Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Summit Hill in Carbon County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Five Mile Tree Crossover

 
 
Five Mile Tree Crossover Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 25, 2006
1. Five Mile Tree Crossover Marker
Inscription.  
”Leaving Mt. Pisgah, the weight of the car was again its motive power, and the slight decline in the grade carried it at the speed of eighteen miles an hour to Mt. Jefferson, a distance of six miles and one furlong…”
”Special Correspondent, New York Times, December 14, 1872, p. 3”

To permit empty coal cars to return unobstructed to the foot of the Mt. Jefferson plane, a crossover was constructed when the “Back Track” was laid out in 1844-45. Originally located at the stone abutment up ahead, it became a famous milepost for Switch Back riders as they journeyed from Mauch Chunk to Summit Hill and back.

In later years this overpass, approximately five miles from the Lehigh River, and a large tree growing nearby combined to create a well-known landmark, The “Five Mile Tree,” for Switch Back tourists. Occasionally, coaches moving in opposite directions converged here, providing an extra thrill as one car passed above the other.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1845.
 
Location. 40° 50.355′ N, 75° 49.312′ W. Marker is in Summit Hill, Pennsylvania, in Carbon County. Marker can be reached from East White Bear
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Drive, 3 miles east of Pennsylvania Route 902, on the left when traveling east. Marker is located on the Switchback Railroad Trail, 9/10 mile west (uphill) from where the trail crosses East White Bear Drive near the entrance to Mauch Chunk Lake Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Summit Hill PA 18250, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Switchback Railroad (approx. 0.9 miles away); Backtrack Trestle (approx. 2.6 miles away); Old Presbyterian Cemetery (approx. 2.8 miles away); Philip Ginter (approx. 2.9 miles away); Soldiers Monument (approx. 2.9 miles away); World War I Memorial (approx. 3 miles away); Philip Ginder (approx. 3 miles away); Molly Maguire Executions (approx. 4.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Summit Hill.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Mauch Chunk Switchback Railroad
 
Also see . . .
1. Mauch Chunk Switchback Railroad. Empty cars were hauled back up the track by mules, which then returned to Mauch Chunk in specially built cars attached to the coal trains. Empties had to wait until full cars had completed their down trip before they could return, which created a bottle-neck at Mauch Chunk, and a back track was therefore built in 1845. It consisted of two planes, Mount Pisgah and Mount Jefferson, which used stationary steam engines to haul cars to the top of each plane. Between
Marker detail: Five Mile Tree Crossover, Switchback Railroad image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Five Mile Tree Crossover, Switchback Railroad
A side track and switch, shown on the left, provided a means to switch cars from the “Back Track” to the “Down Track.” This route was also used to get Hackebernie Tunnel mine coal to the Mauch Chunk coal “Schutes.”
the planes, cars were once again propelled by gravity on the back track. (Submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mauch Chunk Switchback Railway. The Mauch Chunk and Summit Railroad was a coal hauling railroad in the mountains of Pennsylvania that operated between 1828 and 1932. It was also the first operational US railway of any substantial length to carry paying passengers. A private line which moved coal for the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company on 3 foot 6 inch gauge track, it was not a common carrier which linked with other railroads. The rail line was laid on top of the company's earlier 9 mile constant-descent-grade wagon road and trains would run for over a hundred years until the middle days of the Great Depression. (Submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Five Mile Tree Crossover Remnants (<i>as seen from the marker today</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 25, 2006
3. Five Mile Tree Crossover Remnants (as seen from the marker today)
Five Mile Tree Crossover Stone Abutment (<i>bridge is gone; only the stone wall remains today</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 25, 2006
4. Five Mile Tree Crossover Stone Abutment (bridge is gone; only the stone wall remains today)
Switchback Railroad Route Map (<i>located on trail, about 1 mile east of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 25, 2006
5. Switchback Railroad Route Map (located on trail, about 1 mile east of marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 1, 2018. It was originally submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 242 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=125628

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 25, 2024