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Toledo in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

William McKinley Monument

 
 
William McKinley Monument Marker (panels 1 through 4) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
1. William McKinley Monument Marker (panels 1 through 4)
Inscription.  
(panel 1)
William McKinley
Born at Niles – Trumbull County, Ohio
January Twenty-Ninth – Eighteen Hundred and Forty-Three
Volunteer Soldier of the Rebellion
Representative in Congress
Twice Governor of Ohio
Twice President of the United States
Died at Buffalo, New York, September Fourteenth
Nineteen Hundred and One

(panel 2)
The President fully realized that his hour
had come – and his mind turned to his maker
he whispered feebly “Nearer my God to Thee”
The words of the hymn
always dear to his heart
then as the final summons came
he faintly murmured: “Goodbye all, Goodbye
it is God’s way – his will be done
not ours.”

(panel 3)
On the afternoon of October Fifth
Nineteen Hundred and One – Anno Domini
twenty six thousand people
of Toledo and Lucas County
whose names are preserved within this monument
voluntarily contributed
to the fund for its construction

(panel 4)
He made the country better and greater
His
William McKinley Monument (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
2. William McKinley Monument (tall view)
Click or scan to see
this page online
career shows the possibilities
of American citizenship
For all time and for all peoples
his name will stand for the sanctity
of the individual – the home -
the nation

 
Topics and series. This historical marker and monument is listed in this topic list: Government & Politics. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #25 William McKinley series list.
 
Location. 41° 39.29′ N, 83° 32.252′ W. Marker is in Toledo, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is on Adams Street east of North Michigan Street (State Route 25), on the left when traveling east. Marker, memorial and statue are located on the Lucas County Courthouse grounds, beside the sidewalk, directly in front of the main front (south) entrance on Adams Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 700 Adams Street, Toledo OH 43604, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lucas County (within shouting distance of this marker); War Savings Stamps (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lucas County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); 6th Ohio Vol. Infantry Memorial Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lucas County (within shouting distance of this marker); Toledo and Lucas County World War Memorial Tree
William McKinley Monument (<i>wide view; back side; facing south along Ontario Street</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
3. William McKinley Monument (wide view; back side; facing south along Ontario Street)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Lucas County Catholic War Veterans Memorial Flagpole (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Spanish American War Memorial (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Toledo.
 
More about this monument. Marker consists of four separate panels, one near the base of each side of the monument pedestal.
 
Also see . . .  William McKinley - 25th President of the United States. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of free silver. McKinley was the last president to have served in the American Civil War, and the only one to have started the war as an enlisted soldier, beginning as a private in the Union Army and ending as a brevet major. Historians regard McKinley's 1896 victory as a realigning election, in which the political stalemate of the post–Civil War era gave way to the Republican-dominated Fourth Party System, which began with the Progressive Era. McKinley defeated Bryan again in the 1900 presidential election, in a campaign focused on imperialism, protectionism, and free silver. His legacy was suddenly cut short when he was shot on September 6, 1901 by Leon Czolgosz, a second-generation Polish-American with anarchist leanings; McKinley died eight days later, and was
William McKinley Monument (<i>wide view; Lucas County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
4. William McKinley Monument (wide view; Lucas County Courthouse in background)
succeeded by his Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Lucas County Courthouse (<i>wide view of front entrance from Adams Street; monument at center</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
5. Lucas County Courthouse (wide view of front entrance from Adams Street; monument at center)
William McKinley image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
6. William McKinley
This 1897 portrait of William McKinley by August Benziger hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“William McKinley's ‘front porch‘ campaign for the White House in 1896 consisted mainly of speeches delivered to well-wishers flocking by train to his Canton, Ohio, home. As president, the main focus of his administration lay in responding to calls for aid in Cuba's struggle against Spanish rule. Although reluctant to meddle, McKinley felt obliged to act when the American battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor, and interventionists blamed it on the Spanish. The result was the Spanish-American War, which led to Cuba's independence and Spain's surrender of the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam to the United States. Despite his own doubts about this turn of events, McKinley made the traditionally isolationist United States more visible in international politics.

One of several portraits derived from 1897-98 sittings at the White House, August Benziger's likeness testifies to McKinley's blandly funereal appearance. But housed in that uninteresting exterior was an unusual supply of warmth and charm that, as one observer put it, made McKinley ‘a marvelous manager of men.’” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 269 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6. submitted on August 23, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Aug. 13, 2022