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Near Donegal in Bulloch County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Union Meeting House

(Organized 1790)

 
 
Union Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. Union Meeting House Marker
Inscription.  Three miles east of this point, on the old River Road, is located Union Meeting House (Methodist), the oldest church in Bulloch county, and one of the oldest churches in Georgia remaining continuously active since its organization. Title was acquired from the State by grant to Joseph Jackson, Jarvis Jackson, Lemuel Williams, Griffin Merrill and Joshua Hodges, Trustees, dated September 1, 1794, recorded in Screven County, the land being then a part of that county. Plat made about that time by William Blair, an Irishman, showed the meeting house already located on the land, indicating its earlier origin.

Out of this church and community have come many devout men and women. Among the earlier members was the famed Lydia Anciaux, widow of Col. Nicholas Anciaux, a Frenchman and Revolutionary War hero, whose dughter became wife of Senator McPherson Berrien, Attorney general in President Andrew Jackson's cabinet. Legend says that Bishop Francis Asbury preached there and Lorenzo Dow also visited and preached there.
 
Erected 1953 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 016-1.)
 
Topics and series.
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This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionGovernment & PoliticsWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #07 Andrew Jackson, the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher, and the Georgia Historical Society series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is September 1, 1869.
 
Location. 32° 32.745′ N, 81° 43.385′ W. Marker is near Donegal, Georgia, in Bulloch County. Marker is at the intersection of Old River Road North (County Route 474) and Jones Ln Memorial Highway (U.S. 301), on the right when traveling west on Old River Road North. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Statesboro GA 30461, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Savannah Road (a few steps from this marker); Louisville Road (approx. 3.3 miles away); The March to the Sea (approx. 3.3 miles away); Cooperville (approx. 3.3 miles away); a different marker also named Union Meeting House
Union Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Union Meeting House Marker
Intersection of Old River Rd N (CR 474) and US-301
(approx. 3.4 miles away); Sherman's Advance (approx. 4.4 miles away); Rigdon’s Mill / The Rigdon Cemetery (approx. 5 miles away); Akins’ Mill Pond / The Families of Akins’ Mill Pond (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Francis Asbury. Asbury preached in all sorts of places: courthouses, public houses, tobacco houses, fields, public squares, wherever a crowd assembled to hear him. For the remainder of his life he rode an average of 6000 miles each year, preaching virtually every day and conducting meetings and conferences. Under his direction the church grew from 1,200 to 214,000 members and 700 ordained preachers. (Submitted on August 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Wikipedia entry for Lorenzo Dow. A fierce abolitionist, Dow's sermons were often unpopular in the southern United States, and he frequently was threatened with personal violence. He sometimes was forcibly ejected from towns, pelted with stones, eggs, and rotten vegetables. That never stopped him; he simply walked to the next town and gave the same sermon again. (Submitted on August 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,884 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 22, 2024