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Port Lavaca in Calhoun County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Calhoun County Participation During World War II

 
 
Calhoun County Participation During World War II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, July 21, 2018
1. Calhoun County Participation During World War II Marker
Inscription.  Before World War II, Calhoun County was primarily involved in farming, ranching and commercial seafood but after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the county became a major participant in the war effort. In November 1940, much of the county's shoreline had been condemned for military purposes. The federal government took over Matagorda Island and property owners were instructed to pack up all belongings and leave. The seriousness of the situation was realized on June 26, 1942 when Mexican cargo ships were sunk by German U-boats within sight of Port O'Connor. The military established a protective watch area and residents patrolled beaches. One night a patrol discovered Germans coming ashore on Matagorda Peninsula and took them prisoner.

The army installed a surveillance system between October 1940 and January 1941 in Port O'Connor, Port Lavaca and Olivia. Citizens were trained to identify and report airplanes within view. The Port Lavaca tower observed a man using a fishing pole to put up an antenna; he was transmitting information to German U-boats in the Gulf of Mexico. Turtle and Matagorda Bay provided shoreline for the division of artillery
Calhoun County Participation During World War II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, July 21, 2018
2. Calhoun County Participation During World War II Marker
Marker can be seen under the tree to the right of the photo. Visible markers from left to right are: Howard Gallemore Hartzog, Sr., Calhoun County Hurricanes, and Calhoun County Participation During World War II.
to practice and train. The United States Army selected nearby Camp Hulen as the base for anti-aircraft artillery training. Camp Indianola served as an anti-aircraft target practice area that used remote control drones called radio aircraft target service for practice. In 1943, the Matagorda Island Gunnery Range was built that supported training for the island bombing range. Citizens of Calhoun County became a major party to the national war effort to train soldiers for overseas deployment.
 
Erected 2012 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17137.)
 
Location. 28° 36.788′ N, 96° 37.568′ W. Marker is in Port Lavaca, Texas, in Calhoun County. Marker is at the intersection of South Ann Street and West Live Oak Street, on the right when traveling south on South Ann Street. Marker is located on the courthouse grounds. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 211 South Ann Street, Port Lavaca TX 77979, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Calhoun County Hurricanes (here, next to this marker); Howard Gallemore Hartzog, Sr. (here, next to this marker); Halfmoon Reef Lighthouse (approx. 1.7 miles away); Port Lavaca (approx. 1.7 miles away); Battle of Norris Bridge (approx.
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2.8 miles away); Site of the Town of Linnville (approx. 2.9 miles away); Zimmerman Cemetery (approx. 6.9 miles away); Mrs. Angelina Bell Peyton Eberly (approx. 8.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Lavaca.
 
Categories. War, World II
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 90 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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