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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sharon Springs in Schoharie County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic Main Street Tour

 
 
Historic Main Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, March 9, 2019
1. Historic Main Street Marker
Inscription.  Congress Hall was a magnificent hotel built by H.G. Bang around 1860 to rival the successful Pavilion Hotel and sulphur baths. Although not adjoined, the hotel was part of his beautiful park, Magnesia Temple and bathhouses that surrounded John Gardner''s famous White Sulphur baths. A fire destroyed Congress Hall hotel in 1875 along with the White Sulphur bathhouses. Gardner built a more elegant, ninety-two room bathhouse and reopened in 1876.

Gardner also built the Inhalation House in 1881, as part of his continuing development of the spa. The patient would "inhale” the sulphur vapors through a cup fitted over the face. This reputedly helped with lung and bronchial ailments. Doctors would prescribe a regimented treatment specific to the patient's ailment. This would determine the daily dosage of sulphur either in oral, topical or vaporized application. In the last four decades of the 1900's, the building was used only as a spa related doctor''s office, as inhalation treatments were no longer prescribed.

John's son, Henry Gardner, opened the Imperial Baths on the site of the Congress Hall hotel in 1927 to attract a "modern”
The Imperial Baths image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, March 9, 2019
2. The Imperial Baths
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clientele. The Victorian era sulphur bathhouses were still in use just west of the new building but he hoped to lure more bathers. The Imperial offered Nauheim baths (carbonated sulphur water), Scotch douches (sprayed sulphur water), mud packs, and massages. The heated water was piped into large lead tubs and after a twenty-minute soak, bathers were wrapped in warm sheets and required to rest on a cot in an adjoining room. This method of treatment changed little throughout the 20th century. In the 1960's, one wing of the 1876 bathhouse was demolished. By the last decades, no longer in use, the remaining wing was collapsing.
 
Erected 1999 by The Sharon Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1860.
 
Location. 42° 47.784′ N, 74° 37.002′ W. Marker is in Sharon Springs, New York, in Schoharie County. Marker is on Main Street (Route 10), on the right. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharon Springs NY 13459, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Historic Main Street Tour (a few steps from this marker); Chestnut Street Schoolhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); The White Sulphur Spring (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Magnesia Temple and Baths
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(about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Historic Main Street Tour (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Historic Main Street Tour (about 700 feet away); The American Hotel (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Lehman Block (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharon Springs.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 15, 2019. It was originally submitted on March 11, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 88 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 11, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.   2. submitted on March 12, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Oct. 26, 2021