Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Indianapolis in Marion County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Booker T. Washington

(April 5, 1856 - November 14, 1915)

 
 
Booker T. Washington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 20, 2019
1. Booker T. Washington Marker
Inscription.  Booker Taliaferro Washington was born into slavery and emancipated after the Civil War. He became a teacher, leader of what today is known as Tuskegee University, best-selling author and social activist. From 1890 - 1915, he stood as a dominant figure among African-Americans. Famous in part for an address he delivered, which many African-Americans saw as accommodating segregation rather than opposing it, he bestrode the line between slavery and freedom as one of the last African-American leaders who were emancipated rather than freeborn. His nationwide network of support aided his ceaseless effort to broaden educational opportunities for African-Americans. When he died in 1915, he had built Tuskegee Institute into a thriving institution and furthered the cause of education for African-Americans in the South.

1865
Washington and his family were freed from slavery at the end of the Civil War. He became a houseboy to a wealthy industrialist whose wife encouraged Washington to get an education.

1879
After graduating from seminary in Washington, D.C., Washington taught at Hampton Normal and Agricultural
Booker T. Washington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 20, 2019
2. Booker T. Washington Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
Institute in Virginia.

Watershed Moment
1881

Booker T. Washington was born into slavery, emancipated as a child and became a national spokesperson for African-Americans. At 25, he became the first principal of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Alabama which opened on July 4, 1881, and he remained head of the school until his death in 1915.

1895
Washington delivered his Atlanta Exhibition address to a largely white audience and stated that economic equality was more important than social equality.

1896
Washington delivered his Atlanta Exhibition address to a largely white audience and stated that economic equality was more important than social equality.

1900
In an effort to promote African-Americans' commercial, agricultural, educational and industrial advancement, Washington founded the National Negro Business League (NNBL).

1901
Washington's autobiography, Up From Slavery, was published and became a best seller. Its popularity led to an invitation to the White House by President Theodore Roosevelt, making hi the landmark's first African-American visitor.
 
Erected by Cultural Trail Indianapolis.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African Americans
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Arts, Letters, MusicEducation. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #26 Theodore Roosevelt, the Historically Black Colleges and Universities 🎓, and the Indiana, Cultural Trail Indianapolis series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is July 4, 1881.
 
Location. 39° 46.611′ N, 86° 9.555′ W. Marker is in Indianapolis, Indiana, in Marion County. Marker is on West Walnut Street east of North Illinois Street, in the median. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 705 North Illinois Street, Indianapolis IN 46204, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas Edison (a few steps from this marker); Mark Twain (within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Carnegie (within shouting distance of this marker); Wilbur and Orville Wright (within shouting distance of this marker); Susan B. Anthony (within shouting distance of this marker); Albert Einstein (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Benjamin Franklin (about 300 feet away); Franklin & Eleanor Roosevelt (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Indianapolis.
 
Additional keywords.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
HBCUs
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 5, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 120 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=132846

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 21, 2021