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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Noyer-Wildhagen House

286 Meeting Street

 

— built 1807 —

 
The Noyer-Wildhagen House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2019
1. The Noyer-Wildhagen House Marker
Inscription.  This three and one-half story Federal style single house set on a raised basement was built in 1807 by Ms. Abigail Noyer on land purchased from Mr. Christen Belser. The Federal style is evidenced by the hipped roof, a main entrance with fanlight transom and double sidelights, a lunette window within a pedimented gabledormer, brick laid in the Flemish bond pattern, keystone lintels, and decorative stringcourses.

Soon after the house was constructed Ms. Noyer died and the property was sold to A. Burgess Gordon, a Scottish immigrant. In 1853 Mr. Gordon sold the property to Samuel Farrar, a wealthy grocer and after several subsequent owners the building was purchased by Laura V. Wildhagen in 1910. A doctor's office was located in the basement level with living space on the upper floors of the main house. In the 1920s a drugstore was opened in the basement and operated as one of the last remaining soda fountain drugstores in Charleston from 1951 until 1984 when a devastating fire damaged the upper floors. Construction of the two-story arcaded piazza and the pedimented piazza screen entry with fanlight were replicated during the restoration
The Noyer-Wildhagen House Marker<br>(<i>wide view • marker mounted left side of front door</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2019
2. The Noyer-Wildhagen House Marker
(wide view • marker mounted left side of front door)
of the house after the fire.

The property is located on the western boundary of the Ansonborough neighborhood, Charleston's first suburb, named for George Anson (1697-1762), commander of His Majesty's ship Scarborough. Anson, who acquired the land in 1726, had it surveyed by George Hunter in 1746 and the building lots were laid out along new streets, extending the regular grid pattern of the city.
Placed by the Preservation Society of Charleston
2014

 
Erected 2014 by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Location. 32° 47.089′ N, 79° 55.971′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Meeting Street south of George Street, on the left when traveling south. Marker is mounted at eye-level, directly on the subject house, just to the left of the front entrance, facing Meeting Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 286 Meeting Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington Light Infantry 1907 (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works Project SC 1233 F (within shouting distance of this marker); Rice, Rattlesnakes, and Rainwater (within shouting distance of this marker); 14 George Street
The Noyer-Wildhagen House image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2019
3. The Noyer-Wildhagen House
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dr. Joseph Johnson House   (about 500 feet away); A History of Courtenay Square (about 600 feet away); St. Stephen's Episcopal Church (about 600 feet away); William C. McElheran House (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Categories. ArchitectureNotable Buildings
 

More. Search the internet for The Noyer-Wildhagen House.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 19, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 19, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on June 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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