker); c. 1785 (within shouting distance of this marker); Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts (within shouting distance of this marker); 1831 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named 1831 (about 300 feet away); 1892 (about 300 feet away); 1866 (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This marker has been replaced by the linked marker.
 
African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
2. African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg Marker
Reverend George H. Rowe served as the first pastor to the African Baptist Church. He resigned after the Emancipation Proclamation took effect, on January 1st, 1863.
Rev. James E. Brown image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
3. Rev. James E. Brown
“Reverend James E. Brown came to the Shiloh Baptist Church in 1887. He remained with the congregation that rebuilt this church in 1890.”
Site of the African Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
4. Site of the African Baptist Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2023. It was originally submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,586 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on February 13, 2016, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Mar. 4, 2024