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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Samson Heidenheimer Building

1877

 
 
Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
1. Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker
Inscription.  Samson Heidenheimer, pioneer Galveston merchant, had this building erected in 1877 on the site of the Grand Southern Hotel. The Grand Southern was a four-story forty-room Victorian Hotel of brick construction.

In 1877, a fire originating on Market Street was swept by a brisk south wind across Market and Mechanic Streets to the Strand. Twenty-six buildings in the center of the business district, including the Grand Southern Hotel, were destroyed. As soon as the debris from the fire was cleared away, Samson Heidenheimer began, on the foundation of the hotel, construction of the commercial building shown in the engraving.

This three story brick building which stands today was designed by Galveston architect John Moser. The brick is faced with stucco and the facade ornamented with two story pilasters. The first-floor bays are framed with segmental arches, the second-floor windows with flat arches. The original cornice has been removed.

Some of the largest and most important shipping concerns in the city were housed here, including H. Marwitz & Co., ship chandlers and dealers in wholesale groceries. Herman Marwitz was
Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
2. Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker
a director of the Galveston City Railroad, the Island City Savings Bank, and the Texas Cotton Press. Also housed here was Heinrich Mosle & Co., a large wholesale grocery company. During that time the building was known as the Mosle Building. H. Mosle founded the United Steamship Co., of which he was president, and established the first direct steamship route between Galveston and the Latin American countries.

Fred F. Hunter, “Manufacturing Stationer and Printer,” occupied the building from 1923 to 1976. During that time it was known as the Hunter Building.

In 1985, the building was restored by George and Cynthia Mitchell for use as offices and shops.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureIndustry & CommerceNotable Buildings.
 
Location. 29° 18.39′ N, 94° 47.569′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is on 22nd Street (Kempner Street) south of Mechanic Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located on the sidewalk, near the northwest corner of the subject building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 306 22nd Street, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Stewart Building (within shouting distance of this marker); W. P. Ballinger Law Firm (about 300 feet away, measured in
Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker (<i>wide view; side 2 shows engraving of 1877 building</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
3. Samson Heidenheimer Building Marker (wide view; side 2 shows engraving of 1877 building)
a direct line); United States National Bank Building (about 300 feet away); Juneteenth (about 300 feet away); The First National Bank of Galveston (about 400 feet away); The Strand (about 400 feet away); Washington Hotel (about 400 feet away); Old Galveston Square (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
More about this marker. Marker consists of two large laser-printed metal plaques, one with photo and one with text, mounted on either side of a five-foot tall post.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Samson Heidenheimer, Galveston, Texas
 
Also see . . .  Historic Marker Application: Heidenheimer-Hunter Building. This location, Lot 1 in Block 561, was one of the most important corner lots in the business section of the city at that time, and had been occupied by different enterprises from 1839. As soon as the ashes from the fire had cooled, Sampson Heidenheimer was having the hotel replaced by a three story structure for commercial use. The walls of the hotel, such as were left standing after the fire, were torn down and the new building raised on the foundation of the hotel. (Submitted on January 18, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Samson Heidenheimer Building (<i>north side view; marker visible on sidewalk at right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
4. Samson Heidenheimer Building (north side view; marker visible on sidewalk at right)
Samson Heidenheimer Building (<i>west side view; marker visible on sidewalk</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
5. Samson Heidenheimer Building (west side view; marker visible on sidewalk)
Sidewalk beside the Samson Heidenheimer Building image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
6. Sidewalk beside the Samson Heidenheimer Building
Samson Heidenheimer Building, also known as The Heidenheimer-Hunter Building image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
7. Samson Heidenheimer Building, also known as The Heidenheimer-Hunter Building
The marker can be seen just right of center in this view.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 18, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 165 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 20, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 18, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6, 7. submitted on July 20, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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