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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Carnesville in Franklin County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Hebron Presbyterian Church

>>>>--- 2 mi. --->

 

— American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site —

 
Hebron Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 12, 2010
1. Hebron Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription.  Hebron Presbyterian Church was organized in 1796 by Rev. John Newton, a native of Pennsylvania. Rev. Thomas Newton, a younger brother, was the first pastor. First elders were John McEntire and Samuel Makie, natives of Ireland, and Thomas Mayes and William Fleming, from Pennsylvania. Churches organized out of Hebron were: Carnell (Homer), Mount Hermon (Ila), Harmony, Hartwell, Carnesville, Mayesville, Commerce, Cornelia and Hopewell. Nine ministers have gone out from this Church. The work of the church is still carried on by the descendents of its founders. The present building was erected in 1884.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 059-6/409.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion. In addition, it is included in the American Presbyterian and Reformed Historic Sites ⛪, and the Georgia Historical Society series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1796.
 
Location. 34° 18.483′ N, 83° 22.317′ W. Marker is near Carnesville, Georgia, in Franklin County
Hebron Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 12, 2010
2. Hebron Presbyterian Church Marker
Looking north on Georgia Highway 59, with Bold Spring Road (and the church) to the right
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. Marker is at the intersection of Georgia Route 59 and Bold Spring Road (County Route 164), on the right when traveling north on State Route 59. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Carnesville GA 30521, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Federal Road Historic District (approx. 4½ miles away); Nails Creek Baptist Church (approx. 4.8 miles away); Mt. Pleasant Church (approx. 5.6 miles away); Cromer's Mill Covered Bridge (approx. 6½ miles away); Banks County (approx. 7.4 miles away); Home of Governor L.G. Hardman (approx. 8.8 miles away); Franklin County (approx. 8.9 miles away); Indian Boundary (approx. 9.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carnesville.
 
Regarding Hebron Presbyterian Church. Hebron Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

The Hebron Presbyterian Church was organized in 1796. The church grounds include the sanctuary, a historic graveyard, and a one-room
Hebron Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 12, 2010
3. Hebron Presbyterian Church
Built in 1884
school house. The congregation’s third and current building was constructed in 1883. It is a simple country church with a white wood frame. The congregation established a school in 1854. The school’s current building dates from 1909. The school was restored in the late 1980s. The earliest grave in the Hebron Cemetery is that of Elijah McWhorter Ash, an infant who died in 1802. In 1805, the State of Georgia granted the land where the infant had been buried to the trustees of the Hebron Presbyterian Church. The cemetery is still in use today.

 
Also see . . .  National Register of Historic Places datasheet. Statement of significance for this church. (Submitted on August 16, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Hebron Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 12, 2010
4. Hebron Presbyterian Church
The Education Building at the church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 26, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 14, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 2,199 times since then and 59 times this year. Last updated on August 16, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 14, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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